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WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

-70 Catalog 



James G. Harlow 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/undergra6970west 



BEAU OF. AMISSIONS AID EECOEDS 



West Virginia University 



The 1969/70 
Undergraduate Catalog 



West Virginia University Bulletin 



CORRESPONDENCE 



should be addressed as follow: 



ADMISSIONS 
Director of Admissions 

HOUSING 

Director of Housing 

RECORDS AND REGISTRATION 

The Registrar 

EMPLOYMENT 

Personnel Office 

NDEA AND OTHER LOANS 

Financial Aids Office 

SCHOLARSHIPS, VETERANS AFFAIRS 
The Coordinator 

KANAWHA VALLEY GRADUATE CENTER 
The Dean 
P.O. Box 547W 
Nitro, W. Va. 25143 

PARKERSBURG CENTER 
The Dean 
3108 Emerson Ave. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 26101 

POTOMAC STATE COLLEGE 
Registrar and Director of Admissions 
Keyser, W. Va. 26726 

MATTERS OF GENERAL UNIVERSITY INTEREST 
The President 

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
MORGANTOWN, W. VA. 26506 



WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Series f> ( ). No 11-1 May, 1969 

'l he West Virginia University Bulletin is issued Monday, Wednesday, and Friday throughout the 
Publications included are Announcements of College <>f Law, Medical Center, Graduate 
School, Summer Session; tins Catalog; bulletins <>f the College of Engineering and School of 
Mines; Proceedings of West Virginia Academ) <>i Science; and othei scholarly and scientific- publi- 
cations. 



Contents 



Part I: History, Description, and Organization 

Administrative Officers 5 

History 7 

Organization and Description 8 

morgantown area 10 

Part II: Admission, Fees, Registration, and Regulations 

Admission 11 

Fees and Expenses 1 ( I 

Registration 24 

Regulations Affecting Degrees 25 

Part III: Curricula and Courses 

College of Agriculture and Forestry 40 

Agriculture 50 

Forestry 64 

Appalachian Center 77 

College of Arts and Scdznces 89 

College of Commerce 181 

Creatre Arts Center 194 

Music 196 

Art 20S 

Drama 212 

College of Engineering and School of Mines 2 1 7 

College of Human Resources and Education 254 

Clinical Studdzs 258 

Education 261 

Family Resources 291 

Social Work 298 

School of Journalism 

Division of Military Science and Division of Aerosiw i Sn dees 315 

School of Physical Education 



West Virginia University morgans 

Established February 7, 1867 

The Board of Governors 

TERM EXPIRES 

K. Douglas Bowers, President, Beckley 1971 

Mrs. Gilbert S. Bachmann, Vice-President, Wheeling 1973 

Ralph J. Bean, Moorefield 1970 

Albert B. C. Bray, Jr., Logan 1972 

Pat R. Hamilton, Oak Hill 1977 

Thomas L. Harris, Parkersburg 1974 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick, Wheeling 1975 

Paul B. Martin, Martinsburg 1976 

Charles C. Wise, Jr., Charleston 1969 

James G. Harlow, Chief Executive Officer, Morgantown 

The Board of Governors has charge of the educational, administrative, finan- 
cial, and business affairs of the University, Potomac State College, Parkersburg 
Center, and the Kanawha Valley Graduate Center. 

It is the policy of West Virginia University to provide equal opportunities to all 
prospective and current members of the student body, faculty, and staff .solely on the 
basis of individual qualifications and merit without regard to race, religion, sex, age, 
oi national origin. 

The University also neither affiliates with nor grants recognition to any in- 
dividual, group, or organization having policies that discriminate on the basis of race, 
religion, national origin. 

The Board oi Governors of West Virginia University reserves the right to 
change any provision or requirement stated in this publication within the student's 
term oi residence. It reserves the right also at any time to ask a student to withdraw 
when such action seems to be in the best interest of the University. 

4 



Part I / Administration, History, 
Organization, and Description 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



GENERAL 

President, James G. Harlow, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., LL.D., (1967). 
Vice-President-Administration and Finance, Harry B. Heflin, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

LL.D., (1964). 
Vice-President-Off -Campus Education, Ernest J. Nesius, B.S.A., M.S.A., Ph.D., 

(1968), 1960. 
Vice-President-Planning, Claude Kelley, A.B., M.Ed.D., Ed.D., (1967). 
Provost for Instruction, Jay Barton, II, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., (1968), 1966. 
Provost for Research and Graduate Studies, Robert F. Munn, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., 

(1968), 1952. 
Provost for Health Sciences, Charles E. Andrews, B.S., M.D., (1968), 1960. 
Assistant to the President, Harold J. Shamberger, A.B., M.P.A., (1960), 1949. 
Assistant to the President and Secretary of the Board of Governors, Londo H. Brown, 

A.B., LL.B., (1967), 1950. 
Assistant to the President for Grants and Contracts, George E. Kirk, B.S., MB. A.. 

(1968), 1964. 
Dean of Student Educational Services, Joseph C. Gluck, B.A., B.D., (1968), 1943. 
Director of Admissions, Earl R. Boggs, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., (1965), 1960. 
Director of Libraries, Robert F. Munn, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., (1957), 1952. 
Comptroller, William H. McMillion, B.S., M.S., (1965), 1952. 
Registrar, Stanley R. Harris, A.B., M.S., (1963), 1953. 
Director of University Hospital, Eugene L. Staples, B.S., M.H.A., (1960). 
Director of Alumni Affairs, DAvro W. Jacobs, A.B., (1938). 
Director of Development, Donovan H. Bond, B.S.J., M.A., (1959), 1946. 
Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, Robert X. Brown, A.B., (1954), 1950. 
Director of University Relations, Harry W. Ernst, B.S., M.S., (1968). 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Agriculture and Forestry, Robert S. Dunbar, Jr., Ph.D., Dean, (1964), 1952. 

Agricultural Experiment Station, A. H. VanLandin(.ii \m. Ph.D., Di 
(1959), 1929. 
Appalachian Center, Ronald L. Stump, M.S., Acting Dean; Acting Director. 

Cooperative Extension Service, (1969), 1948. 

NOTE: The date in parentheses indicate yeai of latest appointment. The second date indi- 
cates year of first appointment to a University position. 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFIi 



Arts and Sciences, Carl M. Frasure, Ph.D., Dean, (1961), 1927. 

Lloyd R. Gribble, Ph.D., Associate Dean, (1961), 1929. 
Commerce, Jack T. Turner, D.B.A., Dean, (1969). 

Creative Arts Center, Richard E. Duncan, Ph.D., Dean and Director, (1964), 1958. 
Dentistry, W. Robert Biddington, D.D.S., Dean, (1968), 1959. 
Engineering, Chester A. Arents, M.E., Dean, (1955). 

Engineering Experiment Station, James H. Schaub, Ph.D., Associate Director. 
(1967), 1958. 
Graduate, John C. Ludlum, Ph.D., Dean, (1968), 1946. 
Human Resources and Education, Stanley O. Ikenberry, Ph.D., Dean, (1965), 

1962. 
Journalism, Quintus C. Wilson, Ph.D., Dean, (1961). 
Law, Paul L. Selby, Jr., LL.B., Dean, (1964). 
Medicine, Clark K. Sleeth, M.D., Dean, (1961), 1935. 
Mines, Charles T. Holland, M.S.E.M., Dean, (1961), 1930. 
Nursing, Lorita Duffield Jenab, Ed.D., Dean, (1968). 
Pharmacy, Raphael O. Bachmann, Ph.D., Dean, (1961). 
Physical Education, C. Peter Yost, Ph.D., Dean, (1969), 1946. 
Kanawha Valley Graduate Center, Roman J. Verhaalen, Ph.D., Dean, (1967). 

1964. 
Parkersburg Center, Robert H. Stauffer, Ph.D., Dean, (1967), 1966. 



HEADS OF OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 

Biological Sciences, Institute of, Valentin Ulrich, Ph.D., Director, (1967), 1957. 

Book Store, Ruth E. Robinson, A.M., Manager, (1944), 1939. 

Business Research, Bureau of, James H. Thompson, Ph.D., Director, (1958), 1948. 

Computer Center, Phillip D. Stark, M.S., Acting Director, (1968). 

Counseling Service, James F. Carruth, Ph.D., Director, (1965), 1953. 

Dean of Women and Director of Residence Halls Programs, Betty Boyd, A.B., 

(1965), 1948. 
Government Research, Bureau for (Vacancy). 

Health Service, John J. Lawless, Ph.D., M.D., Director, (1944), 1935. 
High School, University, E. Grant Nine, M.S., Principal, (1960), 1956. 
Housing, Robert A. Robards, B.S.B.A., Director, (1965), 1960. 

Residence Halls, Agnes B. Hovee, M.A., Associate Director of Housing, 
(1956), 1950. 
International Programs, Newton M. Baughman, Ph.D., Director, (1968), 1949. 
Mountainlair, Robert F. McWhorter, M.S., Director, (1959). 
Nursing Services, Audrey E. Windemuth, M.N. A., Director, (1961), 1960. 
Personnel, S. Thomas Serpento, M.A., Director, (1964), I960. 
Physical Plant, Vergil B. Clark, M.S., Director, ( 1965). 
Placement Service, M. Cornelia Ladwig, Ph.D., Assistant Director of Student 

Educational Services, (1965), 1919. 
Publications, John Luchok, B.S.J., Editor, (1953), 1950. 
Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures, C GREGORY Van Camp, M.S.J., Director, 

(1960). 
Regional Research Institute, William H. Miernyk, Ph.D., Director, (1965). 



UNIVERSITY SENATE COMMITTEES, 1968-69 

Constitutional Committees 
EXECUTIVE: President J. G. Harlow, Chairman; \\ . W . Fleming, D. F. Miller, J 

Newhouse, P. Popovich, R. D. Slonneger, C. P. Yost, and \V. II . Baker, 

Secretary. 
MEMBERSHIP AND CONSTITUENCIES: E. H. Tryon, Chairman; II. D. Bennett, 

R. W. Laird, E. O. Roberts, C. B. Taylor, and W. H. Baker (ex officio). 

Standing Committees 
FACULTY WELFARE: A. F. Wojcik, Chairman; J. B. Harley, H. N. Kerr, \Y. D. 

Lorensen, G. E. Toben, and F. E. Wright II. 
NEW COURSES AND COURSE CHANGES: P. Popovich, Chairman; J. Barton, 

L. Fishman, E. K. Inskeep, J. H. Johnston, L. D. Luttrell, W. H. Marshall, M. 

O. Meitzen, D. F. Miller, E. M. Steel, Jr.. R. F. Munn, and J. C. Ludlum, 

(ex officio). 
RESEARCH, RESEARCH GRANTS, AND PUBLICATIONS: A. E. Singer, Chair- 
man; W. E. Collins, R. G. Corbett, J. C. Eaves, J. B. Fanucci, J. J. McPhillips, 

T. J. Sheehan, and J. Luchok (ex officio). 
STUDENT INSTRUCTION: H. E. Kidder, Chairman; C. W. Connell, W. W. French, 

M. T. Heald, J. L. Hicks, Jr., R. H. Neff, M. E. Pool, R. D. Snyder, Jay 

Barton, II (ex officio), and President of the Student Body (ex officio) 
TEACHER EVALUATION: J. L. McBee, Chairman; B. H. Bailey, Robert Britt, J. 

F. Carruth, W. A. Sack, John Semon, and Jay Barton. II (ex officio). 



HISTORY 



West Virginia University combines in a single institution the functions of a 
state university and of a state land-grant university— tasks commonly assigned to two 
or more institutions in other state settings. The range and variety of instructional, 
research, and service programs at WVU is greater than that of most institutions its 
size. 

The University had its origin in the Morrill Act of July 2, 1862, and in an 
act of the 1863 West Virginia legislature accepting the provisions of the federal act. 
The Morrill Act, signed by President Abraham Lincoln, offered 30,000 acres of 
federal land for each of its congressmen to every state that agreed to establish a 
college which provided programs in agriculture and the mechanic arts. West Virginia 
was allocated 150,000 acres (mostly in Iowa and Minnesota) which were sold for 
$88,000 to begin WVU— one of only 68 land-grant institutions in the nation. 

On January 9, 1866, the trustees of Monongalia Academy in Morgantown 
offered the state all of its property, including the site of Woodbum Female Seminary, 
on condition that the new institution be located there. The offer was accepted and 
on February 7, 1867, the Agricultural College of West Virginia was established. The 
following year University President Alexander Martin persuaded the Legislature to 
change the name of the institution to West Virginia University. 



COMMITTI I S 



ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION 



West Virginia University is a member of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. All of WVU's educational programs are fully 
accredited by the North Central Association and by the appropriate accreditation 
agencies of the professional schools. 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately seventeen 
weeks each and a summer session of ten weeks. Requirements for admission and 
character of the work for the summer session are the same as for the regular academic- 
year. Evening classes also are offered for the benefit of those who wish to continue 
their education beyond the high school level and who are unable to attend the usual 
day classes. 

West Virginia University's organization into seventeen colleges, schools and 
divisions indicates the variety of its intellectual life: the College of Agriculture and 
Forestry, College of Arts and Sciences, Center for Appalachian Studies and Develop- 
ment, College of Commerce, Creative Arts Center, School of Dentistry, College of 
Engineering, Craduate School, College of Human Resources and Education, School 
of Journalism, College of Law, School of Medicine, Divisions of Military Science and 
Air Force Aerospace Studies, School of Mines, School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy, 
School of Physical Education. 

The most significant development in WVU's recent history has been its emer- 
gence as a major regional center for graduate and professional education. In its first 
century, the University awarded 12,372 graduate degrees. But more doctor's degrees 
(194) were awarded from 1965 through 1968 than since the Graduate School was 
established in 1930. Enrollment in graduate and professional schools more than 
tripled from 1955-56 to 1967-68 while undergraduate enrollment almost doubled. 

This spectacular growth, with the number of doctoral degrees granted in- 
creasing an average of 47 per cent each year since 1962, has established WVU as a 
research center and has improved the quality of undergraduate instruction. Out- 
standing professors generally want to teach some courses on the graduate level. They 
in turn attract bright graduate students who often teach undergraduate courses. 

Although almost 14,000 students enroll annually on the Morgantown campuses, 
WVU has maintained a small college atmosphere while growing into a university 
with all the advantages that academic diversification can offer. The three Morgan- 
town campuses help prevent bigness from overpowering the individual student. 

Classes for undergraduates are concentrated on the Downtown Campus, which 
also is the center for extracurricular activities and social life. Professional and grad- 
uate students, along with upperclassmen in such fields as nursing, medical technology, 
engineering, the creative arts, and agriculture, attend classes on the Evansdale and 
Medical Center campuses. 

West Virginia University's dramatic growth in physical facilities from 1957-58 
through 1967-68 has been equaled by few universities of its size in the nation. Durum 
that decade, more than $93 million in new buildings and facilities either have been 
built or are under construction on the Morgantown campuses. They include a $7.9 
million Creative Arts Center, engineering and agriculture buildings costing $10 mil- 
lion, the $27.5 million Medical Canter complex, $18.4 million in dormitories and 
apartments, a $2.4 million forestry building, $4 million in chemistiy facilities, a $10.5 
million fieldhouse, the $6.7 million campus activities center (Mountainlair) with its 
adjoining plaza and parking garage. A $2.5 million Law Center to house the College 
of Law is being planned for the Evansdale Campus. 

West Virginia University has three campuses in Morgantown— the 75-acre 
Downtown Campus containing 46 buildings; the 275-acre Evansdale Campus, where 

future growth probably will he concentrated, with 10 buildings; and the - 0-acre 

Medical Center Campus. \ University-operated bus system, considered a model 1)% 
other universities, connects the three campuses. 

S 



For research and demonstration purposes, WVU opei experiment 

farms in Hardy, Jefferson, Mason, Monongalia, and Preston counties; six foresl 

Greenbrier, Mingo, Monongalia, Preston, Randolph, and V 

station near Terra Alta, Preston County; a geology camp near White Sulphur Spri 

and 4-H facilities at Jackson's Mill, Lewis County. 

In today's technological world, education has become too vital to stop at tin- 
edge of a university's main campus. West Virginia University inches in 
two of the state's most industrialized areas— the Kanawha Valley Graduati ' 
serving the Charleston area and the two-year Parkersburg Center. Potori 
College at Keyser is another two-year institution administered by the WVU Boa: 
Governors. 

The West Virginia University-Kanawha Valley Graduate Center, established 
at Institute in 1958, is a fully integrated unit of West Virginia University and its 
academic programs offer resident credit. The Center is under the direction of its 
Dean and there are Program Chairmen for Commerce, Human Resources and Edu- 
cation, and Engineering graduate studies. Most of the classrooms as well as library 
and laboratory facilities are at West Virginia State College at Institute although its 
main faculty and administrative offices as well as a few classrooms are at Nitro. 

The Parkersburg Center is a fully integrated component of West Virginia Uni- 
versity. The program consists of the freshman and sophomore years of the West 
Virginia University baccalaureate degree program, a two-year technological program 
based on local and national technician needs, and non-degree programs designed to 
assist out of school adults in the development of personal competencies. 

For many years, a close relationship has existed between WVU and Potomac 
State College. There are frequent contacts between faculty members and administra- 
tors, and every effort is made to insure that students transferring from Potomac State 
to WVU experience a smooth transition. Potomac State College has been under super- 
vision of the WVU Board of Governors since 1935. The transfer programs are closely 
correlated with the first two years of study available at WVU, and most Potomac 
State College graduates continue their education at the University. 

The University administers an off -campus educational program that touches 
the lives of thousands. They learn better ways of growing food and of mining coal, 
how to manage their money and to become wiser consumers, the techniques of com- 
munity development, to work together in 4-H clubs, the pleasures of good music and 
art. 

WVU's Center for Appalachian Studies and Development, organized in 1963, 
has pioneered nationally in broadening the role of the federally funded Cooperative 
Extension Service from strictly agricultural education to community development. 
The Appalachian Center takes expertise to the people through six area centers and 
offices in all of West Virginia's 55 counties. Field personnel help strengthen local 
antipoverty programs, they work to expand educational opportunities, they help 
farmers raise their incomes, they participate in community development proi< 

Other units of the Appalachian Center provide technical assistance to small 
businessmen, work with labor unions, educate firemen, coal miners, and teachers 
throughout the state, and investigate a variety of problems that bear on economic 
development including water resources. 

West Virginia University's off-campus educational programs even reach as tar 
as the East African nations of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda where 37 WVU pro- 
fessors are working at 14 locations under a contract financed by the U. S. Agency for 
International Development. They are teaching improved agricultural practices on 
the secondary school and college level. 



ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION 



MORGANTOWN AREA 



The Morgantown area (population 56,000) is in many ways an ideal location 
for a modem university— on the Monongahela River only 72 miles from metropolitan 
Pittsburgh but with one of the East's few unspoiled wilderness areas in its backyard, 
the Cheat River Canyon. 

West Virginia University offers the cultural opportunities of a large university 
combined with the advantages of a small city where children can grow up free from 
the fears and overcrowding that corrode metropolitan living. 

The major growth of Morgantown took place in the 1920's, based on the coal- 
mining industry. In the 1960's coal mining remains a major industry in the environs of 
the town, but, with mechanization of its operations, it now accounts for only 10 per 
cent of the labor force. Meanwhile, education and ancillary services have taken the 
coal industry's place as the principal source of local employment. West Virginia Uni- 
versity is the largest single employer, accounting for some 20 per cent of Monongalia 
County employment. 

There are two State facilities in the immediate vicinity of Morgantown. 

West Virginia University manages one of the nation's best continuing edu- 
cation centers at Mont Chateau State Park and Lodge overlooking beautiful Cheat 
Lake. Many conferences and meetings are held at Mont Chateau because of its se- 
cluded mountain location, recreational facilities, and easy access to University faculty 
experts who speak and participate in discussions. Visitors to the park have such 
recreational options as swimming, boating, water skiing and fishing in Cheat Lake, 
hiking and horseback riding on mountain trails, and winter sports. 

Cooper's Rock State Forest affords a camping facility, a beautiful picnic and 
hiking area, a trout fishing pond which is regularly stocked, and spectacular views 
over the Cheat River Valley. Cheat Lake is about five miles from the center of Mor- 
gantown, and the Cooper's Rock parking area about seven miles farther. 

Because of WVU's intellectual resources, the Morgantown area is becoming 
the major research center in the Appalachian region. Three federal agencies have 
located research facilities in the area— the Public Health Service (the Appalachian 
Environmental Health Laboratory and the Appalachian Laboratory for Occupational 
Respiratory Diseases), the Forest Service (the Forestry Sciences Laboratory), and the 
Appalachian Experiment Station of the U. S. Bureau of Mines. 

Two new installations add to the area's variety. They are the handsome 
Robert F. Kennedy Youth Center, a rehabilitation facility for youths who violate 
federal laws (mostly interstate car theft), and an earth tracking station of the Com- 
munications Satellite Corporation in neighboring Preston County (its 97-foot antenna 
will send and receive world-wide telephone and other communications from satel- 
lites in outer space). 



10 



Part II / Admission, Fees, Registration, 
And Regulations 



ADMISSION 

ADMISSION FROM SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Students may be admitted to the University on the basis <>l examination or 
transcripts from accredited high schools. High school graduates are required to pre- 
sent credit for 4 units of English and 1 unit of algebra. In addition, agriculture, 
chemistry, forestry, geology, mathematics, physics, and the health sciences require 
1 unit of geometry. Engineering and mining majors are required to present 2 units 
of algebra. 1 unit of geometry and % unit of trigonometry, or its equivalent. Students 
who do not meet these requirements in mathematics may apply for admission to the 
pre-engineering curriculum. 

All students entering as first-term freshmen are required to take the Ami 
College Testing Program tests (ACT) and have the report of scores sent to the Uni- 
versity. This test is used for placement and no other test may be substituted for it. 

Students from West Virginia high schools should obtain applications t 
mission from their high schools. Out-of-state students may write the Office of Ad- 
missions and request an application form. Applicants should prepare their part of the 
application and then return it to the secondary school. The schools will then send 
the completed application and a transcript of high school grades directly to the 
Office of Admissions. Applications and transcripts must be received by the University 
at least three weeks in advance of registration. 

Students should apply for admission when they have met these requirements: 

West Virginia Residents 

1. If, after 6 semesters of secondary school, the student has a grade-point 
average of 2.5 of a possible 4.0 ("C+" or above), he should apply as soon as possible 
after September 15. 

2. If, after 7 semesters of secondary school, the student has a grade-point 
average of 2.0 of a possible 4.0 ("C" or above), he should apply as soon as possible 
after beginning the 8th semester. 

3. If the student has a grade-point average of 2.0 of a possible 4.0 "C 
average) at graduation, he should apply immediately after graduation from the 
secondary school. 

4. Return the application to your secondary school. The school will complete 
the confidential report and mail the application, the computer sheet, and a eopy of 
your high school transcript to the Office of Admissions, West Virginia University. II 
you are applying on the basis of your GED examination, an official cop) of your 
test scores and certificate must be sent to the Office of Admissions. 

Out-of-State Residents 

1. If, after 6 semesters of secondary school the student lias a made-point 
average of 3.0 of a possible 4.0 "B" or above), he should applj as soon as possible 
after September 15. 

2. If, after 7 semesters the student has a grade-point average of 2.5 ol a 
possible 4.0 ("C+" or above), he should apply as soon as possible aftei the beginning 
of the 8th semester. 

// 



3. If the student has a grade-point average of 2.0 of a possible 4.0 ("C" aver- 
age) at graduation, he should apply immediately after graduation from secondary 
school. 

4. Return the application to your secondary school. The school will complete 
the confidential report and mail the application, the computer sheet, and a copy of 
your high school transcript to the Office of Admissions, West Virginia University. If 
you are applying Oil the basis oi your GED examination, an official copy of your 
test scores and certificate must be scut to the Office of Admissions. 

West Virginia University encourages students to work to their capacity and to 
advance as rapidly as appropriate in their academic work. Therefore, qualified juniors 
and seniors who take college level subjects offered in their schools in cooperation 
with the CEEB Advanced Placement Program should take the appropriate three- 
hour examinations administered by the Advanced Placement Service and have the 
scores and tests sent to West Virginia University. Credit for corresponding West 
Virginia University courses is automatically given for high achievement in these tests. 

Students may petition departments to take placement examinations, after they 
have registered, covering courses offered at West Virginia University. Credit or ad- 
vanced placement is given for satisfactory completion of these tests. 



ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Applicants for transfer from another college or university should submit the 
following to the Office of Admissions: 

(1) A complete application for undergraduate admission. 

(2) A certified transcript of all college work taken to date, including a state- 
ment of good standing. A certified statement covering subjects subsequently taken 
should be sent as soon as it is available. 

(3) Catalog pages describing all subjects which have or will have been com- 
pleted; the applicant's name should be written on each page and each subject indi- 
cated by a check mark in the margin. Complete catalogs should not be sent. (Not 
necessary from West Virginia colleges.) 

The cumulative average of all work attempted must be at least "C". Credit is 
transferable in single courses carrying a grade of "C" or higher. A grade of "D" on 
the first of sequence courses may be transferred if the second course grade is "C" 
or higher. 

An average of 2.0 on all mathematics courses completed is required for trans- 
fer into the College of Engineering or School of Mines. 

All transcripts must be in the Office of Admissions three weeks in advance ol 
registration. 

Transcript credit from junior colleges is limited to 72 semester hours of lower- 
division courses. 

Special students are subject in all respects to the usual rules relating to regis- 
tration and scholarship. Admission to any class is subject to the approval of the in- 
structor in charge. 

Evaluation of transcripts For transfer of credit is furnished only alter receipt 

oi complete official transcripts and application for admission. 

Transfer students generally are admitted only after they complete one full 
year at another institution. Applicants who have less than one full year of college 

WOrk elsewhere must submit both their college and high school records. Students 
who have Successfully Completed Six hours or less at another accredited institution 

v. ill apply ;i^ freshmen. 

12 



ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Persons not desiring to become candidates for a degree may, by special per- 
mission, be admitted as special students. Such students are subject in all respects to 
the usual rules relating to registration and scholarship. Admission to any class is sub- 
ject to the approval of the instructor in charge. 

Students who do not plan to follow a degree program at West Virginia Uni- 
versity should submit only a statement of good standing from the last college 
attended. 



ADMISSION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Foreign citizens applying for undergraduate entrance must have their com- 
pleted application available for review at least four months prior to the date of en- 
rollment. Decisions about admission cannot be made until complete records have 
been received. Inquiries and applications should be addressed to the Office of Ad- 
missions. 

Students applying as undergraduates should have completed the equivalent of 
a secondary education and ranked higher than average in their class. 

Students with a native language other than English are required to take the 
"Test of English As a Foreign Language." Applications for the test should be ad- 
dressed to: TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. 

Preliminary applications, prepared by the Institute of International Education, 
are available at United States consulates and United States Information Agency 
offices. 

Foreign students should make all arrangements for the financial obligations to 
West Virginia University and for their entire stay in the United States before leaving 
their countries. 



READMISSION 

Undergraduate students who leave the University for at least one complete 
semester are required to submit an application for readmission to the Director of 
Admissions. 

Students who have been suspended from the University must have written 
approval from the dean of the school or college from which the student was sus- 
pended. 

Approval in writing must be secured in advance to elect courses offered else- 
where. An overall average of "C" is required on all work completed at the University 
in order to obtain such approval. Credit will be accepted for transfer for courses 
carrying a grade of "C" or higher when the conditions indicated above have been 
met. 

Students wishing to change their major upon readmission must have per- 
mission from their previous dean and the dean of the college to which they wish to 
transfer. 



ADVANCED STANDING EXAMINATION 

Application for advanced standing on work of college grade for which college 
credit cannot be established on the basis of official transcript of record should be 

ADAf/SS/O.Y 13 



made to the Registrar of the University. Upon payment of the proper fee the Regis- 
trar will issue an examination permit. After examination, the department will report 
to the Registrar those courses, it any, for which the applicant is entitled to credit. 
Credit shall be certified only for "C" or higher rating and "No Credit" for any lower 
rating. 



VETERANS 

The University recognizes that men and women from the armed fortes who 
enter college require individual and personalized guidance in order to facilitate their 
entrance and to aid their adjustment to University life. The Veterans Coordinator is 
available for consultation and help in the solution of personal problems which may 
arise in the transition to civilian student life. 

Information regarding educational opportunities made possible at the Univer- 
sity through provisions of the Veterans Readjustment Benefits Act of 1966— CM. Bill 
(Public Law 358), the Vocational Rehabilitation Program of the Veterans Adminis- 
tration (Public Law 16), and the War Orphan's Educational Assistance Act of 1956 
(Public Law 634) may be obtained from the Veterans Coordinator by personal con- 
ference or by mail. An amendment to Public Law 634, passed by Congress in the 
summer of 1964, provides benefits to many dependents of 100 per cent disabled 
veterans. 

Veterans having at least one continuous year of military service may be ex- 
empted from the Physical Education general program. No scholastic credit is given. 
Present proof of military service to the Registrar. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

Applicants seeking admission to the College of Commerce for the purpose of 
obtaining a degree must have earned at least 58 semester hours of required and 
approved elective courses in the Pre-Commerce curriculum at a grade average of 
not less than "C." No student will be admitted who has not completed Economics 51 
and 52 and Accounting 51. Freshmen and sophomores are enrolled as Tie-Commerce 
students in the College of Arts and Sciences where their programs of study will be 
directed by Pre-Commerce advisers. 



CREATIVE ARTS CENTER (Music-Art-Drama) 

Placement tests and auditions or a portfolio of the student's ait work max be 
requested for admission to the Creative Arts Center. 

Students transferring to the Creative Arts Center from other colleges and 
schools will be required to present a minimum grade-point average of 2.0. Exceptions 
may be made in the ease of first-semester freshmen. 

Advanced standing in the Division of Music in Applied Music and Music 
I heory IS given only by examination. 



SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

Applicants I'M admission to the School ol |)entisti\ should write to the Associ- 
ate Registrar, Medical Center, West Virginia University, who will furnish official 
blanks upon which formal application must be made. 

// 



A $10.00 application fee is required and must accompany the application. 

Applicants must present evidence of having completed successfully two full 
academic years (60 semester or 90 quarter hours) of work in the liberal arts in an 
accredited college based on the completion of the prescribed four-year high school 
course. All science courses shall include both lecture and laboratory instruction. The 
college courses shall include not less than 6 semester hours credit each in English 
composition and rhetoric, in biology (preferably zoology), in physics, in inorganic 
chemistry, and in organic chemistry. 

A dental aptitude testing program is sponsored by the Council on Dental Edu- 
cation of the American Dental Association and approved by the American Association 
of Dental Schools. Applicants for admission to the School of Dentistry are required 
to take the aptitude tests and to submit the resulting scores. These scores will be 
considered as a factor in the selection of students. The tests may be taken in any 
one of the dental schools, or any one of the testing centers set up in colleges and 
universities throughout the United States. Information concerning the places, and the 
dates on which the tests will be given, may be obtained from the Secretary of the 
Council on Dental Education, Division of Educational Measurements, American 
Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611. 

A personal interview with the Committee on Admissions is required. Inter- 
views will be at the Medical Center, West Virginia University, and will be arranged 
as far as possible, to suit the convenience of the applicant. 

Good physical and mental health are essential for the successful study and 
practice of dentistry. Good eyesight is particularly important. The applicant who is 
admitted to the School of Dentistry must present on or before the day of enrollment, 
a certificate from the examining doctor stating the condition of his eyes, and if any 
correctible defects in vision exist he shall present evidence that proper corrections 
have been made. 

A deposit fee of $50.00 for residents and $100 for nonresidents is required 
when the applicant accepts offer of admission. This amount will be applied as part- 
payment of the tuition fee when the applicant registers for the first semester. The 
deposit will be forfeited if the applicant fails to register. 

Division of Dental Hygiene. The dental hygiene program is a division of the 
School of Dentistry. Its curriculum offers a four-year degree program for dental 
hygienists. Upon the fulfillment of all prescribed requirements and with the recom- 
mendation of the School of Dentistry, the candidate shall be awarded the degree, 
Bachelor of Science in Dental Hygiene. The general admission policies established 
by West Virginia University shall be met. The applicant must be a graduate of an 
accredited high school or preparatory school which is acceptable for college entrance. 
One unit in both algebra and plane geometry will be necessary for admission. The 
Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test will be required of every applicant. 

Further details concerning requirements of the School of Dentistry may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Associate Registrar, Medical Center, or the Director of 
Dental Hygiene, Medical Center. 

Complete information concerning the School of Dentistry may be found in the 
current Announcements of the Medical Center. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND SCHOOL OF MINES 

For admission to the College of Engineering or the School of Mines, prospec- 
tive students must be qualified for admission to the University, present credit for 2 
units or algebra and 1 unit of geometry ( 1 unit of plane geometry or 1 unit inte- 
grated geometry or Yi unit plane geometry and & unit solid geometry) and Jz unit of 



ADMISSION 15 



trigonometry. Students who do not meet these requirements in mathematics may 
apply lor admission to the pre-engineering or the pre-mines course in the College of 

Arts and Si iences. All applications should be sent to the Director of Admissions. 

It is highly recommended that prospective students take the American College 
Tests (ACT) in the spring preceding their admission to the College of Engineering 
or School of Mines. Based upon these test results, it is further recommended that 
those students who require an additional background in mathematics or English 
attend the summer session of the University, enrolling in courses such as Math. 3 
(College Algebra). Math. 4 (Plane Trigonometry), and English 0. Completion of 
these courses will permit the student to enter the regularly scheduled engineering 
program at the beginning of the fall semester. 

Students desiring to transfer from another college, school or university into the 
College of Engineering or the School of Mines must meet the following requirements: 

(A). Have a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher for all college level courses 
(English 0. Math. 0. 1, 2, and 7 count for entrance only). 

(B). Have a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher for all mathematics courses 
excluding only Math. and 1. 



COLLEGE OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND EDUCATION 

Requirements for admission to the undergraduate programs of the College of 
Human Resources and Education are listed by Divisions in subsequent pages of this 
bulletin. Candidates for Bachelor's Degrees in Home Economics and in Speech Path- 
ology and Audiology may enter these programs during the freshman year. 

Students who enter the Division of Education must have completed a mini- 
mum of 58 semester hours with a grade-point average of at least 2.25 on all work 
attempted. These candidates register for their first two years of work in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Freshmen and sophomores who expect to enter the Division of 
Education, College of Human Resources and Education, will indicate their intention 
when they register. Their studies will be directed by advisers for pre-education stu- 
dents. Such students should so arrange their courses of study so as to satisfy require- 
ments for junior standing and should be fulfilling requirements for the certification of 
teachers. 



SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM 

A candidate seeking admission to die School of Journalism for die purpose of 
obtaining a degree must have satisfied requirements lor admission to one of the 
University undergraduate colleges and must have earned at least 58 semester hours 
of college credit. A student deficient in the physical education service program will 

be required to take these subjects as scon as possible. During his freshman and 

sophomore years he should have completed satisfactorily all or most courses specified 
for prejournalism majors. A prejoumalism student not maintaining at least a "C" 
average during his firs! iw<> \eais in all college subjects must apply directly to the 
School of Journalism Committee on Academic Standards for admission. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Applicants for admission to the School o\ Medicine should write to the Associ 
ate Registrar, Medical Center, Wesl Virginia University, who will furnish official 
blanks upon which formal application must be made. 

16 



A $10.00 application fee is required and must accompany the application. 
The requirements outlined below may be met in either of two ways: first and 
preferably, by pursuing a course of study leading toward a Bachelor's Degree with 
major and minor fields of the applicant's own choosing; or secondly, by following a 
more rigidly prescribed curriculum generally offered as a "premedical" curriculum. 
In either case, the applicant must have completed satisfactorily the minimum require- 
ments listed below: 

English Composition and Rhetoric . 1 year 

Zoology or Biology (with laboratory) 1 year 

Inorganic Chemistry (with laboratory) 1 year 

Organic Chemistry (with laboratory) 1 year 

Physics (with laboratory) 1 year 

Social Studies 1 year 

A total of 90 semester hours of work, exclusive of military science or aerospace 
studies and physical education, is required. 

The number of students the School of Medicine can accommodate is strictly 
limited. Applications for admission are considered by the Committee on Admission of 
the School of Medicine, which selects those with the highest qualifications of scholar- 
ship and personal fitness. An important factor is the score of the applicant in the 
Medical College Admission Test sponsored by the Association of American Medical 
Colleges and given at suitable times. Students should consult premedical advisers 
about this test or should write to The Psychological Corporation, 304 East 45th St., 
New York, New York 10017. Applications for admission may be made as much as a 
year in advance of the opening date. 

Each applicant is required to deposit $50.00 before his name is entered upon 
the official list of those accepted to the School of Medicine. If the applicant enrolls, 
this sum is applied to the tuition of the first semester. If the application is withdrawn 
after the applicant has been offered a place and has made a deposit, such deposit 
may be refunded at any time prior to January 15 of the year in which enrollment is 
anticipated. 

Complete information concerning the School of Medicine may be found in the 
current Announcements of the Medical Center. 

Medical Technology 

(A). Admission requirements for the first year (premedical technology) are 
those for the College of Arts and Sciences, namely, 15 units of high school work in- 
cluding subjects specified in the Arts and Sciences section. One unit of algebra and 
one unit of plane geometry are required; chemistry and physics are very desirable. 

(B). Admission to the third year (Medical Technology I) is based upon two 
years of college work with a total of 64 semester hours, as follows: 

English. 6 hours. (Composition and rhetoric.) 

Biological Science. 8 hours (General Zoology or General Biology.) 

Chemistry. 15-16 hours. (Inorganic Chemistry, 8 hours; Quantitative Analysis, 
3-4 hours; Organic Chemistry, 4 hours) [Transfer students are required to have a 
complete course in Organic Chemistry to include aliphatic and aromatic compounds.] 

Physics. 8 hours. 

Physical Education. 4 hours for women. 2 hours for men. (University require- 
ments for students taking first two years in residence.) 

Mathematics. 3 hours. (College Algebra.) 

Electives to complete the required hours and to meet Core Curriculum require- 
ments. Courses such as bacteriology, parasitology, and anatomy should not be taken 
until after the completion of the sophomore year. A foreign language is recom- 
mended for students who plan to do graduate work. 

ADMISSU^X 17 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Initial application to the University should he submitted to the Admissions 
Office and should follow the same procedure as for all other University freshmen. 

Students arc enrolled in the pre-nursing program in the College of Arts and 
nces for tlie freshman year. Contact with the School of Nursing is insured during 
this year through two required mirsing courses and nurse-faculty advisers for pre- 
nursing students. 

Application for admission to the School of Nursing should be made on or 
about December 1 of the college freshman year. Application forms are available up- 
on requesl from the Associate Registrar, Medical Center. West Virginia University, 
ntowii. Wesi \ irginia 26506. 

A candidate lor nursing should have good physical and mental health as well 
as those personal qualifications appropriate to a professional person. The School of 
Nursing through its Admissions Committee admits students, who, by reason of per- 
sonal and intellectual qualities, show promise of benefiting from the program and of 
contributing to the field of nursing. Factors influencing decision of the Admissions 
Committee are: academic record, motivation for academic nursing, health, personal 
qualities, and social adjustment. A dominant factor in admission is the availability oi 
es in the class. Applicants, who, in the judgment of the Admissions Committee. 
present the highest overall qualifications are selected for admission to nursing. Upon 
acceptance, a $50.00 tuition deposit is required. Students are required to attend the 
summer session immediately following the freshman year. 

Additional information concerning the School of Nursing may be found in the 
Announcements of the Medical Center. 

Nursing Transfer Students 

A student from any other accredited college or university is eligible for ad- 
mission with credit if she presents a grade-point average of 2.0, or better, based on 
all work attempted at previous institutions. Courses must be comparable to those re- 
quired in the University's curriculum, except for courses in Orientation to Nursing. 
Because oi the design of this curriculum, a transfer student must complete a mini- 
mum of three years and a summer session in the School of Nursing regardless o\ 
previous college credit. 

Application for transfer should be initiated by December 1 in order to allow 
time for evaluation and processing of credentials. Graduates of Associate 1 Degree 
programs in nursing are regarded as transfer students. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The professional curriculum of the School of Pharmacy is based on two years 
•j pre-ph arma< ■> requirements. The pre-pharmacy requirements are as follows: 

8 hr 

12 hr. 

(i hr. 



Ugebra 


3 hr. 


I'h\ sics 


1 1 igonometrj 


3 hr. 


Kleefives from 


English Composition 


6 hr. 


Core Group A 


Principles "f Economics 


6 hr. 


( lore ( Jroup B 


Biolog) . ( ■> nerd 


8 hr. 




Chemistry, General 


8 hr. 




Chemistry, Organic 


8 hr. 


Total 



68 hr. 

Group \ 'at least two subjects*: \it music; foreign languages and literature, 
including Latin and Greek (abov< the elementarj level); literature of the English 
philosoph) humanities. 

IS 



Group B: Geography; history; psychology; political science; social science; 
sociology. 

Students electing to take Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies will 
be exempt from an equivalent number of hours of electives in Core Groups A and B. 

A 2.00 average in all courses undertaken, except Military Science, Air Force 
Aerospace Studies, and Physical Education, is considered the minimum standard for 
admission. 

For admission to the School of Pharmacy, formal application should be made 
to the Admissions Committee of the School as early as possible after February 1 but 
before June 1, preceding the fall term in which the student is seeking enrollment. 

Applicants should write to the Associate Registrar, Medical Center, West Vir- 
ginia University, who will furnish official blanks upon which formal application must 
be made. 

A $10.00 application fee is required and must accompany the application. 

Each applicant is expected to deposit $50.00 before his name is entered upon 
the official list of those accepted to the School of Pharmacy. If the applicant enrolls, 
this sum is applied to the tuition of the first semester. If the applicant fails to enroll, 
this deposit fee is forfeited by the applicant. 

Complete information may be obtained from the Dean of the School of Phar- 
macy or from the Associate Registrar, Medical Center. 

Further details concerning the School of Pharmacy are contained in the cur- 
rent Announcements of the Medical Center. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

All University fees are subject to change without notice. 

All fees are due and payable at the Comptroller's desk in the Field House An- 
nex (South) on the days of registration. Students must pay fees before registration is 
accepted. Completion of arrangements for payment from University payroll checks, 
officially accepted scholarships, loan funds, grants or contracts shall be considered 
sufficient for acceptance of registration. Fees paid after regular registration must be 
paid at the Comptroller's office in the Administration Building. Any student failing 
to complete registration on regular registration days is subject to the Late Registra- 
tion Fee of $10.00. Students registering pay the fees shown on page 20, plus special 
fees and deposits as required. 

By order of the Board of Governors, no degree will be conferred upon any 
candidate prior to payment of all tuition, fees, and other indebtedness to any unit of 
the University. 

Laboratory Fees 

Consult departmental sections of this Catalog for information concerning non- 
refundable laboratory fees, deposits, and microscope rental fee. ( See Biology, Botany, 
and Zoology, page 108; Chemistry, page 112; Family Resources, page 128; Geology, 
142; Physics, page 161; Psychology, page 169). 



FEES A\ T D EXPE\ 19 



SEMESTER FEES IX THE COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

(See Footnotes 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) 



College 


Full-Time 


or 






School 


Resident 


Nonresident 


CROUP I 






Agriculture and Forestry 






Arts and Sciences 






Commerce 






Creative Arts Center 


S90.00 plus 


$255.00° plus 


Music, Art. Drama) 


Registration Fee 


Registration Fee 


Engineering 


of $50.00. 


of $200.00. 


Hum. in Resources 






and Education 






Journalism 






Mines 






Physical Education 






GROUP II 






Dental Hygiene 






Law 


$105.00° plus 


$280.00° plus 


Medical Technology 


Registration Fee 


Registration Fee 


(Jr. and Sr. Years) 


of $50.00. 


of $200.00. 


Nursing 






Pharmacy 






GROUP III 


$167.00° plus 


$385.00° plus 


Dentist ry 


Registration Fee 


Registration Fee 


Medicine 


of $50.00. 


of $200.00. 




Part-Time 




Tuition, per semester hour 


Resident Nonresident 


Undergraduate studei 


ts $ 


9.00°° $33.00° °° 



Graduate and professional students 
(Dentistry, Law, and Medicine) 



$14.00' 



$38.00' 



•Include! Athletics Fee, $8.25; Student Educational Services Fee, $4.00; Dailv Athe- 
naeum, $1.50; Health, Counseling Service, and Program Fee, $12.00; Student Union Fee, ^20.00; 
L 25 . 
••Includes $4.00 per Bemestei hour Registration Fee. 
•••Includes $16.00 per semester hour Registration Fee. 

' • nt. i of West Virginia University: $15.00 pel semester hour for resident 
students: $17.00 per semester hour ior nonresident students. 

Kanawha Will. Graduate Nitre, W. Va.): $14.00 per semester hour for resident 

students; S38.00 per semester hour i<n nonresident students. 

Student Union Fee and l)ail\ Athenaeum Fee 

The following fees are charged all students, full-time and part-time, who are 
Ued for m' nli- i lurses "I residenl instruction at West Virginia University in 
Morgantown: 
Student Union Fei $20.00 per semester 

Dail .$ 1.50 per semester 

Student Union Fee $12.00 per summer term in ex- 

cess of five weeks 
Student Union Fee x 6.00 per five-week summer 

term or any portion thereof 
I), ul- $ LOO per full Sunimei Session 






These fees are nonrefundable unless the student withdraws officially before 
the close of General Registration for the term or course in which he has been en- 
rolled. 

Special Fees 

Late-registration Fee (nonrefundable) 1 S 10.00 

Graduation Fee 2 10.00 

Professional Engineering Degree (including S10 graduation fee) 25.00 

Student's Record Fee 3 1.00 

Fee for Change in Registration (after 8th day) 1.00 

Fee for Examination for Entrance Credit, per unit 1.00 

Fee for Examination for Advanced Standing 3.00 
Fee for General Educational Development Tests 

(high-school level)* 15.00 

Certificate of Advanced Study in Education 2.00 

Fee for Reinstatement of Students Dropped From the Rolls . 3.00 

Fee for Examination of Candidates for Graduate Degree 3 1.00 

Diploma Replacement Fee 5.00 

Physical Education Student Fee 5.00 

Student Identification Card Replacement Fee 1.00 

Correspondence Course in Guided Reading (per course) 1.00 

Driver Education Laboratory Fee 10.00 

Labor Education Service (for informal activities) 2.00-10.00 

Social Work Field Supervisory Fee (per semester) 70.00 



! This fee is not charged to full-time students who complete registration during the regular 
registration days as set forth in the University Calendar. This fee is not charged to part-time 
students who complete registration by the close of office hours on the eighth day following the 
beginning of General Registration. 

2The Graduation Fee is payable by all students at the beginning of the semester or term in 
which they expect to receive their degrees. 

3 One transcript of a student's record is furnished by the Registrar without charge. This fee 
is charged for furnishing an additional transcript. 

4 If the applicant applies for admission to and registers in the University within twelve 
months of the date for his qualifying for the test, a S 10.00 credit shall be established for him. 

5 For graduate students not otherwise enrolled at time of final examination. 

C A full-time student is one who is registered for 12 or more semester hours of work each 
semester of the regular academic year, or 9 or more semester hours of work during the 10-week 
Summer Session, or 6 semester hours of work during a 5-week Summer Term. A full-time student 
during the regular acadmic year receives an Identification Card which entitles him to all athletic 
events. A full-time student during the regular academic year or during the Summer Session is 
entitled to free medical consultation and advice from the University physician. A moderate charge 
is made for room calls, X-ray, special laboratory tests, drugs furnished by the University Phar- 
macy, minor operations, treatment of fractures and dislocations, and intravenous treatment. 

7 A part-time student is one who is registered for fewer than 12 semester hours per semester 
during the regular academic year, or for fewer than 9 semester hours during the 10-week Summer 
Session or fewer than 6 semester hours during a 5-week Summer Term. 

SNo person shall be considered eligible to register in the University as a resident student 
who has not been domiciled in the State of West Virginia for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding college registration. No nonresident student may establish domicile in this State, 
entitling him to reduction or exemptions of tuition, merely by his attendance as a full-time stu- 
dent at any institution of learning in the State. A minor student whose parents acquire a West 
Virginia domicile after the student's original registration will be deemed to have the domicile of 
his parents and become entitled to pay resident fees. Moreover any student who has originally 
paid nonresident fees may become entitled to pay resident fees, if after an interim of non- 
attendance or otherwise he has established a valid legal domicile in this State at least twelve 
months prior to his registration in the University. In any event, the appointment of a guardian for 
a minor student temporarily resident in West Virginia, other than the designation of a natural 
guardian, shall not in and of itself operate to establish a West Virginia domicile for such student. 

e The minimum rate for noncredit courses is that charged for one semester hour of credit. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 21 



Fees for Extension Courses 

A fee ol $12.00 per semester hour and an off-campus extension fee of $12.00 
per coursi are charged for enrollment in each extension course. Fees For extension 
courses are due and payable at or prior to the first class meeting. 

Undergraduate and Graduate Music Students 

Full-time or part-time students registered for Bachelors' or advanced degrees 
in Music or Supervisory Training Program in Music shall pay the regular full-time or 
part-time fees for all courses in music. No additional fees are assessed for Applied 
Music. 

Students registered in other colleges or schools, including the Graduate School, 
may enroll in class courses in music at the regular full-time or part-time fee per 
credit hour. These students may also enroll for Applied Music for a maximum of 
one half-hour lesson per week for one hour credit. The fee for this Applied Music 
instruction shall be $20.00 in addition to the aforementioned tuition and registration 
fees. 

Practice and Rental Fees 

(a) Practice room— one hour a day, $6.00 per semester; two hours, $10.00; 
three hours, $14.00; four hours, $18.00. 

(b) Pipe-organ practice— one hour a day, $10.00 per semester. 

(c) Band and orchestra instruments— rental fee $2.50 per semester. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The Summer Session is ten weeks in length. It opens in June ami closes in 
August. 

Requirements for admission and character of the work offered are the same I'M 
the Summer Session as for the regular academic year. 

University High School is in session for secondary-school student teaching, 
practice supervision, and observation. 

Credit may be obtained towards the Bachelor's, Master's, and toward the Doc- 
torate. Offerings are varied from summer to summer so that students may complete 
work for the Master's Degree by attending summer sessions only. 

For complete information, see the Summer Session Bulletin. 

Summer Session Fees 

Tuition, per semester hour Resident Nonresident 

Undergraduate students $ 9.00* $33.00' 

Graduate and professional students 

(Dentistry, Law, and Medicine) 14.00° 38.00' 

Daily Athenaeum Feeft 1.00 1.00 

Health and Counseling Services Feel 7.00 7.00 

Studenl Union Fee per summer term 

in excess of five weeksff 12.00 12.00 

Student Union Fee per five-week summer term 

or any portion thereof ] f 

Student Educational Services Feel 
University Feel 

'Includes $4.00 pi i semester hour Registration Fee. 
••Includes $16.00 per Bemestei hour Registration Fee. 
\ Nonrefundable fees required of full-time students. May be paid by part-time students 
who desire the services. Part-time students who elect to pay these fees must pay the same amount 
i .1 (nil tunc students. 
tfFee required of all students. (Nonrefundable unless student withdraws officially before 
the (lose of genera] registration). 

22 



,0 o 



I o o 



6.00 


6.00 


2.00 


2.00 


2.00 


2.00 



Refunding of Fees 

A student who officially withdraws from University courses may arrange for a 
refund of fees by submitting to the University Comptroller evidence of eligibility for 
a refund. 

To withdraw officially a student must apply to the Registrar (see "Withdrawal 
from the University" page 30.) Semester fees will be returned in accordance with 
the following schedule: 

All Activity fees chargeable to 
First refund period ending on the eighteenth 1 S ? ecial S«vtaes "™* aH °* er 

day following the beginning of General Regis- [ semester fees less $2 f °' (Under 

. .. no circumstances is the amount 

tration. I , _ , 

J retained less than $2.50.) 

Second refund period ending on the fifth 

Friday following the beginning of General \ 70% of all refundable fees. 10 

Registration. J 

Last refund period ending on the eighth 

Friday following the beginning of General \ 40% of all refundable fees. 10 

Registration. J 

The second Friday following the beginning of General Registration for a sum- 
mer session or a summer term is the end of the refund period. 

No part of the Activity Fee is refundable unless the student withdraws from 
the University. 

The University Board of Governors has ordered that students called to the 
armed services of the United States be granted full refund of refundable fees, but 
no credit, if the call comes before the end of the first three-fourths of the term, and 
that full credit by courses be granted to men called to the armed services of the 
United States if the call comes thereafter; provided, however, that credit as de- 
scribed above will be granted only in those courses in which the student is main- 
taining a passing mark at the time of his departure for military service. In the re- 
cording of final grades, for three-fourths of a term or more, both passing and failing 
grades are to be shown on the student's permanent record. 

University Employees 

The spouse or dependent children of any person employed full time by the 
Board of Governors of West Virginia University shall be charged the same fees as 
resident students provided the employee is living in West Virginia. The spouse and 
dependent children of full-time interns, residents, and fellows in the School of Medi- 
cine, School of Dentistry, and University Hospital programs shall also be charged the 
same fees as resident students. 

Service Charge on Returned Checks 

A service charge of 5 per cent of the amount of each check returned unpaid 
by the bank upon which it is drawn shall be collected unless the student can obtain 
an admission of error from the bank. 



10 Tuition, Registration Fee, Athletics Fee, Student Educational Services Fee, Health, 
Counseling Service, and Program Fee, and University Fee. The Student Union Fee and Daily 
Athenaeum Fee are nonrefundable after the eighteenth day following the beginning of General 
Registration. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 23 



II the check returned by the bank was in payment of University and registra- 
tion Fees, the Comptroller's office shall declare the fees unpaid and registration can- 
celled ii the check lias not been redeemed within three days from date of written 
notice. In such a case tlie student may be reinstated upon redemption of the check, 
payment of the 5 per cent service charge, and payment of a late payment fee of 
$10.00. 



COST OF AN ACADEMIC YEAR S WORK 

A student's textbooks will cost approximately $100 a year and his enrollment 
.280 to $434 if he is a resident; or $910 to $1,170 if a nonresident. Students in 
engineering will use drawing instruments costing from $15.00 to $30.00. Non- 
refundable fees range from $2.00 to $20.00. In military science and air force aero- 
space studies a $20.00 deposit is required to cover military equipment in the custody 
of the student, practically all of which is returned to the student when he accounts 
for his equipment. Board and room may be obtained at from approximately $900 to 
$1,000 a year. Traveling expenses, clothing, and other miscellaneous items will de- 
pend largely upon the taste and habits of the individual student. In general, however, 
it may be said that the legitimate cost of a 9-month term of residence at the Univer- 
sity ranges from $1,700 for resident students to $2,450 for nonresident students. 



REGISTRATION 



Persons not registered as University students and who are not members of its 
administrative or teaching staffs shall not be admitted to regular attendance in Uni- 
versity classes. 

All students are expected to register on days set apart for registration at the 
beginning of each semester or session of the University. 

Immediately after completion of registration, all students must pay fees at the 
Comptroller's desk in the Field House Annex (South). 



LATE REGISTRATION 

No student will be permitted to register at the University after the eighteenth 

da\ (if a semester or the fourth day ol the Summer Session or a summer term. 



AUDITORS 

Students may enroll in courses without working lor grade or lor credit by 
tering as auditors and l>y paying lull fees. Change in status from audit to credit 
or from credit to audit maj be made during the registration period. Attendance re- 
quirement I'M auditors shall be determined by the instructor of the course being 
audited. It is the prerogative ol tin instructor to strike the name of an> auditor from 
v report hams and to instinct the registrar to withdraw the auditor From the 

il he should Fail to meet such attendance requirements. 

•/ 



VISITORS 

Full-time University students may attend classes as visitors, provided they ob- 
tain the written permissoin of their advisers and of the instructors in classes they de- 
sire to visit. Members of the administrative or teaching staffs, or other regular em- 
ployees of the University, may attend classes as visitors provided they obtain written 
permission of the chairmen of their departments and of the instructors in the classes 
which they desire to visit. 

No record is kept of the work and attendance of persons admitted to classes 
as visitors and no credit is given for their work in such classes. 

Persons eligible to attend classes in the University as visitors may obtain the 
proper forms from the Registrar. 



EVENING EDUCATION 

The University offers a program of evening classes for the benefit of those 
who wish to continue their education beyond the high-school level and who are un- 
able to attend the usual day classes. 

All courses are taught by resident faculty members and carry full college resi- 
dence credit. Many of these courses may be counted toward advanced degrees. 



INSTRUCTIONAL SCHEDULE 

The University year is divided into two semesters of approximately seventeen 
weeks each and a summer session of ten weeks. 



REGULATIONS AFFECTING DEGREES 

Candidates for degrees are eligible for graduation when they complete the re- 
quirements in the college or school in which they are registered which were in effect 
at the time of their first registration in that college or school, provided they apply 
for graduation within a period of seven years from the time of their first registration. 
Students who fail to complete the requirements for graduation within seven years 
from their first registration shall satisfy the requirements in effect at the time they 
apply for graduation. 

The University Board of Governors has ordered that in view of public and 
professional responsibilities the faculty of each of the professional schools of West 
Virginia University shall have the authority to drop any student from its rolls when- 
ever, by formal decision reduced to writing, the faculty finds that the student is un- 
fitted to meet the qualifications and responsibilities of the profession. 

All degrees are conferred by the Board of Governors upon recommendation of 
the faculties of the various colleges and schools. Degrees are granted at the close 
of the semester or summer session in which the students complete their work. 

Candidates for degrees to be conferred at the close of the second semester 
must be present in person to receive their degrees unless excused by the deans of 
their colleges or schools. No individual may be exempt from the provisions of this 
University regulation except by official action of the Board of Governors. 

REGISTRATIOX 25 



BACCALA I RE ATE DEGREES 

Credits and Grade Points Required 

li SS than (> limns in an ancient or modern language will not be counted to- 
ward any University degree, diploma, or certificate unless work in the same language 
has been offered for entrance. 

Six hours of English composition and rhetoric (English 1 and 2) arc required 
of all candidates lor the Bachelors Degree in all colleges and schools ol the Uni- 
versity. 

Two hours of physical education for men (P.E. 1 and 2). to be taken during 
tlie first year in residence, and lour years of physical education for women, to be 
taken during the first and second years in residence, are required lor graduation. 
except in the case of students entering with advanced standing amounting to 58 
semester hours or more. (See page 27 for specific requirements.) 

Each baccalaurate degree is conditioned upon the completion of a specified 
number of semester hours of credit. For the number of credit hours required for 
each degree, see the last column on pages 32-33. 

All divisions of the University require minimum standards of scholastic quality. 
Grade points are computed only on grades earned at West Virginia I Fniversity (in- 
cluding Potomac State College of West Virginia University). To be eligible for 
graduation, a student must have an average of "C" or an average of two made 
points on ill work for which he received grades (except * \Y". "WT". and "P"). The 
College of Human Resources and Education, in addition to the general average of two 
grade points per credit hour in all subjects, requires an average of two grade points 
per hour of credit in Education and in each teaching field. 

It is the student's responsibility to keep informed ol his made-point standing. 
This information may be obtained at any time from the dean of the college or school 
in which the student is registered. 

University Core Curriculum Requirements 

I. Two semesters' work in English composition, exclusive of English 0. 

(a) Students demonstrating special ability in English will be excused 
from English 1 and 2, the number of students and the mechanics of se- 
lection to rest with the Department of English. 

(b) Xo credit will be granted for courses from which a student is ex- 
cused. 

(c) Students excused from English 1 and 2 will be required to take (J 
hours of other courses, the selection ol same to rest with the student 
with the advice and consent of his adviser. 

II. Remedial work in mathematics to cover the deficiency if the student, 
upon entering the University, lacks proficiency in mathematics equal to 
that normally attained in two years of high school mathematics. 

III. Twelve credit hours ol work in selected approved courses in each of the 

three following disciplinary areas, including courses in at least two sub- 
jects in each group: 

Group A \it foreign languages and literature, including Latin and Greek 
v< the elemental - ) level) literature of the English language; philoso- 
phy religion, humanities. 

Group B: I conomi • iphy history, psychology, political science, social 
i icik e so( Ioli 



Group C: Biological sciences (biology, botany, zoology, genetics), chemistry, 
geology, mathematics, physical sciences, physics. 

Courses taken to fulfill the core curriculum requirements will be selected from 
a list prepared by the University Core Curriculum Committee. The list will include 
one or more courses in each of the above named disciplines and may also include 
both interdisciplinary courses and courses in disciplines closely related to those 
named. Honors courses in the General Education area and administered as a part of 
the University honors program will count toward the Core Curriculum requirements. 
Students in certain curricula, if electing to take Military Science or Air Force Aero- 
space Studies, will be excused from a part of the Core Curriculum requirements at 
the discretion of the President of the University. 



Physical Education General Program 

All students entering the University with less than 58 semester hours of college 
credit are required to complete the requirements in physical education, unless previ- 
ous credit is allowed. All men students take 2 hours of physical education courses, 
Phys. Ed. 1 and 2, during their first year of residence. All women students take 4 
hours of physical education courses during their first two years of residence. Phys. 
Ed. 3 is required of all freshman women. To complete the 4-hour requirement, stu- 
dents elect one course from each of the following groups: 

Group 1-Phys. Ed. 14, 15, 16 (Swimming) 

Group 2-Phys. Ed. 5, 11. 17, 18 (Dancing) 

Group 3-Phys. Ed. 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 21, 25 (Individual or Team Sports) 

The University Health Service will determine whether students are physically 
qualified for required physical education courses and for active participation in other 
University activities. 



English Proficiency Requirement 

Undergraduate Students Entering the University After June 1, 1964, 
Who Are Candidates for an Initial Baccalaureate Degree 

All such students who have completed English 2 at West Virginia University 
or Potomac State College of West Virginia University with less than a "C" grade will 
be required either to retake English 2 and establish a "C" or better grade, or take a 
college-level English proficiency examination to be administered by the English Pro- 
ficiency Board. No student may proceed to the upper division (junior year) until lie 
has attained a "C" or better grade in English 2 at West Virginia University or Poto- 
mac State College or a passing score in the English Proficiency Examination. 

Students for whom English 1 and 2 have been waived by the Department of 
English will not be required to take the English Proficiency Examination. 

Transfer students will be required to take the English Proficiency Examination 
in the first semester of their residence. Those who fail to pass the examination must 
take English 2 at West Virginia University and establish a grade of "C" or better or 
pass the English Proficiency Examination within the first two semesters of their 
residence. Thereafter, they will be ineligible to continue other course work toward 
a degree or to graduate until the English proficiency requirement is satisfied. 

REGULATIONS AFFECTING DEGREES 27 



Undergraduate Students Entering the University Before June 1, 1964, 
Who Are Candidates for an Initial Baccalaureate Degree 

To qualify for graduation, all such students, including transfer students, are 
required either to complete English 2 at West Virginia University with a grade of 
:• better or to pass the English Proficiency Examination. 

The foregoing regulations do not apply to students of foreign countries whose 
native language is other than English. 



Graduation With Honors and High Honors 

Effective June I. L949, the University established the practice of awarding 

"Honors" and "High lienors" to qualified students who are candidates for the initial 
baccalaureate degrees. The following regulations govern these awards: 

1. The computation of the average shall begin with the student's penultimate 
term or semester and continue in reverse chronological order until at least 48 seme 
hours have been counted. If, in order to total the required number of hours it is 
necessary to include any part of a semester or term, the work of the whole semester 
shall be included. 

2. No graduate shall be eligible for honors unless lie shall have completed at 
least half of the semester hours required for his degree in West Virginia University. 

3. Enrollment at the University is required during the senior year. 

4. No graduate shall be eligible for honors if his grade-point average for his 
final semester or term is less than 3.0. 

5. Subject to the above conditions, all candidates for a baccalaureate degree 
whose average, as shown by the portion of the work used, is 3.6 or above, shall 1 < 
graduated with "High Honors." All those whose average is less than 3.6 but 3.3 or 
above, shall be graduated with "Honors." 

6. Fitting recognition of graduation with honors shall be made on the candi- 
diploma and on the commencement program. 



Requirements As to Residence 

Students who come to the University from other colleges or universities 
make the transfer not later than the beginning of their third year and in no ease will 
a student who matriculates in the University later than October 1 in any year be 
permitted to receive a degree at the next commencement. 

In special eases students who desire to leave the University at the close ol 
their third year to enter another institution with the purpose of taking a c mb 
course leading to two degrees or of preparing for graduate study, upon applica 
beforehand to the Committee on Academic Standards of the College or School in 
which they are registered, may be permitted to do the work of the fourth year, or a 

thereof, al such other institution and to receive the Bachelor's Degree from 
University upon the presentation of the proper credits. 

pi in the College of Law, no student will be granted a Bachelor's D 

:\< i ilv who has QOl done either .1 total of 90 hoUTS or tl I lasl 

of his work m actual residence at the University. No student may receive th< D 
ol Doctor oi Jurisprudence without at least three semesters in residence al the Col- 
I I .'\\ and the successful completion of course: ing at l< I! ol 

the total Qumbei "I hours required lor graduation. Except with the permission ol the 

imirtee on Academic standards, the last iT hems ol work must !><• taken in the 
( oll< ge oi I -a of W( ■ \ Li ginia l m\ < i 



College Credit Defined 

A college credit or semester hour represents the amount of work done in one 
recitation hour per week for the duration of a semester. Normally a student will 
spend two hours preparing for an hour recitation period. As a rule, two to three 
hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one hour of recitation. 



Maximum and Minimum Work 

The maximum and minimum number of hours per semester as well as the 
maximum number of hours per year for which a student may register during the 
regular academic year of the University are as follows: 



Agriculture 

Arts and Sciences 

Commerce 

Creative Arts Center 

Dentistry 

Engineering 

Family Resources 

Forestry 

Human Resources and Education . 

Journalism 

Law 

Medicine 

Mines 

Nursing 

Pharmacy 

Physical Education 

A student desiring to do irregular work, more or less than the prescribed num- 
ber of hours in any college, must obtain permission from the Committee on Academic 
Standards in his college or school. This permission is not valid until it has been re- 
ported to the Registrar for record. 



Minimum 


Maximum 






Hours Per 


Hours Per 




Semester 


Semester 


Year 


14 


20 




14 


19 




14 


18 




14 


21 




16 


22 




12 


20 




14 


18 


34 


14 


20 






18 


36 


14 


18 


36 


13 


16 




17 


20 






12 


20 






14 


20 






14 


20 






14 


20 







Work Done Out of Residence 

It is the policy of the University to discourage the taking of regular residence 
courses in absentia. In the case of courses begun at the University and not com- 
pleted because of illness or for other acceptable reasons, however, permission to com- 
plete the work in absentia under the direction of regular University instructors may 
be granted by the Committee on Academic Standards; but in such case credit should 
be given only upon a report of a grade of no less than "C" on final examination. 

This regulation does not apply to University extension courses. 

Approval in writing must be secured in advance from the Registrar to elect 
courses offered elsewhere. An overall average of "C" is required on all work at- 
tempted at the University in order to obtain such approval. Credit will be accepted 
for transfer for courses carrying a grade of "C" or higher when the conditions indi- 
cated above have been met. 

Credit for Correspondence Work 

Credit up to a maximum of 30 semester hours for work completed by cor- 
respondence in non-laboratory courses will be accepted by the University when such 



REGULATIONS AFFECTING DEGREES 



29 



work is given by accredited colleges or universities that accept work for credit to- 
ward their own degrees and whose residence work is accepted by West Virginia Uni- 
\ ersity. 

Substitution for Required Courses 

A .student who desires to substitute another course for any course prescribed 
in his curriculum or required for the degree toward which he is working must obtain 
permission For such substitution from the Committee on Academic Standards in his 
college or school, but there can be no substitution from group to group. 

Withdrawal from Class or University 

A student who desires to withdraw from the University must obtain a with- 
drawal form from the office of the Registrar (or Dean's office of an off-campus in- 
structional unit). Withdrawal procedure will be explained to him at that time. 

A student who withdraws without following this procedure will receive at the 
end of the semester a grade of F (failure) in each of the courses for which he is 
registered and will be indefinitely suspended from the University unless certified as 
to incapacitation by the Dean of his college. 

A student who desires to drop part of his work at anytime following registra- 
tion may withdraw from classes in which he is enrolled with a grade of W until the 
end of the fifth week after the first day of classes; after the fifth week and until 18 
days before the last day of classes of a semester (8th day before last day of classes 
of a session), a grade of W (withdrawal doing satisfactory work) or WU (withdrawal 
doing unsatisfactory work) will be reported. No withdrawal will be permitted after 
the latter date except for withdrawal from the University. (W or WU grades will not 
be used in the computation of the student's grade-point average.) 

Re-Entry After Withdrawal 

Students required to withdraw from one college or school of the University be- 
cause of failure in their work and permitted to transfer to another unit of the Uni- 
versity may not again register in the college or school in which they were originally 
registered without the consent of the Committee on Academic Standards of that col- 
lege or school. 



EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 

Courses 

As a rule courses extend through one semester day only, though some are of 
a year's duration. No credit will be given for less than an entire course except by 
special order of the Committee on Academic Standards. Crades given at the end of 
die first semester in courses extending throughout the year are merely indicative of 
the quality ol work done by the student to that point and do not give credit for the 
part ol the course so far completed. Sue li first -semester grades may be considered in 
determining the final grade, however. 

Examinations 

During the progress oi a eniirse short tests and hour examinations are given 
l>\ the instructor dining regulai recitation or laboratory periods. Final examinations 
are held during the last week ol each semester ol the academic year and during the 

30 



last day of the Summer Session or each term of session. A schedule published in the 
Schedule of Courses each semester sets the time for each final examination. 

The following rules, to be enforced by the Provost for Instruction, pertaining 
to final examinations were adopted by the University Senate, February 13, 1967. 

1. All final examinations must be given according to the schedule published. 

2. The only tests permitted during the week of classes preceding finals will 
be practical laboratory tests, which by their nature must be given in the laboratory. 

3. There shall be a reading period of at least one day between the last day of 
classes and the first day of scheduled examinations. 

4. If a student has more than three final examinations on one day because 
one of them is a departmental final examination, he may take a substitute examina- 
tion for the departmental examination during the reading period. 



Absence from Examinations 

Students are required to take all regular examinations. If a student attends a 
course throughout the semester and is absent from examination without permission, 
the instructor shall count the examination as zero and report the final grade as "F." 
If, in the opinion of the instructor, absence of the student was for satisfactory reason, 
the fact will be recorded, the grade "I" will be returned, and the student may, upon 
application to the instructor, take the examination at a later date. 



Reports 

In the seventh week of classes of each semester, instructors in all under- 
graduate courses shall submit a report of students doing unsatisfactory work, that is, 
earning grades of "D" or "F". These grades are to be used for counseling and are 
not recorded on the student's permanent record in the Registrar's Office. These re- 
ports are to be sent to the Registrar or his representative, and this information shall 
be transmitted to the student, parent or guardian, adviser, and dean of the college. 

Final grades are reported by instructors directly to the Computer Center with- 
in 48 hours after the closing of the examination. The rule also applies to the final 
grades of all students registered in other colleges or schools of the University who 
are enrolled in law courses. 

The final standing of all seniors provisionally approved for graduation at the 
close of the second semester shall be reported by their instructors to the deans of 
their colleges and schools, and the final standing of all graduate students provisionally 
approved for graduation shall be reported to the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Special report cards are supplied by the Registrar. 

A report of each student's work is made at the close of the semester or sum- 
mer session to the student himself or to his parents or guardian. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The following table shows the number of semester hours required for classifi- 
cation as second-year, third-year, and fourth-year students and for graduation in the 
several colleges, schools, and divisions. First-year students must satisfy the require- 
ments as set forth beginning on page 11. 

EXAMINATIONS AND REPORTS 31 



HOURS REQUIRED TO CLASSIFY AS 



COLLEGE AND DEGREE 

Agriculture and Forestry 
B.S. (Bachelor of Science) 
B.S. in Agriculture (B.S.Agr. ) 
B.S. in Forestry (B.S.F.) 

B.S. in Recreation (B.S.Rec.) 
B.S. in Wood Science (B.S.W.S.) 



Second- 


Third- 


Fourth- 


Required 


Year 


year 


Year 


for 


Student 


Student 


Student 


Degree 


30 


58 


96 


L28 


30 


58 


96 


130 


30 


70 


110 


150 


28 


58 


94 


130 


30 


60 


95 


138 



Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) 

Regular 25 58 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Physics 

Statistics 

Commerce 

B.S. in Bus. Ad. (B.S.Bus.) 

B.S. in Economics (B.S.Ec.) 

Creative Arts Center 

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) 

B.A. in Art (A.B.) 

Bachelor of Fine Arts 

in Drama (B.F.A.) 30 64 



92 



134 



34 


69 


103 


136 


32 


58 


99 


134 


34 


69 


103 


136 


25 


58 


92 


134 




58 


92 


128 




58 


92 


128 


30 


64 


102 


132 


30 


64 


102 


132 



102 



132 



Dentistry 

Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) 33 70 106 142 

B.S. in Dental Hygiene (B.S.D.H.) 30 65 101 136 



Engineering 11 

Bachelor of Science 27 

B.S. in Aerospace Eng'g. (B.S.A.E.) 30 

B.S. in Agr'l. Eng'g. (B.S.Agr.E.) 30 

B.S. in Chem. Eng'g. (B.S.Ch.E.) 30 

B.S. in Civil Eng'g. (B.S.C.E.) 30 

B.S. in Elec. Eng'g. (B.S.E.E.) 30 

B.S. in End. Eng'g. (B.S.I.E.) 30 

B.S. in Mech. Eng'g. (B.S.M.E.) 30 



60 
68 

72 
0<S 
68 
OS 
OS 

68 



94 
100 
112 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



133 
135 
145 
134 
147 
141 
143 
1.34 



•Unless dilii'iui.i stated, i minimum <>f L28 hours is required for all degrees awarded by 

tli. College of Arts and Sciences. Tins musi include at least 121 hours exclusive oi required 
Physii al Edu< ation. 

■ Students matriculating with 58 or more hours oi credit may graduate without credit for 

Physical Education, thus reducing die total hours required lor graduation. 



32 



HOURS REQUIRED TO CLASSIFY AS 



COLLEGE AND DEGREE 

Human Resources and Education 12 
B.S. in Elem. Educ. (B. S.E.Ed.) 
B.S. in Secondary Educ. 

(B.S.Sec.Ed.) 
B.S. in Speech Pathology and 

Audiology (B.S.) 

B.S. in Home Economics 

(B.S.H.E.) 

Journalism 

B.S. in Journalism (B.S.J.) 

B.S. in Journalism Educ. (B.S.J.E.) 

Law 

Doctor of Jurisprudence (J.D.) . . . 

Medicine 

Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) 

B.S. in Medical Technology 
(B.S.MecT.Tech.) . . . .' 

Mines 

B.S. in Eng'g. of Mines (B.S.E.M.) 
B.S. in Petroleum Eng'g. 

(B.S.Pet.E.) 

Nursing 

B.S. in Nursing (B.S.Nsg.) 

Pharmacy 

B.S. in Pharmacy (B.S.Pharm.) 

Physical Education 

B.S. in Physical Education 

(B.S.P.E.) 



Second- 


Third - 


Fourth- 


Required 


Year 


Year 


Year 


for 


Student 


Student 


Student 


Degree 




58 


92 


128 




58 


92 


128 


34 


68 


104 


128 




58 


92 


128 




58 


92 


128 




58 


92 


128 



30 



54 



64 



96 



28 



32ft 64ff 



58 



81 



36 


72 


f 


t 


25 


58 


100 


135 


30 


72 


112 


144 


30 


72 


112 


144 



133 



96 



128 



tAt least 3 quarters of clinical work. 
JAt least 7 quarters of clinical work. 

t f 32 hr. 4th year of 5-year program; 64 hr. 5th year of 5-year program. 

12 For the Degrees of Bachelor of Science in Education, at least 10 hours of residence 
work must be in Education. 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 



33 



SCHOLASTIC STANDING AND GRADE POINTS 

Grading System 

A- excellent (given only to students of superior ability and attainment) 

B— good (given only to students who are well above average, but not in the 

highest group) 
C— fair (average students) 
D— poor but passing 
F— failure 
I— incomplete 
YV— withdrawal prior to the end of the fifth week of a semester or with- 
drawal doing satisfactory work thereafter 
WU— withdrawal doing unsatisfactory work (after the fifth week of a semester) 
P— pass (See Pass-Fail Grading below) 
X— auditor, no grade and no credit 

Certain Approved Graduate Courses 

S— Satisfactory 
U— Unsatisfactory (Equivalent to F) 

Pass-Fail Grading 

Certain students may elect to take one course each semester or summer session 
in which the grade earned will be either P (pass) or F (fail). 

To be eligible, the student must be a full-time junior or senior enrolled in a 
baccalaureate program and must not exceed a total of 16 credit hours in courses 
graded by Pass-Fail only. In addition, the course selected for Pass-Fail grading must 
not be closed to undergraduate enrollment, required by the student's major or minor, 
nor part of the University Core Curriculum requirement. 

The selection of a course for Pass-Fail grading must be made at registration 
with the approval of the student's academic adviser and may not be changed after 
the close of the registration period. 

Absences 

Students are obligated to attend all classes, including laboratory sessions, for 
which they are registered. The student who is absent for any reason is responsible 
for work missed. Instructors are expected to report excessive absences to the dean 
and adviser. Students should understand that absences jeopardize their grade or con- 
tinuance in the course. 

Grade Points 

The grade-poinl average is computed on all work for which the student has 
registered, except for the courses with grades of "\V." "WU," "IV and "X" and is 

based on the following grade-point values: 



A 


B 


C 


D 18 


F 


I 


u 


4 


3 


2 


1 












Provided, however, thai when a student receives a grade of "I" and later removes the 
incomplete made, his average grade-poinl standing shall be calculated on the basis 

m| the new grade. 

'lor teacher certification the Student is responsible for every registration in a course for 
which ;i grade ol A, B, (', 1), F, WU, P, <>r I is received. The University grade-point average is 
computed on all w<>ik attempted in all years. 



If the final grade of a student in any course is "F," the student must take the 
course again in residence at the University if he desires to receive credit for it, unless 
the dean of the college or school authorizes the exception. The grade of "I" is given 
when an instructor believes that the course work is unavoidably incomplete or that a 
supplementary examination is justifiable. The grade of "I" must be removed within 
the following semester or the next semester in which the student is in residence, and 
becomes a failure unless special permission is granted by the appropriate Committee 
on Academic Standards to postpone removal. 

Uniform Suspension Regulations 

Any undergraduate student, as defined in the 1966 Faculty Handbook, whose 
total grade-point average is less than 2.00 but whose total grade-point deficiency is 
not large enough to cause him to be suspended, will be notified on his grade report 
from the Registrar that his academic performance is unsatisfactory. Any further 
action or restriction is entirely the prerogative of the individual college. 

Any undergraduate student, as defined in the 1966 Faculty Handbook, with a 
grade-point deficiency which exceeds the maximum allowed by the uniform Uni- 
versity regulation (see Table below) shall be subject to suspension by the dean of 
his college. Academic suspension identifies the status of a student who has failed to 
meet the University minimum standards and who has been notified formally by the 
dean of his college of his academic suspension. A suspended student may not register 
for further work without prior approval of readmission by the Academic Standards 
Committee and the dean of his college. Action on academic suspension is to be taken 
by the appropriate dean at the end of each semester and such action is to be based 
in a special report from the Registrar. The sequence of events in bringing about this 
action is: 

1. The Registrar will provide a special report at grade-reporting time to the 
college deans for appropriate action. 

2. The Registrar will provide the Provost for Instruction with a list of stu- 
dents subject to suspension in each college. 

3. Deans will report to the Provost for Instruction the action taken on the 
students reported to them for suspension by the Registrar. 

4. A dean may suspend a student who fails to meet the requirements of aca- 
demic probation set by the Academic Standards Committee of his college. 

Students who have been suspended may petition the Committee on Academic 
Standards of the college of enrollment after the next March 1st or October 1st to as- 
certain under what conditions, if any, they may be readmitted to that college. 

Maximum Allowable Grade-Point Deficiency 



Total 


Maximum 


Total 


Maximum 


Hours 


Grade-Point 


Hours 


Grade-Point 


Attempted 


Deficiency 


Attempted 


Deficiency 


0-20 


32 


61-65 


13 


21-25 


26 


66-70 


12 


26-30 


20 


71-75 


11 


31-35 


19 


76-80 


10 


36-40 


18 


81-85 


9 


41-45 


17 


86-90 


8 


46-50 


16 


91-95 


7 


51-55 


15 


96 and above 


6 


56-60 


14 







GRADING SYSTEM 



35 



A student suspended for academic reasons who fails to gain readmission to the 
college of his choice shall, upon application, be readmitted after one calendar year 
from the date of suspension, as a Remedial Studies student in the College of Arts 
and Son 

These suspension regulations supersede all other regulations for academic sus- 
pension. 

Duties of Advisers 

Each student on entering the University is assigned to an adviser. It is the 
duty of advisers to assist students in preparing schedules, to assign them to classes, 
and to certify their study lists to the Registrar. The adviser is expected to give to 
students a-siuned to him such advice and sympathetic guidance as they may need in 
the pursuance of their work in the University. Students are expected to go freely to 
their advisers to discuss with them their problems. 

All advisers, upon receipt of reports of excessive numbers of absences, shall 
have conferences with the students concerned and shall make such recommendations 
and adjustments as are desirable and feasible. If the adviser does not find a satisfac- 
tory solution after a conference with the student, he shall report the case to the dean 
of the college or school. 

Duties of Instructors 

Each instructor shall be responsible for keeping an attendance record of stu- 
dents in his classes and shall report an excessive number of absences to the student's 
dean and his adviser. 

Duties of Committee on Academic Standards 

The Committee on Academic Standards shall have authority to proceed ac- 
cording to its best judgment in regard to students referred to it for consideration. 

All orders of the committee shall become effective when approved by the 
dean of the college or school. 

In the exercise of its authority the committee shall not suspend a student dur- 
ing a semester except for willful neglect and in cases where the student's class grades 
are so low that further class attendance would be a waste of time. No suspension 
si i. ill become effective until approved by the dean of the college. 



IDENTIFICATION CARD 

An identification card is issued to each full-time student upon paying full fees. 
It entitles the owner to admission to certain University athletic events, various ac- 
tiviti< is ol student government, Health Service, and Mountainlair. Confiscation will 
result from misuse. The University reserves the right to refuse reissuance of an 
identification card. 



PROCEDURAL RULES FOR HANDLINC CHEATING CASES 

Cheating is condemned at all levels and in all areas of life. Like a crippling 
malady, it leaves its mark subjectively. Cheating indicates a weakness and inability 
t" meet and la< <• the issues and problems of life. It creates an atmosphere of mis- 
trust, disrespect and insecurity. The effects and influence of cheating will necessarily 
be reflected is commerce and government and in all of the professions anil callings, 

.is well is in the classroom and in the home. Students of the University should act to 
discourage and eliminate cheating ol every kind and character lor the moral and 

■Vi 



mental well-being of themselves and their fellow men. Likewise, the teaching faculty 
should remove and eliminate every situation which provides avenues and opportuni- 
ties for cheating, thereby contributing to the inculcation of the principles of honesty, 
integrity, self-reliance and self-respect of the students. It is expected that University 
officials will have little occasion to place in operation the established procedures for 
handling cheating cases. Through these procedures and by means of a continued 
awareness, on the part of both the faculty and the students, of the intellectually and 
morally weakening effects of cheating, a healthy strengthening of the moral fiber of 
the University may be envisioned and accomplished. 

Cheating may be defined as including: 

1. Obtaining help from another student during examination. 

2. Knowingly giving help to another student during examination. 

3. The use of notes, books, or any other unauthorized sources of information 
during examination. 

4. Obtaining, without authorization, an examination or any parts thereof prior 
to taking of the examination. 

5. Submitting a report, notebook, speech, outline, theme, or other problem 
for credit that has been knowingly obtained or copied in whole or in part from an- 
other individual's academic composition, compilation or other product. 

6. Submitting or participating in the submission of a report or examination 
paper falsely represented as being the result of the original efforts of the submitting 
student. 

7. Altering the record of any grade in any gradebook, office, or other record. 

8. Any other type of misconduct, offense, or manifestation of dishonesty or 
unfairness in or relating to the academic work. 

The deans of the several colleges and schools shall have the authority and 
shall be responsible for the handling of cheating cases arising or occurring within 
their respective colleges or schools. 

Each member of the teaching faculty and all other University employees, in- 
cluding but not limited to assistants, proctors, office personnel, janitors and night 
watchmen, shall promptly report, via the department chairman or immediate superior, 
if any, each known case of cheating, as hereinbefore defined, to the dean of the 
college or school concerned. 

Each case of cheating shall be handled with dispatch, and the dean shall 
promptly report thereon in writing to the President and shall at the same time place 
a copy of such report in the permanent record of the student concerned and forward 
another copy thereof to the Dean of Student Educational Services for his permanent 
records. In all cheating cases involving women students, an additional copy of such 
report shall be forwarded to the Associate Dean of Student Educational Services. The 
report shall include a brief statement covering the facts and circumstances of the 
case and the discipline applied or recommended. 

In cases wherein cheating occurs in a college or school other than that in 
which the student is registered, the minimum penalty, as prescribed in the paragraph 
below, shall be applied by the dean of the college in which the cheating occurred. 
In handling such cases the dean shall follow the procedure in the above paragraph 
and then immediately refer the case, by transmittal of a copy of the report thereon 
as prescribed in the above paragraph, to the dean of the college or school in which 
the student involved is registered. The purpose of this copy of the report is for in- 
formation and for imposition or recommendation of such further discipline or penalty 
as may be warranted. Upon completion of his review of and action on the case, the 
dean of the college or school in which the student is registered shall thereupon com- 
pose his independent written report on the case and transmit same to the President 
and otherwise distribute copies thereof as provided in the above paragraph. 

ADVISERS 37 



The cleans and their respective teaching faculties shall take remedial and pre- 
ventive steps to remove every opportunity lor any situation conducive to cheating. 
Particular attention shall be given to the maintenance of a high level of proctoring 
in those colleges, schools and departments wherein proctoring is employed and to 
security againsl student access to or knowledge of examination and test materials 
prior to the time of the intended use thereof for student examination and testing 
purposes. The deans shall exercise their independent discretion as to methods and 
means of accomplishing these ends and ma) emplo) thereof faculty meetings, written 
instructions. (ir other effective devices and measures. 

The minimum penalty for all cases of cheating shall he dismissal from the 
course and the establishment of a made of "Failure'" in the course, as of the date of 

cheating, unless in the opinion of the dean there arc extenuating circumstanci s which 
might indicate the advisability of a lesser penalty. 

For a second or subsequent cheating offense, in addition to failure in the 
ionise, suspension or expulsion of the student shall be recommended by the dean for 
the President's action. The office of the Dean of Student Educational Services shall 
maintain its records of reports in cheating cases so as to detect and ascertain promptly 
and accurately the occurrence of second or subsequent cheating offenses and. upon 
inquiry by the dean, shall promptly advise whether the student has been guilty ol 
any prior cheating offense or offenses. 

Suspension or expulsion of a student guilty of cheating may, in first offense 
cases, be recommended by the dean to the President if the facts and circumstances 
of the case so warrant or the rules, regulations or policy of the college or school con- 
( erned so require. 

In cheating cases involving criminal offenses, such as theft of examination or 
test materials, alteration of records, breaking or entering buildings, offices, desks, 
safes, or filing cabinets, damage to public property and other like or similar mis- 
conduct, the academic penalties and discipline as herein prescribed shall be applied 
and in addition thereto the dean of the college or school concerned shall with the 
approval of the President, cause the facts of each case to be presented to the Prose- 
cuting Attorney of Monongalia County, Wesl Virginia, for his further investigation 
and for prosecution by injunction or otherwise as may be warranted. Upon the issu- 
.(!!(.• of .1 warrant for or the return of an indictment against a student on account of 
any such offense, the President shall suspend such student from the University pend- 
ing final prosecution thereon. If the student be acquitted ni the offense, his suspen- 
sion may be vacated, but if convicted of the offense, he shall be expelled from the 
University. 

A student may appeal from the decision of action of a dean in a cheating case 

to the President for review and reconsideration and the President may thereupon 

affirm or reverse, in whole, or in part, the decision or action of the dean. 

In his action on any cheating case, whether on appeal by a student or on 

recommendation or reference by a dean, the President may consider the case record 
before him, may further investigate or cause to be investigated the facts and circum- 
stances "f the ease, and may act personally thereon and dispose thereof, or he may, in 
his discretion refer the case to another appropriate University office, committee or 
igencj l"i review, investigation, consideration and recommendation prior to his final 
a< (ion tin reon and disposition then of. 

It is recommended that, in all phases of cheating cases, care and eaution be 

observed so ,is to avoid accusation or charge of cheating or related impropriety 

which ma) be without foundation. \ lake accusation may have serious implications 

and resull in reflection on oi harm to an innocent and unoffending student and dis- 

■ m dii to the faculty. 



38 



Part III / Curricula and Courses 



ABBREVIATIONS 

The following abbreviations are used in the descriptions of courses: 
I— a course given in the first semester. 
II— a course given in the second semester. 
I, II— a course given in each semester. 
I and II— a course given throughout the year. 

S— a course given in the Summer Session, 
hr.— number of credit hours per course, 
consent— consent of instructor required. 
PR:— prerequisite. 



PLAN FOR NUMBERING COURSES 

For convenience each course of study is designated by the name of the de- 
partment in which it is given and by the number of that course. The plan for num- 
bering is as follows: 

Courses 1 to 99— courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 

Courses 100 to 199— courses intended primarily for juniors and seniors. 

Courses 200 to 299— advanced courses for juniors, seniors, and graduates. 



SEMESTER COURSE SCHEDULES 

Before the opening of each semester, a schedule is printed announcing the 
courses that will be offered by the colleges, schools, and divisions of the University. 



39 



The College of Agriculture and Forestry 

ADMINISTRATION 

Robert S. Dunbar. Jr.. Ph.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture and Forestry and 

Professor of Animal Scienct . 
Homer C. Evans, Ph.D., Associate Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station 

and Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
A. H. VanLandingham, Ph.D., Associate Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Forestry, Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station, and Professor of 

Agricultural Biochemistry 
David E. White, Ph.D., Director of the Division of Forestry and Associate Professor 

of Forest Economics. 



The College of Agriculture and Forestry educates people to manage soil, water, 
plants, animals, and forests. The management of these resources involves practically 
all walks of life . . . and the person trained in the broad fields of agriculture and 
forestry is equipped to meet the exciting challenges in these fields and in closely 
allied areas in business, industry, and government. Agriculture and Forestry are 
simple words in themselves, but at WVU they have special and unique meanings. 

Agriculture— Agriculture is far more than farming, the meaning main- people 
traditionally attach to the word. Agriculture is America's number-one industry. 
Nearly one-third of all the productivity-employed people in America are engaged in 
some phase of agriculture! Farming, however, is the basic segment of agriculture. 
There are 6.5 million workers on 3.5 million farms in the United States. The Ameri- 
can farmer supplies food for himself and 31 other persons. Yet agriculture reaches 
beyond farming. It also includes suppliers of feed, fertilizer, chemicals, seeds, ma- 
chinery, tools, buildings, petroleum products, electric service 1 , and other items neces- 
sary in farming. These enterprises employ 6 million workers and supply services and 
farm products worth $41 billion annually. 

Agriculture graduates are also engaged in hundreds of other jobs in industry, 
finance, engineering, transportation, communications, government, education, recrea- 
tion, and other fields. Job opportunities in agriculture are unlimited. 

Agriculture is science and education at work for the well-being of the world. 
Look around you and you're apt to find an agriculture or forestry graduate any- 
where ... a landscape architect at work in eity or country; a chemist in industry or 
government service; a high school or college teacher; a government economist; a 
large farm manager or farm owner; a worker for the betterment of life in emerging 
nations throughout the world; a county agricultural agent; a soil scientist; a re- 
searcher; a veterinarian; a businessman. . . 

/ orestry— The field of forestry also is very broad. The professional forester's 
work includes such diversified activities as timber production, logging, surveying, 
timber estimating, park management, forest protection, forest-stand improvement, 
flood control, watershed protection, soil erosion control, submarginal land develop- 
ment, restoration of game, forest-game management, stream development, lumber dry- 
lain operation, plywood and furniture manufacture, timber preservation, construction 
of public camps and summer homesites, and recreation. 

There arc now more than 20,000 professional foresters in the United States. 
and the need for additional foresters increases each year. 

Students in the College ol Agriculture and Forestr) Study and work under an 

outstanding faculty. Most ol th< faculty members hold joint appointments in the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, where the) are constantly engaged in important 
basic and applied research . . . activities that help them to keep abreast of advances 
being made in their fields, ["his in turn the> pass on to their students. 

40 



HISTORY 

The College of Agriculture and Forestry is organized into three divisions- 
Agriculture, Forestry, and the Agricultural Experiment Station. The Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service, established in 1913, is also closely allied with the College. 

The College of Agriculture was established as a distinct college in the Uni- 
versity in 1895. The Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1888 and be- 
came part of the College in 1895. A four-year course in forestry was added in 1937. 

The College has undergone many changes over the years— all designed to up- 
grade instruction and to keep in tune with the ever-changing trends in agriculture 
and forestry. 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

The College of Agriculture and Forestry offers 16 general programs of study- 
nine in agriculture and seven in forestry. 

Students in agriculture may pursue courses leading to a broad education that 
can prepare them for a variety of careers, or they can specialize in such areas as 
Agricultural Education, Agricultural Mechanics, Agronomy (Forage and Grain Crops, 
Soil Science, and Conservation), Animal Science and Industry (Dairy, Livestock, and 
Poultry), Horticulture (Ornamentals, Fruits, Vegetables, and Soils). 

The College also offers programs in Agribusiness, Landscape Architecture, and 
Pre-Veterinary Medicine. 

Much of the emphasis in the College is placed on preparing students for work 
in graduate and professional schools. For example, the Bachelor of Science curriculum 
provides the student an opportunity to gain the necessary background in preparation 
for such study. 



FACILITIES 

The College of Agriculture and Forestry is located in new buildings on the 
WVU Evansdale Campus. The Agricultural Sciences Building, completed in 1960, 
houses all departments of the Division of Agriculture with the exception of Plant 
Pathology and Bacteriology, which is located in Brooks Hall on the Downtown Cam- 
pus. The Agricultural Mechanics segment of the College's program is taught in the 
Agricultural Engineering Building. The Division of Forestry is located in the Forestry 
Center (completed in 1965). 

These facilities include specially designed classrooms and laboratories, faculty 
and graduate student offices, student lounges, and reading rooms. The Agricultural 
Sciences Building also has a spacious auditorium, cafeteria, and complete and modern 
meat laboratory and creamery. Two new horticulture greenhouses for research and 
study purposes are located within a few steps of the building. Plant Pathology green- 
houses are located on the Downtown Campus. The Agriculture-Engineering Library 
is located in the Engineering Sciences Building, about a two-minute walk from the 
Agricultural Sciences Building. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station, the research arm of the College, is also 
located in the Agricultural Sciences Building. From this base the College extends its 
research functions all over the state. For example, the College has 900 acres of land 
for research farms within a short distance of the University campus. This land is 
divided into five farms— dairy, livestock, horticulture, agronomy, and poultry— with 
modern farm and special buildings for classroom, experiment, and laboratory work. 

Branch experiment stations are maintained at key locations throughout the 
state: 

Wardensville— Reymann Memorial Experimental Farms was established in 
1917. This 987-acre farm, located on the Cacapon River in Hardy County, is operated 
on an experimental basis involving pasture improvement, erosion control, soil re- 
building, water conservation, irrigation, crops, beef cattle, sheep, and poultry. 

AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 41 



Point Pleasant— This 150-acre tract, known as the Ohio Valley Experiment 
Farm, is located on the Ohio River. It was acquired by WVU in 1948 and is operated 
as a unit for experimental work in tobacco and truck and field crops of special interest 
to farmers of the Ohio and Kanawha valleys. 

Kearneysville— The University Experiment Farm, 158 acres in the eastern sec- 
tion iA West Virginia, was established in 1930 for the study of problems relating to 
fruit production, including insect and disease control, as well as problems of general 
farming typical to that section. 

Reedsville— The Reedsville Experiment Farm consists of 475 acres in Preston 
County. Research is conducted there on potatoes, ornamentals, small fruits, corn and 
legumes in rotations, and livestock. 

The College also maintains much forest land throughout the State— experi- 
mental and teaching laboratories of the Division of Forestry. The University Farm 
Woods, 100 acres of mature timber, is only two miles from the campus. A recent 
acquisition, the 2,100-acre A. C. Hoyt Experimental Forest is situated in Wetzel 
County, only an hour's drive from Morgantown. 

The College has a long-term lease for the West Virginia University Forest, a 
7,500-acre tract of the 13,000-acre Coopers Rock State Forest, less than 10 miles from 
the University. Other major tracts are located at Dailey and in Mingo County. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students in the College gain valuable learning and practical experiences out- 
side the classroom and laboratory through participation in what is popularly called 
"extracurricular" activities. A variety of such activity is available to students at both 
College and University levels. 

Some activities are closely associated with classroom work— for example, the 
College judging teams. These teams compete with judging teams from all over the 
United States. Teams open to students who qualify are dairy cattle, dairy products, 
flower, fruit, livestock, meats, soil, and vegetable. 

Students may join one or more of several service clubs in the College, in- 
cluding: 

Blade and Spade Club— open to all students interested in crop and soil 
sciences. 

Block and Bridle Club—iox students majoring in animal science or those with 
an interest in that field. 

University 4-H Club— for all students interested in upholding 4-H ideals. 

Dairy Science Club—iov students interested in furthering their knowledge in 
dairy production and foods. 

Forestry Club— forms an important part of each forestry student's program. 

Honorary and professional organizations in the College are: 

Alpha Tau Alpha— national agricultural education professional honorary fra- 
ternity. 

Alpha Zeta—an honorary agricultural fraternity for agriculture and forestry 
students, instituted in the College in 1921. 

Gamma Sigma Delta— the honor society of agriculture. Outstanding individuals 
of tli< senior (lass, graduate students, faculty and alumni of the College are elected 
to membership by the faculty. 

\i Sigma Pi— national forestry honorary fraternity. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers— open to agricultural mechanics 
students. 

Collegiate Chapter of Inline Farmers of America— [or all former FFA mem- 
ben .Hid students preparing to teach vocational agriculture. 

Student Society of Landscape Architecture— open to landscape architecture 

Students and an\ Universit) student who is actively interested in that field. 

West Virginia University Student Chapter of the Soil Conservation Society of 
America mi mbership open to any full-time student in the University. 

Society Of American I'orcsters- professional forestry society. 



Ag. Council— open to all students interested in the betterment of agriculture. 
It is the combining club for all students in agriculture. 

College of Agriculture and Forestry students are eligible to join University- 
wide student organizations. In addition, the College is represented in the Student 
Legislature. All students are eligible to participate in committee work through student 
government and Mountainlair, the student activities center. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 

FACULTY 

Agricultural Biochemistry (an interdepartmental faculty group) 

George A. McLaren, Ph.D., Chairman of Faculty of Agricultural Biochemistry and 
Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry and Agricultural Biochemist. 

James L. Brooks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry. 

Luther M. Ingle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture and Agricultural Bio- 
chemistty and Associate Horticulturist. 

William G. Martin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry and 
Assistant Agricultural Biochemist. 

Homer Patrick, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry and Agricultural Bio- 
chemist. 

Robert L. Reid, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Nutrition and Agricultural Bio- 
chemistry and Associate Nutritionist. 

David A. Stelzig, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry. 

Valentin Ulrich, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Agricultural Biochemistry and 
Geneticist. 

Alley E. Watada, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture and Agricultural Bio- 
chemistry and Associate Horticulturist. 

Agricultural Economics 

Kenneth D. Mcintosh, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics and Associate Agricultural Economist. 

Victor F. Amann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Alfred L. Barr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Associate 
Agricultural Economist. 

James H. Clarke, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural 
Economist. 

Homer C. Evans, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Econ- 
omist; Associate Director of Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Anthony Ferrise, M.S., Instructor and Area Extension Specialist— Resource Develop- 
ment, Keyset Appalachian Center. (On study leave). 

Robert L. Jack, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics and Associate 
Agricultural Economist. 

Ralph E. Nelson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics (WVU Con- 
tract, Kampala, Uganda). 

Ernest J. Xesius, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Economics; Vice-President— Off- 
Campus Education. 

Paul E. Nesselroad, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Assistant 
Agricultural Economist. 

James L. Stallings, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics (WVU Con- 
tract, Morogoro, Tanzania). 

AGR/Cl/LTC/RE 43 



Ronald L. Stump. M.S.. Acting Dean, Appalachian Center; Acting Director, Coopera- 
tiit Extension Si nice; Assistant Professor; Director— Program Implementation. 
Appalachian Center. 

Mary C. Templeton, M.S., Research Assistant in Agricultural Economics. 

George E. Toben, M.S., Professor of Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Econ- 
omist. 

F. Wayne Weber, M.S., Agricultural Research Economist, Economic Research Service, 
United States Department of Agriculture. 

Virgil L. Whetzel, B.S.Agr., Agricultural Research Economist, Economic Research 
Service, United States Department of Agriculture. 

Agricultural Education 
Russell C. Butler, Ph.D., Professor and CJmirman of Agricultural Education and Pro- 
fessor of Education. 
Paul V. Armbrester, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education and Assistant 

Director of International Programs. 
Lenrod L. Blowe, B.S., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, Kenya. 
Robert H. Burns, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, Kenya. 
Roy F. Dick, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, Kenya. 
John J. Harvey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education, and Director, 

Agricultural Education, Egerton College, Kenya. 
Frederick P. Holmes, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, Morogoro Agricultural 

College, Tanzania. 
Oscar C. Hutchinson, Jr., M.S., Assistant Professor; Area Director, Beckley Area 

Appalachian Center. 
Thomas O. Kajer, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, Kenya. 
Warren G. Kelly, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and Education. 
William I. Lindley, M.S., Instructor in Vocational Agriculture, and Acting Chief of 

Party, Vocational Agriculture Project, Kenya. 
O. Claude McGhee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education and 

Education. 
Robert H. Maxwell, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education and Chief of 

Party, Vocational Agriculture Project, Kenya. (On leave). 
Joseph L. Morris, M.S.Agr., Assistant Professor; Area Director, Morgantown Area 

Appalachian Center. 
Foster G. Mullenax, B.S.Agr., M.S.J., Instructor; State Extension Specialist— Learning 

Resources, Appalachian Center. 
Dickson W. Parson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Education. 
Charles I. Rhodes, M.S., Research Assistant. 

Agricultural Engineering 

A. D. Longhouse, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Engineering 
and Agricultural Engineer. 

Waldo E. Bell, B.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering; State Ex- 
tension Agricultural Engineering Specialist. (Retired). 

Edmond B. Collins, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 
Chief of Party. (Egerton College, Njoro, Kenya). 

Chester A. Cromer, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering (Tan- 
zania Agricultural College, Morogoro, Tanzania). 

Waller H. Dickerson, P.E., M.S.Ag.E., Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 
A litultural Engineer. 

Robert (;. Diener, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering and Assis- 
tant Agricultural Engineer. 

William B. Easley, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. (Arapai Agricultural 
College, Uganda). 

44 



Kendall C. Elliott, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 

Assistant Agricultural Engineer. 
Roy E. Emerson, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering and Associate 

Agricultural Engineer. 
Gordon E. Ferguson, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. (Arapai Agricultural 

College, Uganda). 
Charles R. Grafton, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. (Eger- 

ton College, Njoro, Kenya). 
Mylo A. Hellickson, M.S.Ag.E., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering and Research 

Assistant. 
Dennis E. Kluver, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. (Bukalasa Agricultural 

College, Uganda). 
Arthur W. Selders, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 

State Extension Specialist— Agricultural Engineering. 
John L. Wagner, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. (Eger- 

ton College, Kenya). 
Robert O. Weedfall, M.S.E., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering. ( Climatologist 

stationed with Department of Agricultural Engineering in cooperation with 

U. S. Weather Bureau). 

Agronomy and Genetics 

Collins Veatch, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy and Acting Chairman of Agronomy and 
Genetics; Agronomist. 

Freddie L. Alt, B.S.Agr., Instructor in Agronomy and Farm Superintendent. 

Newton M. Baughman, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist; Director, In- 
ternational Programs. 

Orus L. Bennett, M.S., Research Soil Scientist, USDA Cooperator, Agronomy and 
Genetics. 

O. J. Burger, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy and Assistant to Provost— Instruction. 

Edwin Colburn, M.S., Research Assistant. 

Carl F. Engle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Agronomy and State Extension Special- 
ist—Soil Science. 

Everett M. Jencks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy and Assistant Agronomist. 

Gerald A. Jung, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist. 

Joseph W. Kaczmarczyk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genetics and Assistant 
Geneticist. 

Joginder Nath, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Farrell Olsen, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor. (Assigned to Makerere University, 
Kampala, Uganda). 

G. Gordon Pohlman, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy; Agronomist. 

Clifford D. Porter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy and State Extension 
Specialist— Agronomy. 

George Sharpe, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy and State Extension Special- 
ist—Soil Conservation. 

Soh Chao Shih, Ph.D., Research Associate. 

Rabindar N. Singh, Ph.D., Research Associate. 

Richard M. Smith, Ph.D., Visiting Professor of Agronomy and Agronomist. 

Charles B. Sperow, M.S., Associate Professor of Agronomy. (Bukalasa Agricultural 
College, Bombo, Uganda). 

Valentin Ulrich, Ph.D., Professor of Genetics and Geneticist. 

Willem A. van Eck, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Soil Science. (Makerere University, 
Kampala, Uganda). 

Ronald Wolfe, M.S., Assistant Agronomist, Ohio Valley Farm. 

AGRICULTURE 45 



Animal Industry and Veterinary Science 

Marvin R. McClung, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Animal Industry and Veteri- 
nary Science and Animal Scientist. 
O. |. Abbott. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Poultry Science ( Makerere University, 

Kampala, Uganda >. 
Hiiliard A. Aekerman, M.S.. Assistant Professor of Dairy Science and Assistant Dairy 

Scientist. 
('.(laid C. Anderson, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science and Animal Husbandman. 
C.ul E. Carlson, B.S., Research Technician. 
C. J. Cunningham, St., B.S.Agr., Animal Husbandman in Charge, Reymann Memorial 

Farms, Wardensville. 
Susan Cuppett, B.S., Research Assistant. 
Leslie Dozsa, D.V.M., Associate Professor of Veterinary Science and Associate Animal 

Patliologist. 
Robert S. Dunbar, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science; Dean of College of Agri- 

culture and Forestry. 
Joseph C. Emch, M.S., Assistant Professor and State Extension Specialist— Animal 

Science. 
Jack M. Gay, M.S., Instructor in Veterinary Science. (Veterinary Training Institute, 

Entebbe, Uganda). 
James T. Guill, M.S., Assistant Professor and State Extension Sjxcialist— Animal 

Husbandry. 
Hush C. Hatch, B.S., Dairy Farm Manager. 
James O. Heishman, B.V.Sc, V.S., Associate Animal Pathologist, Reymann Memorial 

Farms, Wardensville. 
Donald J. Horvath, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science and Animal Husbandman. 
Harold M. Hyre. M.S., Associate Professor of Poultry Science and Associate Poultry 

Scientist. 
E. Keith Inskeep, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science and Associate Animal 

Scientist. 
William T. Jones, B.S., Poultry Farm Manager. 
Robert (). Kelley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and State Extension Specialist— Dairy 

Science. 
Philip L. Kelly, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Science. (Makerere University, Kampala, 

Uganda). 
Harold E. Kidder, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science and Animal Husbandman, 
Edwin A. Linger, B.S., Livestock Farm Manager. 
James 1.. McBee, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Science and Associate 

Animal Husbandman. 
George A. McLaren, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry and Agricultural 

Biochemist. 
Willi. mi ( '.. Martin Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry and 

Associate Agricultural Biochemist. 
Byron W. Moore. M.S. Assistant Piofessor and State Extension Specialist— Poultry 

Science. 

Norman o. Olson. D.Y.M.. Professor of Veterinary Science and Veterinarian. 

Homei Patrick, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry and Agricultural Bio- 
chemist. 

Ronald A. Peterson. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science and Assistant Poul- 
try Scientist. 
Robert I.. Reid, Ph.D., Professoi of Animal Science and Nutritionist. 



16 



John H. Rietz, D.V.M., Professor Emeritus of Veterinary Science and Animal Path- 
ology. 

John R. Schabinger, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Area Extension Specialist— Dairy 
Science. 

LaMont W. Smith, M.S., Instructor and Research Assistant in Animal Science. 

Paul M. Smith, M.S., Instructor in Dairy Science. 

Daniel P. Solomon, D.V.M., Research Associate. 

Robert W. Taber, B.S., Instructor and Farm Superintendent. 

William V. Thayne, M.S., Instructor and Research Assistant in Dairy Science. 

Roy O. Thomas, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dairy Science and Assistant Dairy 
Scientist. 

A. H. VanLandingham, Ph.D., Director of Agricultural Experiment Station; Associate 
Dean of College of Agriculture and Forestry; Professor of Agricultural Bio- 
chemistry. 

Benjamin W. Wamsley, Jr., M.S., Assistant Professor and State Extension Special- 
ist—Animal Science. 

Samuel J. Weese, M.A., Associate Professor of Dairy Science and Associate Dairy 
Scientist. 

Raul Weiss, D.V.M., Research Associate. 

James A. Welch, Ph.D., Professor of Animal Science and Animal Husbandman. 

Frank E. Woodson, D.V.M., Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. (Veterinary 
Training Institute, Entebbe, Uganda). 

Horticulture 

Eion G. Scott, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Horticulture and Horticulturist. 

Bradford C. Bearce, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Horticulture and Assistant Horti- 
culturist. 

James L. Brooks, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry. 

Linda Butler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Assistant Entomologist. 

William H. Childs, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture and Horticulturist. 

Clifford W. Collier, Jr., M.L.A., Assistant Professor and State Extension Landscape 
Architect. 

C. K. Dorsey, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Entomologist. 

Arthur P. Dye, M.S., Associate Professor of Horticulture and Associate Horticulturist 
(Retired). 

Donald W '. Girouard, M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

N. Carl Hardin, Jr., M.S., Associate Professor and State Extension Specialist— Horti- 
culture. 

Clinton E. Hickman, M.S., Assistant Horticulturist and Superintendent, Ohio Valley 
Farm. 

Michael R. Hodges, M.S.. Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

John F. Hyde, M.S., Instructor in Hortiadture. 

Luther M. Ingle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture and Associate 

Horticulturist. 
Joseph J. Lalli, M.L.A., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 
George W. Longenecker, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 
Ray S. Marsh, A.M., Professor Emeritus of Horticulture and Horticulturist Emeritus. 
Oliver M. Xeal, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture and Horticulturist. 
Oscar E. Schubert, Ph.D., Professor of Horticulture and Horticulturist. 
David A. Stelzig, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Biochemistry. 
LeRoy P. Stevens, M.S., Assistant Horticulturist and Farm Superintendent, Reedsville 

Experiment Farm. 

AGRICULTURE 47 



Alley E. Watada, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Horticulture and Associate Horti- 
culturist. 

i Young, Ph.D.. Research Fruit Specialist, KearneysviUe. 

Plant Pathology and Bacteriology 

IP P. Barnett, Ph.D., Chairman of Plant Pathology and Bacteriology; Professor of 
Mycology and Mycologist. 

Robert E. Adams. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and Associate Plant 
Pathologist. 

Joseph G. Barrat, Ph.D., Associate Professor; State Extension Spray Specialist. 

Edward S. Elliott, Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology and PUint Pathologist. 

Mannon E. Gallegly, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology and Plant Pathologist. 

Edwin Gould, B.S., Entomologist in Charge, University Experiment Farm, Kearneys- 
viUe. 

John A. Koburger, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Bacteriology and Associate Bacteri- 
ologist. 

J. G. Leach, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology and Plant Pathologist 
Emeritus. 

Virgil G. Lilly, Ph.D.. Professor of Physiology and Physiologist. 

David O. Quinn, M.S.. State Program Leader— Safe Use of Pesticides. 

R. Philip True. Ph.D., Professor of Plant Pathology and Plant Pathologist. 

Harold A. Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Bacteriologist. 

Jack B. Wilson, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Plant Pathology and Entomology. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



Students in the College ol Agriculture and Forestry must comply with Uni- 
versity regulations dealing with scholarship. Specific regulations that apply to the 
College arc described in the following sections. 



STUDENT PETITIONS 

L. Petitions may l>c submitted to the Committee on Academic Standards: 
(a) to register for more than maximum hours regularly allowed; (b) to register for less 
than minimum load: (c) to drop courses after the regular withdrawal date: (d) for re- 
entry alter scholastic suspension, and (e) to transfer into the College with a grade- 
point deficiency accumulated in another college. 

2. Petitions should he prepared on special forms and must include the recom- 
mendation ol the student's adviser. 

3. Barring unusual and unforeseen circumstance's, a student is under obligation 
to complete the courses in which registration was made. Failure in a course at mid- 

emester does not constitute a reason for withdrawal. 

1 Students may appear in person before the Committee on Academic Stan- 
dards in support of their petition. 

5 Students may appeal decisions ol their adviser. Academic Standards Com- 
mittee, and Division Director to the Dean. 

6. students should submi! petitions at an early date. Delay may result in 
il because sufficienl evidence ma) not be available. 

18 



Notice of the recommendation by the Committee on Academic Standards re- 
garding a petition, after approval by the Dean, shall be sent to the student, to his 
adviser, and the Director of the Division in order that the report can be filed with 
the student's scholastic records. 



GRADE-POINT DEFICIENCIES 

Academic Warning 

A student with a grade-point deficiency which is not so large as to cause sus- 
pension shall be placed on academic warning. Each student shall be advised in 
writing of his academic status by the Dean and referred to the appropriate Division 
Director for additional counsel and guidance. Copies of the letter shall be sent to 
the parent or guardian, the adviser, the Director, and the official file of the student. 

A student with a grade-point deficiency shall not enroll for more than fifteen 
hours. 

Academic Probation 

Students who have been reinstated after suspension and students who have 
transferred from another college with less than a 2.00 grade-point average shall be 
placed on academic probation until their grade-point deficiency is reduced to a level 
less than the minimum allowable without suspension. At such time the student will 
be reassigned to an adviser by the appropriate Division Director. 

While on academic probation a student shall be required to maintain a mini- 
mum grade-point average of 2.25 in order not to be suspended. 

The Chairman of the Committee on Academic Standards shall serve as adviser 
to all students on academic probation. 

Academic Suspension 

Any student whose grade-point deficiency exceeds the maximum allowed by 
these regulations shall be subject to suspension. The student shall be notified of sus- 
pension in writing by the Dean. Copies of the letter shall be sent to the Registrar, 
Director of Residence Halls, the appropriate Division Director, the parent or guard- 
ian, the adviser, and the official file of the student. 

Any student on academic probation whose grade-point average at the end of a 
period of enrollment is less than 2.25 for that period of enrollment shall be sus- 
pended. Letters of notification shall be distributed as described above. 

Students who have been suspended are advised to petition the Committee on 
Academic Standards after March 1 or October 1 to ascertain under what conditions, 
if any, they may be reinstated. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The curriculum in science, with its flexible design, will provide the student 
with the opportunity to acquire the necessary background in mathematics, chemistry, 
physics, and modern concepts of biology in preparation for professional or graduate 
study. Selection of individual courses is the responsibility of the student in consulta- 
tion with his adviser. The student must complete a minimum of two courses each in 
biology, chemistry, and physics and must complete mathematies through calculus. 
The pre-professional student may substitute chemistry for calculus to meet degree 
requirements. 

AGRICULTURE 49 



Requirements Hours 

English Composition and Rhetoric (or conformity with 

University English requirements) 6 

Arts and Humanities (Group A) 12 

Social and Behavioral Sri. mis (Group B) 12 

Natural Sciences* (Group C included) 40 

A minimum of two courses in each of biology, chemistry, 
physics and mathematics through calculus is required.) Ex- 
clusive of courses offered in the College of Agriculture and 
Forestry. 
Courses in the College of Agriculture and Forestry 24 

Physical Education 2 

Free Electives** 32 

Total 128 

°The pre-professional student may substitute advanced chemistry courses for calculus to 
meet degree requirements. This ordinarily means a minimum of 12 hours of chemistry in addition 
to the required courses. 

°°The student may elect to take courses in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies. 



AGRICULTURE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE 

Curriculum in Agriculture 

Students may pursue special programs with the close counsel of advisers who 
uc thoroughly familiar with the specialized areas which exist in the industry of agri- 
culture. The programs provide for the study of the basic and applied biological, 
physical, and social sciences relating to man's development and utilization of plants. 
animals, and land. Graduates will find career opportunities with the numerous in- 
dustries and agencies concerned with land use, food production, food processing, food 
distribution, and the man) services relating to these activities. 

The programs of Study within this curriculum for which there are appropriate 
advisers are as follows: 

Agricultural Education 

Students pursuing this program will meet requirements for certification by the 
West Virginia Department of Education. The program provides students with the 
opportunity to become qualified to teach in the broad field of vocational agriculture 
as well -is to become especially prepared to teach in agricultural production and 
management, animal processing, agricultural mechanics, agricultural sales and serv- 
ices, conservation, horticulture produce industry, or ornamental horticulture. Students 
in agricultural education have .in opportunity to stuck- extension education also in 
preparation for careers in extension activities. 

igricultu ral Mechanics 

Students in tin's specialized area have the opportunity to take courses in farm 
power and machinery, Farm structure, soil and water conservation, and electricity, as 
well .is courses in mechanical and civil engineering. Students can prepare themselves 

ha careers with electric power suppliers, machinery manufacturers and distributors, 
building materials industries, and Federal and slate agencies. 

Agronomy (Forage and (.rain Crops, Soil Science, and Soil Conservation) 
Students will emphasize courses in crop science, soil science, or both, depend- 
ing upon their interest in preparing themselves Foi positions involving various phases 

50 



of crop production and use. soil conservation, land management and classification, 
fertilizer use, weed control, farm management, turf and golf course maintenance. 
They may be employed by governmental agencies and private industry or be self- 
employed. 

Animal Science and Industry (Dairy, Livestock, and Poultry) 
Students electing this program will take courses in nutrition, pathology, breed- 
ing, and physiology to become prepared for career opportunities in the fields of 
animal, dairy, and poultry science. Courses in business law and management are 
recommended. Graduates of this program go into commercial farm management, or 
find positions in state or federal agricultural agencies or in advisory positions with 
banks, insurance companies, and other commercial firms. There are also courses avail- 
able in food science for those students who are interested in preparing for opportuni- 
ties in food processing related to dairy, poultry, and livestock products. 

Horticulture (Ornamentals, Fruits, Vegetables, and Soils) 

Students will study plant breeding, plant physiology, plant pathology, fertiliza- 
tion, and soils. Students may prepare for careers in commercial crop production, seed 
production, farm management, or careers with chemical firms, the fertilizer industry, 
or the nursery business. Positions as park and golf course superintendents are avail- 
able to graduates of this program and many will take positions with state and federal 
agencies. 

Curriculum Requirements 
For all students in the curriculum in Agriculture the program of courses taken 
in the freshman year is essentially the same. However, students are urged to select 
the appropriate adviser so that they may develop their program of study in one of 
the areas described above while meeting the requirements for the curriculum which 
are as follows: 

Requirements Hours 

English Composition and Rhetoric (or conformity with 

University English requirements) 6 

Arts and Humanities ( Group A) 12 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Group B) 12 

Natural Sciences (Group C included) 24 

( Must elect a minimum of 8 credits in biology; 8 credits in 

chemistry; 3 credits in college algebra or equivalent) 

Courses in Agriculture 45 

Elect a minimum of 3 credits in each of the following: 

1. Animal Science 

2. Plant Science 

3. Soil Science 

4. Agricultural Economics 

Elect additional courses selected from offerings in the Division of 
Agriculture to obtain the total of 45 credits in Agriculture. 

Physical Education 2 

Free Electives* 35 

Total 136 

"Students may elect to take courses in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies. 



AGRICULTURE 51 



Curriculum in Agribusiness 

This curriculum is designed to prepare students to manage or assume positions 
of professional management leadership in many businesses engaged in service and 
supply, production, processing and distribution of agricultural supplies, equipment, 
and products. The curriculum provides sufficient opportunities for the student who 
has already chosen a field of agriculture to specialize in training relevant to that 
field. At the same time it offers opportunity for broad training in the general area 
of agricultural business for the special field of agriculture. Alternatively, students 
who wish to become professional agricultural economists may prepare themselves by 
selecting certain elective courses in preparation for government employment or 
graduate training. 

Curriculum Requirements 

Requirements Hours 

English Composition and Rhetoric (or conformity with 

University English requirements) 6 

Arts and Humanities (Group A) 12 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (Group B included) 18 

(Must include 6 credits of Principles of Economics and at least 
3 credits in each: Psychology, Sociology, Political Science, and 
History) 

.Natural Sciences (Group C) 12 

(Must elect a minimum of 4 credits in chemistry, 4 credits in 
biological science, 3 credits in college algebra or equivalent) 

Courses in Agriculture 45 

Elect a minimum of 3 credits in each of the following: 

1. Animal Science 

2. Plant Science 

3. Soil Science 

Elect a minimum of 15 credits in Agricultural Economics. 
Elect additional courses selected from offerings in the Division 
of Agriculture to obtain the total of 45 credits in Agriculture. 

Courses in Commerce 15 

Physical Education 2 

Free Electives* 26 

Total 136 

°The student may elect to take courses in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

This curriculum prepares students For the career of a professional landscape 
architect. Training is provided in the technical skills of drawing, drafting, and crea- 
tion of topographical grading plans, construction details, planting plans, and estimates. 

Professional landscape architects arc qualified For positions in public and pri- 
vate employment, including civil service programs, in the many phases of site plan- 
ning and design, and lor collaboration with other planning professions in the develop- 
ment of land areas. 

52 







Landscape 


Architecture Curriculum 








First 


Year 




Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Hort.-L.A. 160 3 


IIort.-L.A. 161 


3 


L.A. 20 


4 


L.A. 21 


4 


L.A. 50 3 


L.A. 51 


3 


Art 11 


3 


Art 12 


3 


Math. 4 3 


Hort. 162 


3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


L.A. 12 


3 


C.E. 5 4 


Electives 


9 


Biological Sci. 




Math. 3 


3 


Electives 5 






elective 


4 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 








Elective 


3 


Elective 


1 









18 



18 



18 



18 



Summer 

Professional Experience (L.A. 62) 



Third Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

L.A. 131 3 L.A. 132 3 

L.A. 150 4 L.A. 151 4 

L.A. 241 3 L.A. 242 3 

Electives 8 L.A. 248 3 

Electives 5 



18 



Fourth Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

L.A. Electives 11 L.A. Electives 11 

Electives 7 Electives 7 



18 
Total- 144 Hours 



18 



18 



PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE PROGRAM 



This is a program designed to prepare students for entry into professional 
schools or colleges of veterinary medicine. West Virginia University has an arrange- 
ment with Oklahoma State University, through the Southern Regional Education 
Board, and with Ohio State University whereby each institution will accept up to 
four students annually into their Colleges of Veterinary Medicine. In order to qualify 
for these positions the students must have been West Virginia residents for at least 
the past five years. 

Applicants for admission to these Colleges of Veterinary Medicine must pre- 
sent at least 60 semester hours of acceptable credit. Hours earned in military science 
or aerospace studies or physical education or survey courses are not counted. Since 
only eight eligible students are accepted each year, alternate goals in degree pro- 
grams are urged for all pre-professional students. The equivalent of the following 
courses is required of all applicants for admission, without condition, to the Ohio 
or Oklahoma Colleges of Veterinary Medicine. 

Applicants with a grade-point average of 3.0 or above will be given first con- 
sideration for admission to these institutions. 



AGRICULTURE 



53 



Minimum Requirements Hours 

Agricultural Orientation 2 

English 6 

Chemistry 12 

Chemistry (Organic) 4 

Biology 8 

Mathematics 3 

Physics 8 

Humanities and Social Science 12 

Animal Industry and Veterinary Science** 10 

Total 65 

° Students applying to Oklahoma State University must include a three-credit course in 
American History. 

00 Animal Nutrition and Animal Genetics may be taken at Oklahoma State University during 
the second year in Veterinary Medicine. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ASSIGNED TOPICS 

In order to be eligible to register in Assigned Topics 180, the student must: 
(1) be in good standing, and (2) obtain approval of the appropriate Department 
Chairman prior to registration. 



AGRICULTURE 

11. Professions in Agriculture. I. 1 hr. Survey of the subject-matter disciplines 
and of the career opportunities available to agriculture graduates. Students 
study all the dimensions of the industry of agriculture. 

12. Professions in Agriculture. II. 1 hr. Continuation of Agr. 11. 

52. Principles of Plant Science. II. 4 hr. Basics of the nature, history, classifica- 
tion, role, distinction, structure and function, reproduction, improvement, 
culture, pests, storage and handling, production and marketing, and utilization 
of agricultural plants. 

ISO. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See above.) 

200. Agricultural Travel Course. S. 6 hr. Tour and study of production methods in 
major livestock and crop regions of the United States and other countries. In- 
fluence of population, climate, soil, topography, markets, labor, and other 

factors on agricultural production. 



AGRICULTURAL BIOCHEMISTRY 

101. Introductory Biochemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Two .semesters of General Chem. and 
one semester oi Organic Chem. The biochemistry of the proteins, carbohy- 
drates, lipids, aucleic acids, enzymes, coenzymes, and cellular metabolism in 
plants and animals. 

10 5 Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory. II. 1 hr. PR or cone: Agr. Biochem. 
101. Experiments complementary to the subject matter of Agr. Biochem. 101. 

54 



214. Radionuclide Biochemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Inorganic Chem., Organic Chem. or 
consent. Radionuclide chemistry, methods and isotope handling as needed by- 
students interested in life sciences. 

290. General Biochemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 134, qualitative analysis, and con- 
sent A general course in biochemistry primarily intended to meet the needs 
of graduate students. 

291. General Biochemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Agr. Biochem. 290 or consent. Continua- 
tion of Agr. Biochem. 290. 

292. Animal Biochemistry. I. 2 hr. PR or cone: Agr. Biochem. 291. Nutritional and 
physiological chemistry of domestic animals. 

293. Laboratory Experiments in Biochemistry. I. 2 hr. PR or cone: Agr. Biochem. 
290. Experiments to demonstrate certain phases of the subject matter covered 
in General Biochem. 

294. Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory. II. 2 hr. PR: Agr. Biochem. 293 and cone, 
reg. in Agr. Biochem. 291. Application of modern biochemical techniques to 
experimentation in animal and plant metabolism. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

104. Farm Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Principles in assembling, 
analyzing, and using farm business records; the use of budgeting in evaluating 
alternatives. 

110. Agribusiness Accounting. I. 4 hr. Accounting for business managers who do 
not intend to become accountants. A brief coverage of terminology and 
methodology; decisions in accounting as directed by executives; interpretations 
and values from accounts and accounting statements. Visits to business firms 
required. Offered in Fall of even years. 

131. Marketing Agricultural Products. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Market 
organization, market policies and practices and factors affecting the marketing 
of agricultural products. Tour of market agencies and facilities in Pittsburgh 
area required. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

200. Land Economics. II. 3 hr PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Classification, development, 
tenure, use, conservation, valuation and taxation, of rural, urban, mineral, 
forest, water and recreational land resources. Private and public rights in land 
and the affect of population on the demand for land. Offered in the Spring of 
odd years. 

206. Farm Planning. I. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing and Econ. 52 or equiv. Principal 
factors influencing returns on farms; planning use of labor, soil, crops, live- 
stock, buildings and equipment. Farm visits required. 

213. Economic Development. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52. A comprehensive study 
of the problems, changes and principal policy issues faced by non-industrial- 
ized countries in the process of economic development. This is a dual listing 
with Econ. 213. Students who elect this listing may not receive additional 
credit for Econ. 213. 

230. Cooperative Organization. II. 2-3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Organization, 
functions, and contributions of cooperatives in an economic system. Offered 
in Spring of even years. 

235. Marketing Dairy Products. II. 2 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Milk marketing 
policies and practices, including milk-market orders. Offered in the Spring of 
odd years. 

AGRICULTURE 55 



2\0. Agricultural Prices. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. An analysis of the price- 
malring forces which operate in the market places for the major agricultural 
commodities. Tour of market agencies and facilities in Pittsburgh area re- 
quired. 

255. Resource Analysis. I. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing and Econ. 52 or equiv. Con- 
struction of models consistent with economic reality for allocating the factors 
of production available on farms, in forests, and in non-farm agricultural 
businesses to produce profit maximizing plans through the use of linear and 
dynamic programming and electronic equipment. 

261. Agribusiness Finance. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. Credit needs for agri- 
cultural businesses, financing farm and market-agency firms, and organization 
and operation of credit agencies which finance agricultural business firms. 
Offered in Fall of odd years. 

271. Agricultural Policy. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 52 or equiv. An examination of the 
economic aspects of governmental price programs, production and marketing 
controls, subsidies, parity, export and import policies, and other programs 
affecting agriculture. Offered in Spring of even years. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

118. Group Organization and Leadership. II. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Principles and 
techniques involved in forming, structuring, developing, and directing organi- 
zations for effective professional leadership. 

Ed. 124. Student Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. I, II. 6 hr. 

Ed. 160. Materials for and Method of High School Teaching of Vocational Agri- 
culture. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Organization and preparation for teaching 
vocational agriculture in and through the high school. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. PR: Adequate ability and training 
for the work proposed and permission to register. (See page 54.) 

234. Principles of Cooperative Extension. I. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Background, phi- 
losophy, and history of cooperative extension. Activities of county cooperative 
extension agents and cooperative extension programs in West Virginia. 

238. Method and Materials in Extension Education. II. 2 hr. PR: Consent. Organi- 
zation and preparation for extension teaching and the processes of communi- 
cation. 

239. Program Building in Cooperative Extension. II. 3 hr. Organization in relation 
to program building. Leadership and group action. Overall working and edu- 
cational objectives, principles, methods and goals in developing county ex- 
tension programs. 

Ed. 276. Teaching Young, Adult Farmer, and Off -Farm Agricultural Occupations 

('lasses. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106, or consent. Participation in conducting 
young farmer, adult farmer, and off-farm agricultural occupations classes; 
organization, course of instruction, method in teaching, and supervision of the 
(lasses, young fanners' association, adult farmers' organization, off-farm agri- 
cultural occupations organization in classes. 

Ed. 277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Farming and Supervised Occupa- 
tional Experience Programs. II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 160 or consent. Planning pro- 
grams of supervised farming and supervised occupational experience, super- 
vising and evaluating such programs for day students, young fanner, adult 
farmer, and oil-farm agricultural occupations classes and groups. 

56 



AGRICULTURAL MECHANICS 

10. Principles of Agricultural Mechanics. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 4. Introduction to 
several fields of agricultural mechanics and how they are applied in agri- 
culture and industry. 3 hr. rec. 

152. Shop Theory and Methods. I. 3 hr. A course designed to familiarize students 
with: (1) up-to-date tools, materials, and shop methods; and (2) acceptable 
methods of developing basic skills with power and hand tools. 1 hr. rec, 
6 hr. lab. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

252. Advanced Farm Shop. II. 3 hr. PR: Agr. Mech. 152. Forging, cold-iron work, 
tool fitting, woodworking. Offers training for teaching shop work in rural 
high schools. 1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. 

253. Advanced Farm Machinery. II. 3 hr. Performance of agricultural equipment 
including calibration, efficiency, adjustments, and maintenance. Theoretical 
and practical aspects of selection based on economics, compatibility of 
machines with other equipment and the farming operation, service, and factors 
of custom operation. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

259. Farm Structures. II. 3 hr. Fundamentals of construction, functional require- 
ments, materials, new equipment, and use of laborsaving ideas and machinery. 
2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

270. Electricity in Agriculture. II. 3 hr. The fundamentals of electrical energy and 
its application to lighting, power, heating, and control circuits used in agricul- 
ture. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

275. Agricultural Engines. I. 3 hr. Relation of theory to design and operation of 
internal combustion engines with emphasis on care, operation, and mainte- 
nance. Study covers one, two, three, four, six, and eight cylinder engines, both 
in two and four stroke cycle designs. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 



AGRONOMY AND GENETICS 

Agronomy 

2. Principles of Soil Science. II. 4 hr PR: Inorganic Chem. An introduction to 
soil science. 3 lee, 1 lab. 

10. Forest Soils. II. 3 hr. Principles of soil science with particular reference to 
forest soils. 2 lee, 1 lab. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

210. Soil Fertility. I. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. Soil properties in relation to fertility 
and productivity of soils; evaluation of soil fertility; production of fertilizers 
and their use in increasing the fertility and productivity of soils. 

212. Soil Conservation and Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 210. Principles of 
soil and water conservation in relation to soil erosion control. Using soil tech- 
nology to solve soil management problems relating to cropping systems. 
Offered in Spring of odd years. 

216. Soil Genesis and Classification. I. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. The classification 
and mapping of soils. Theory and practice in soil classification, soil mapping, 
and land judging. Offered in Fall of even years. 

230. Soil Physics. II. 3 hr. PR: Agron. 2 or 10. Physical properties of soils, water 
and air relationships and their influence on soil productivity. Offered in Spring 
of even years. 

AGRICULTURE 57 



250. Turfgrass Management. I. 3 lir. PR: Agron. 2, or consent. The establishment, 
maintenance, and adaptation of .masses and Legumes for lawns, golf courses, 

parks, athletic fields, and roadsides. An understanding of turfgrass manage- 
ment will be developed 1>> associating differential plant responses with soil, 
climatic, and biotic lac tors that influence plant species growth, selection, and 
adaptation. Offered in Fall of even years. 

251. Weed Control. I. 3 hr. PR: Agr. 52, Agron. 2, or consent. Fundamental prin- 
ciples of weed control. Recommended control measures for and identification 
of common weeds. Offered in Fall of odd years. 

252. Grain and Special Crops. I. 3 hr. PR: Agr. 52, Agron. 2, or consent. Advanced 
study of methods in the production of grain and special crops. Varieties, im- 
provement, tillage, harvesting, storage and uses of crops grown for seed or 
special purposes. Offered in Fall of even years. 

254. Pasture and Forage Crops. II. 4 hr. PR: Agr. 52, Agron. 2, or consent. All 
phases of pasture and forage crop production, including identification, seed- 
ing, management, use, seed production, and storage of forage crops. 

Genetics 

171. Principles of Genetics. II. 3 hr. PR: 8 hr. of biological science. The funda- 
mentals of inheritance. Must be accompanied by Gen. 172. 

172. Genetics Laboratory. II. 1 hr. PR: Gen. 221 or registration in Gen. 171. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II. 1-4 hr. per sem. PR: Gen. 171 or 221 and consent. (See 
page 54.) 

220. Crop Rreeding. II. 3 hr. PR: Gen. 171 or 221. Methods and basic scientific 
principles involved in the improvement of leading cereal and forage crops 
through hybridization and .selections. Offered in Spring of odd years. 

221. Basic Concepts of Modern Genetics. I. 3 hr. PR: 8 hr. of biological science 
and 1 year of chemistry. Independent inheritance, linkage. Chemical nature of 
genetic material. Control of phenotype by genetic material. Gene action and 
coding of genetic material. 

224. Human Genetics. I. 3 hr. PR: Gen. 171 and 221 or consent. A study of the 
genetic system responsible for the development of phenotype in man. Offered 
in Fall of even years. 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Animal Industry and Veterinary Science 

51. Principles of Animal Science. I. 4 hr. A comparative study of the production 
of meat, milk, eggs, and wool, Nutrition, physiology, genetics, hygiene, physi- 
cal environment, and economies are discussed as bases lor sound managerial 
decisions. 

L80. Assigned Topics. I. II, S. 1 1 hr. per sem. 'Sec page 54.) 

L95. Seminar. II. 1 hr. Senior seminar. 

Animal Breeding and Genetics 

220. Breeding of Farm Animals. I. 3 hr. PR: 3 In. in Genetics or consent. The 
application oi principles ol quantitative population genetics to the improve- 
ment of lai in animals. 



r,s 



Animal Nutrition 

101. Animal Nutrition. I. 3 hr. PR: Two courses in chemistry. Digestion and me- 
tabolism of food nutrients, nutrient requirements of farm animals, and nutritive 
values of feeds and rations. 

294. Poultry Nutrition. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). Nutritional requirements, nutrient inter- 
relationships, and nutritional deficiencies of all types of domesticated fowl. 

295. Principles of Nutrition and Metabolism. I. 3 hr. PR: Agr. Biochem. 102. A 

basic course in animal nutrition. 



Animal Physiology 

100. Introduction to the Physiology of Domestic Animals. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 1 or 
consent. The function and regulation of the principal systems of the animal 
body. 

204. Animal Physiology Laboratory. I. 2 hr. PR: An. Physiol. 100 or concurrent 
registration. 

225. Physiology of Reproduction. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or consent. Comparative 
physiology of reproduction in higher animals, endocrine functions involved in 
reproduction, genetic and environmental variations in fertility mechanisms. 

227. Milk Secretion. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: Organic Chem.; Physiol. The evolution, 
anatomy, and growth of the mammary gland. The chemical hormonal, physio- 
logical, and environmental factors affecting lactation. Offered in odd years. 

280. Behavioral Patterns of Domestic Animals. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). Examination of 
the bases for and exhibition and control of behavioral patterns of domestic 
animals. 

NOTE: Students also are referred to Psych. 201, Physiological Psychology; Zool. 271, 
Human Physiology; Zool. 273, 274, Cellular Physiology; and Zool. 276, Com- 
parative Physiology. 

Animal Production 

108. Animal Production Experience. I, II, S. 1 hr. (3 hr. lab.). A maximum of 4 
credit hours may be earned by enrolling in this course. Experience in operat- 
ing a poultry, dairy, or livestock farm, including trapnesting, incubation, and 
pedigreeing poultry; feeding, handling, calving, lambing, or farrowing of dairy 
and beef cows, sheep, and hogs. 

122. Milk Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). Feeding and management of dairy cattle. 

°123. Dairy Cattle History and Selection. II. 3 hr. (2 labs.). To familiarize the 
student with the history, development and programs of the breeds of dairy 
cattle as well as the modern concepts in phenotype and performance record 
evaluation. 

°138. Grading and Selection of Meat and Meat Animals. II. 3 hr. (2 labs.). Appraisal 
of live meat animals, carcasses and cuts; and the evaluation of scientific tech- 
niques used in selecting meat animals and evaluating carcass meat. 

"141. Beef Production. I. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: An. Nutr. 101. Physiological and eco- 
nomical bases of beef production. 

•142. Pork Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: An. Nutr. 101. Physiological and 
economical bases of pork production. Offered in Spring of even years. 



"Transportation for required trips in connection with these courses will generally be sup- 
plied by the College. Students will be responsible for their meals and lodging. 

AGRICULTURE 59 



143. Selection. Evaluation, and Grading of Meat Animals, Carcasses and Cuts. I. 
2 or 4 lir. PR: An. Prod. 138 and consent. Evaluation of breeding merit and 
potential (..mass characteristics of red meat animals; evaluation of meat quality 
ami other factors affecting the marketability of meat. Tours of representative 
flocks, herds, and packing plants will be required. 

144. Light Horse Science. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). The application of breeding, nutrition. 
physiology, and pathology to production and management of light horses. 

L62. Sheep Production. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: An. Xutr. 101. Physiological and 
economical bases of sheep production. Offered in odd years. 

201. Advanced Poultry Production. I. 3 hr. Special phases of broiler and egg pro- 
duction, disease control, laborsaving studies, and recent designs in building 
and heating equipment for all types of poultry. Offered in odd years. 

223. Advanced Livestock Production. 3 hr. PR: Animal Nutrition 101 and consent. 
Evaluation of current research— Animal Breeding, Nutrition and Physiology 
and its application to production and management of beef cattle, sheep, swine, 
and dairy cattle. 

224. Current Literature in Animal Science. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: An. Xutr. 101. 
Evaluation of current research in animal science and its application to pro- 
duction and management. 



Food Science 

12. Dairy Technology. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). Introductory. Composition and properties 
of milk and milk products; butterfat testing; manufacture of dairy products. 
Offered in Spring of odd years. 

106. Poultry Products Technology. I. 2 hr. (1 lab.). To familiarize the student with 
poultry and egg grades, and factors and conditions that determine and influ- 
ence the quality of poultry products. Offered in even years. 

107. Milk and Public Health. I. 3 hr. (1 lab.). Food value of milk and its produc- 
tion and processing in relation to public health. Offered in odd years. 

124. Judging Dairy Products. II. 2 hr. (2 labs.). A laboratory course in evaluating 
and judging dairy products. 

130. Market Milk Products and Frozen Desserts. I. 4 hr. (1 lab.). The assembling, 
processing, packaging, storing and merchandising of dairy products. Offered 
in Fall of even years. 

167. Meats. I. 3 hr. (2 labs.). Processing, curing, and care of meats. Visit to one 
of the large packing houses of Pittsburgh required. 

202. Advanced Meats. II. 3 hr. (2 labs.). PR: Food Sci. 167. Studies covering com- 
position of meat, complete fabrication of meat animal carcasses, factors in- 
fluencing yield, physiology and chemistry of pertinent phenomena, and mer- 
chandising of meat. Offered in Spring of even years. 



Veterinary Science 

102. Animal Pathology. I. 3 hr. Diseases of domestic animals, with special emphasis 
on the COmmOI] diseases. 

206. Parasites and Pathology. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Common parasites of 
farm animals, their control, and their effect upon the host. Offered in Spring 
of odd years. 

Jin. Principles of Laboratory Animal Science. II. 3 hr. (1 lab.). PR: Consent for 
undergraduates. The management, genetics, physiology, nutrition, diseases and 
germ free methods oi the common laboratory animals. 



eo 



HORTICULTURE 

Horticulture 

107. General Horticulture. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 1, Agr. 52, or consent. Principles 
underlying present day horticultural practice with special emphasis on how 
basic discoveries in plant science have been applied in horticulture. 

115. Judging and Identification of Apple Varieties. I. 1 hr. Two laboratory periods 

half of semester. Identification and judging of apple varieties. 

116. Flower Judging. II. 1 hr. One laboratory period per week. Identification and 
judging of flowers with emphasis on the aesthetic values which underlie de- 
sirability in a variety. 

117. Vegetable Identification and Judging. I. 1 hr. Identification and judging the 
common vegetables and the tests associated with olericulture in West Virginia. 
Emphasis is placed in the cultural practices associated with top quality vege- 
tables. 

141. Greenhouse Management. II. 3 hr. The greenhouse as a controlled plant en- 
vironment. A study of how to manipulate factors influencing plant growth and 
development within the specialized environments of greenhouses. 

151. Floral Design. II. 3 hr. PR: Hort. 141 or consent. A basic course in flower 
arrangement to cover all occasions for the home and retail flower shop. 

160. Woody Plant Materials. I. 3 hr. Identification, ecology, and evaluation of trees, 
shrubs, vines and groundcovers for landscape plantings. 

161. Woody Plant Materials. II. 3 hr. PR: Hort. 160 or consent. Identification, 
ecology and evaluation of trees, shrubs, vines and groundcovers for landscape 
plantings. 

162. Plant Materials. I. 3 hr. PR: Hort. 161 or consent. Identification, description, 
adaptability and evaluation of the principal kinds and varieties of annual and 
herbaceous perennials with emphasis on their use as design elements. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

204. Plant Propagation. II. 3 hr. A study of the practices of plant propagation and 
the factors involved in reproduction in plants. 

229. Landscape Design. I. 3 hr. (1 lee, 1 scheduled lab., 1 arranged lab.). A course 
in ornamental horticulture giving an appreciation of the basic principles of 
design and information pertaining to the use and care of ornamental plants 
around the home. 

242. Small-Fruits. I. 3 hr. (2 lee, 1 scheduled lab.). PR: Agr. 52, Hort. 107, or 
consent. The taxonomic, physiological and ecological principles involved in 
the production and handling of small-fruits. 

243. Physiology of Vegetables. I. 3 hr. (2 lee, 1 scheduled lab.). PR: Agr. 52. 
Physiological and ecological principles involved in the production of vegetable 
crops. 

244. Handling and Storage of Horticultural Crops. II. 3 hr. (2 lee, 1 scheduled 
lab.). PR: Agr. 52, Chcm. 16. Characteristics of perishable crops. Methods and 
materials employed to maintain quality. 



Entomology 

152. Forest Entomology. II. 3 hr. PR: Forestry 112. Relationships between insects 
and the forest; recognition and control of important species. This course is 
primarily designed for forestry students. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

AGRICULTURE 61 



202. Agricultural Entomology. II. 4 In. PR: Biol. 1, 2. The basic aspects of insect 
life, emphasizing the study of economically important insects and their con- 
trol. Designed to meet the needs of students in agriculture. Does not carry 
graduate credit for majors in Entomology. 

Landscape Architecture 

12. History of Landscape Architecture. II. 3 hr. Landscape design from early 
times in Asia, Europe, and the American scene. 

20. Architectural Design. I. 4 hr. Introduction to the architectural elements in- 
voking the expression of a variety of materials in two- and three-dimensional 
design. 

21. Architectural Design. II. 4 hr. Continuation of L.A. 20 with a study of more 
complicated problems to further develop analytical and creative ability. 

50. Theory of Landscape Architectural Design. I. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 21. Introduction 
to basic theory and landscape design principles. 

51. Landscape Architectural Design. II. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 50. Problems in basic 
landscape design to acquaint the student with the various materials and to 
develop his capacity to design in the outdoor space. 

02. Professional Experience. S. No credit. Experience in a landscape architectural 
position with a private or public organization is invaluable to the training of 
a student. Completion of a minimum of three months' experience is required 
prior to graduation. Evidence of work completed will be handled at the dis- 
cretion of the Department of Horticulture. 

131. Landscape Architectural Construction. I. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 51. Landscape struc- 
tures, their use in design including selection and use of materials. 

132. Landscape Construction. II. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 131. Preparation of grading and 
drainage plans including specifications and cost estimates. 

150. Landscape Architectural Design. I. 4 hr. PR: L.A. 51. Design problems in- 
volving private, public, and semi-public areas with emphasis on plan analysis, 
detail, and presentation. Problems are integrated with construction and plant 
materials. 

151. Landscape Architectural Design. II. 4 hr. Continuation of L.A. 150. 
180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

241. Planting Design. I. 3 hr. PR: Hort. 161, Hort. 162, or consent and L.A. 51. 
Laboratory design problems in the use of plant materials with emphasis on 
plants as objects of the design and their association and arrangement for land- 
scape effect. 

242. Planting Design. II. 2 hr. Continuation of L.A. 241. 

248. Design Analysis. II. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 150, 241. Analysis of executed problems 
through discussions involving basic theory, readings, and reports. 

250. Landscape Architectural Design. I. 5 hr. PR: L.A. 151, 242. Advanced design 
problems; a continuation of L.A. 150 and 151 with emphasis on site function 
and detail. 

251. Landscape Architectural Design. II. 5 hr. Continuation of L.A. 250. 

265. Regional Design. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Survey of regional landscapes to gain 
an understanding of the relationships of the casual factors requisite to con- 
ceptualization of the visual-physical form of the regional environment. 

270. Recreation Planning. 1. 3 hr. PR: L.A. 151. Design of park and recreation 
areas involving park history, classification theory, and administration. 

278. Site Planning Projects. I. 4 hr. PR: L.A. 250. Preparation of site plans and 
master programs, housing subdivisions, and institutional areas. Professional 

practice and ethics are integrated with the master program. 
62 



284. Professional Practice. II. 2 hr. The profession of landscape architecture in- 
volving the procedures in the preparation of contract documents, fees, esti- 
mates, operation of an office, and the relationship to clients and contractors. 



PLANT PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Plant Pathology 

153. Forest Pathology. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2, For. 112. Important diseases of forest 
and shade trees. Causes and methods of control. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

201. General Plant Pathology. I. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141. Nature and cause of plant 
diseases; methods of control. 

202. Principles of Plant Pathology. II. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141 and either Plant Path. 
153, 201, or 203, or consent. Primarily for graduate students and seniors 
majoring in botany, biology, or agricultural science. Nature of diseases in 
plants with practice in laboratory methods. Offered in Spring of even years. 

203. Mycology. I. 4 hr. Lectures and field and laboratory studies of parasitic and 
saprophytic fungi. 

209. Nematology. I. 3 hr. PR: Plant Path. 201 or consent. Primarily for graduate 
students majoring in the agricultural sciences, zoology or botany. Nematode 
taxonomy, bionomics, and control, with particular emphasis on plant parasitic 
forms. Offered in Spring of odd years. 

Bacteriology 

141. General Bacteriology. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Inorganic Chem. Introductory morpho- 
logical, cultural, and physiological characteristics of bacteria; application of 
bacteriology to agriculture, home economics, sanitation, and health. 

180. Assigned Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. (See page 54.) 

247 Food Microbiology. I. 4 hr. PR: Bact. 141, Organic Chem. or consent. The 
ecology and physiology of microorganisms important in the manufacture and 
deterioration of foods and the techniques for the microbiology examination 
of foods. Offered in Fall of even years. 

248. Sanitary Bacteriology. I. 3 hr. PR: Bact. 141. Standard bacteriological methods 
used in routine examination of water and sewage. Offered in Fall of odd years. 



AGRICULTURE 63 



DIVISION OF FORESTRY 



FACULTY 

David 1-. While Ph.D., Director. Division of Forestry; Associate Professor of Forest 

Economics. 
George H. Breiding, B.S., State Extension Program Lender— Outdoor Recreation; 

Assistant Professor of Forestry. 
Samuel M. Brock, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forest Economics. 
Maurice G. Brooks, M.S., D.Sc, Professor of Wildlife Management. 
James H. Brown, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Silviculture and Associate Silviculturist. 
Kenneth L. Carvell, D.For., Professor of Silviculture and Silviculturist; Director of 

University Forests. 
Franklin C. Ccch, Ph.D., Professor of Forest Genetics and Forest Geneticist. 
John D. Gill, M.S., Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management. (Wildlife Biologist, 

U.S. Forest Service Forestry Sciences Laboratory.) 
Allen W. Goodspeed, M.F., Professor of Forest Management and Forester. 
William H. Goudy, M.S., Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management. (Supervisor oi 

Game Research, West Virginia Department of Natural Resources). 
William N. Grafton, M.S.F., Assistant Professor and Area Extension Specialist- 
Forestry. 
Carter S. Hall, M.B.A., State Extension Specialist— Forest Industries and Assistant 

Professor. 
John R. Hamilton, Ph.D., Professor of Wood Science and Wood Scientist. 
William M. Healy, B.S., Instructor in Wildlife Management. (Wildlife Biologist, U.S. 

Forest Service Forestry Sciences Laboratory). 
Joseph M. Hutchison, Jr., M.S., Assistant Professor of Recreation. 
Norman D. Jackson, M.W.T., Assistant to the Director; Assistant Professor of Wood 

Science and Assistant Wood Scientist. 
Etley P. Jenkins, B.S.F., Instructor in Wood Science. 

Laszlo O. Keresztesy, Ph.D., Research Associate in Wood Science and Associate Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering. 
William E. Kidd, Jr., M.S., Assistant Professor and State Extension Specialist— Forest 

Management. 
Christian B. Koch, Ph.D., Professor of Wood Science and Wood Scientist. 
Don L. Kulow, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forest Mensuration and Associate Forest 

Mensurationist. 
Richard Lee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Forest Hydrology and Associate Forest 

Hydrologist. 
William H. Maxey, B.S.F., Instructor and Forest Manager. 
Peter R. Mount, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of lorest Economics and Assistant Forest 

Economist. 
James II. Patrick, M.F., Assistant Professor of Forest Hydrology. (Project Leader, 

Watershed Research, U.S. Forest Service, Parsons Timber and Watershed 

I .aboratory). 
W. Clemenl Percival, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus. 
James W. Haw son, B.S.F., Instructor in Wildlife Management. (Game Biologist, West 

Virginia Departmenl oi Natural Resources). 

II. Weed Sanderson, M.S., Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management. (Wildlife 
Biologist, U.S. Forest Service Forestry Sciences Laboratory). 

64 



John G. Scherlacher, M.Ed., Professor of Recreation. 

Robert L. Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Wildlife Management and Associate 
Wildlife Biologist. 

Hans-Peter Steinhagen, B.F.A.. Assistant Professor of Wood Science and Assistant 
Wood Scientist. 

Jack W. Thomas, B.S., Assistant Professor of Wildlife Management. (Wildlife Biolo- 
gist, U.S. Forest Service Forestry Sciences Laboratory). 

George R. Trimble, Jr., B.S.F., Assistant Professor of Forest Management. (Project 
Leader, Timber Management Research, U.S. Forest Service, Parsons Timber 
and Watershed Laboratory). 

Earl II. Tryon, Ph.D., Professor of Silviculture and Silviculturist. 

William L. Wylie, B.S., Instructor in Forest Recreation. 

Joseph N. Yeager, B.S., Instructor in Forestry and Area Extension Specialist— Forestry. 



WHY A CAREER IN FORESTRY? 

A career in forestry provides personal satisfaction from feeling that your work 
is important to society, and an opportunity to utilize your education in an out-of-doors 
environment. Forestry is the oldest professional field in this country whose primary 
concern is the conservation of natural resources. There are now more than 20,000 pro- 
fessional foresters in the United States. The need for intelligent management of 
forests for wood crops, water, wildlife, and recreation will increase as population 
grows. 

The professional forester must combine a scientific knowledge with ability to 
manage both people and financial affairs. His decisions often affect the lives of 
thousands of people and they may determine the success or failure of a multi-million 
dollar enterprise. 

A graduate forester entering federal employment can expect a starting salary 
of from $5,565 to $6,734 per year. Salaries in state employment are generally some- 
what below those of similar federal positions. Salaries in private industry are usually 
somewhat higher. Foresters hold key executive positions in government and industry 
where salary is commensurate with responsibility. 



FORESTRY AT WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 

West Virginia University is one of thirty-two schools in the United States 
whose forestry programs are accredited by the Society of American Foresters. The 
WVU forestry faculty is composed of a group of outstanding men representing all 
disciplines basic to forestry— men who have chosen teaching and research as their 
life's work and who are dedicated teachers. 

The student body numbers over 400 and is one of the most congenial, yet 
spirited, groups on the campus. Forestry students are usually very active in social 
events, athletic competition, and service programs. This is true in spite of the fact 
that foresters' class schedules are more crowded than most. A typical day in the life 
of a forestry student might include breakfast in the dorm with his roommate, three or 
four morning classes, back to the dorm for lunch, change into field clothes for a 
trip to the University Forest, a hurried dinner so that a couple of hours are available 
for studying before the basketball game (or some other function), and one last crack 
at the books before bedtime. 

The WVU forestry student is provided with the best of facilities. The Forestry- 
Building, completed in 1965 at a cost of $2.5 million, contains specially designed 
classrooms, laboratories, faculty and graduate student offices, a reading room, a stu- 
dent lounge, and student locker rooms. The forestry reading room has been de- 
veloped primarily for the use of the undergraduate student; it contains more than 
20,000 cataloged books and bulletins. 

FORESTRY 65 



The West Virginia University Forest is a 7,500-acre tract only ten miles from 
the campus. It is used for teaching, rest arch, and demonstration purposes. It also is 
the site <>l various studenl activities, such as field days, where students compete in 
old-time woodsmens' activities. 

Through its seven curriculum options (Forest Resources Management, Wild- 
lilt and Fishery Management, Wood Industries, Wood Science, Forest Science, 
Recreation Resources Management, and Recreation) the Division of Forestry prepares 
young men and women for a wide and interesting array of challenging careers. 

Forest Resources Management 

With the growing demand for forest products and the increasing public con- 
sciousness of the value of forests for recreation and watershed protection, career 
opportunities for professionals trained in the scientific management of timber re- 
sources are expanding rapidly. Graduates who have majored in Forest Resources 
Management have a wide range of prospective employers, including federal and 
state agencies and private industry. 

Wildlife and Fishery Management. 

So you like to hunt and fish! Most young men do, but perhaps your are one 
who would like to know more about game and fish— how these creatures live, what 
they eat, and how their numbers may be increased. If so, you might consider a career 
in Wildlife and Fishery Management. 

Wood Industries 

Challenge and fulfillment permit no dull moments for well-trained adminis- 
trative and scientific personnel in the wood products field. Graduates with training 
in wood products are sought by manufacturers of lumber, veneer, plywood, pulp, and 
paper, and particle board; and by companies using these materials for further manu- 
facture of such things as flooring, furniture, millwork, boats, containers, and textiles. 
Other opportunities are with large wood-using industries (railroads, public utilities, 
and construction firms). If you are interested in sales work, forest industries have a 
special need for you. They demand men who can sell new wood products which are 
constantly being developed. Industries place no limitation on income, and they offer 
opportunity for rapid advancement, enjoyable work, and freedom of choice of lo- 
cation. 

Recreation Resources Management 

Population growth, together with a higher standard of living which allows for 
more leisure time, has resulted in greatly increased demand for outdoor recreation. 
In order to help meet this demand, resource managers are needed who are familiar 
with recreation problems and who have a good understanding of the natural sciences. 
The principal employing agencies are the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, National 
Park Service, U. S. Forest Service, state and local recreation departments, and private 
recreation enterprises. 

Forest Science and Wood Science 

The curriculum options in forest science and wood science are intended to 
prepare students lor graduate work in the more highly technical phases of wood use 
or forest production. These options are especially suitable 1 for students wlio anticipate 
careers in research or teaching. 

Recreation 

The curriculum in recreation is designed to prepare students for professional 
mi icaiion responsibilities in parks and recreation systems, governmental agencies, pri- 
vate industry, schools, churches, public housing, hospitals, and similar agencies serv- 
ing a societj which lias become increasingly aware of appropriate use of leisure time. 

06 



As our society continues to use its scientific knowledge in efficient develop- 
ment of its natural and man made resources, it will continue to make leisure time 
and recreation important social concerns. Are you interested in working with people? 
Do you feel that man, natural resources and urban culture are closely related? Is it 
your wish to serve modern society through a career devoted to the leisure aspect of 
people's lives? If so, consider the challenge of a relatively new field of service which 
has a variety of job opportunities and directions. 



SUMMER FIELD PRACTICE 

The six-week Forest Resources Management Summer Field Practice consists of 
two consecutive three-week sessions, and is designed for students who have com- 
pleted the junior year of the forest resources management or wildlife and fish man- 
agment curriculum options. Students live in Morgantown in University- or privately- 
owned housing, and travel to the nearby University Forest daily for field studies. The 
instructional program provides training in forest surveying, timber estimating, photo 
interpretation, forest management, and forest recreation. Occasional trips are made 
to wood-using industries, and to other forests to study the management of northern 
hardwood and spruce types. The Summer Field Practice culminates in a one-week 
trip to North Carolina where silvicultural and management activities are observed in 
the Southern Pine Region. 

The five-week Wood Industry Field Practice is designed for students who have 
completed the junior year of the wood industry curriculum. The instructional pro- 
gram consists of a three-week field course in surveying and mensuration. The follow- 
ing two-week period is spent on a trip to the Southeast to observe various commer- 
cial wood-using industries. These industries include lumber, plywood, veneer, particle 
board, hardboard, furniture, glue lamination, and preservation. 

The Wildlife Summer Field Trip is a two-week field trip for students who 
have completed the junior year of the wildlife and fish management curriculum. The 
field trip is designed to acquaint students with major wildlife habitats outside of the 
Central Appalachians and with selected major wildlife refuges, shooting preserves, 
and other intensively managed areas. A summer of approved work experience in the 
wildlife field may be substituted for the requirements. 

For resident students the tuition is $9.00 per credit hour; for nonresidents the 
tuition is $33.00 per credit hour. A laboratory fee is charged to all students. These 
must be paid to the University Comptroller at the time of registration. Other ex- 
penses include lodging and meals on the southern trip. 



CURRICULA 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S.F. DEGREE 
IN FOREST RESOURCES MAxNAGEMENT 

NOTE: Credit for English and Mathematics 2 will not be counted towards the 
B.S.F. Degree. 





First 


Year 






Seconc 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Bot. 67 


2 


Bot. 68 


1 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


C.E. 5 


4 


C.E. 6 


2 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Econ. 51 


3 


For. 11 


3 


Math. 3 


3 


Math. 4 


3 


Agron. 10 


3 


Bot. 171 


3 


For. 1 


1 


For. 4 





Elective 


3 


Physics 1 


4 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 










For. 3 



















16 




15 




15 




16 












FORESTRY 


67 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


For. 130 


3 


For. 21 


3 


For. 141 


3 


For. 220 


3 


For. 212 


4 


For. 136 


3 


For. 223 


4 


For. 226 


2 


For. 251 


2 


For. 204 


3 


Bot. 61 


2 


Electives 


12 


PI Path. 153 


3 


For. 224 


2 


Electives 


9 






Electives 


6 


Electives (Oral 
written com- 
munication ) 

Elective 


or 

3 
3 











18 



17 



18 



17 



Summer Field Practice 

(To be taken after Third Year) 

For. 106 3 

For. 107 3 



6 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S.F. DEGREE 
FOR WOOD INDUSTRIES 

NOTE: Credit for English and Mathematics 2 will not be counted towards the 
B.S.F. Degree. 





First Year 






Seconc 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Chem. 12 


4 


For. 131 


3 


For. 11 


3 


Chem. 11 


4 


English 2 


3 


Bot. 67 


2 


For. 21 


3 


English 1 


3 


Math. 4 


3 


Econ. 51 


3 


Bot. 68 


1 


Math. 3 


3 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


C.E. 1 


2 


Econ. 52 


3 


For. 1 


1 


For. 4 





Physics 1 


4 


Physics 2 


4 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Electives 


6 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


For. 3 


















16 



17 



17 



17 



During the final two years, the student will have the option of emphasizing 
either: (1) wood industry production, or (2) wood industry management. The require- 
ments for the management option, indicated below by (°), include the courses pre- 
requisite to advanced study in the College of Commerce. 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


For. 132 


3 


For. 134 


3 


For. 223 


4 


For. 220 


3 


For. 212 


4 


For. 135 


2 


For. 239 


3 


For. 230 


3 


I.E. 140 or 




For. 204 


3 


For. 229 or 




For. 238 


3 


Acctg. 51° 


3 


For. 235 


3 


Elective* 


3 


Mkt. 111° 


3 


Electives 


6 


Acctg. 52° or 




Fin. Ill 


3 


Electives 


5 






Elective 


3 


Mgmt. Ill* 


or 










Elective 


3 


I.E. 142 


3 







16 



17 



16 



17 



°ioi students who plan graduate work in Business Administration. 



68 



Summer Field Practice 

(To be taken after Third Year) 

For. 106 3 

For. 109 2 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S. DEGREE 
IN WILDIFE AND FISHERY MANAGEMENT 

NOTE: Credit for English and Mathematics 2 will not be counted towards the B.S. 
Degree. 





First Year 






Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Bot. 67 


2 


For. 11 


3 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Chem. 31 


3 


Bot. 68 


1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Physics 1 


4 


Econ. 52 


3 


Math. 3 


3 


Math. 4 


3 


Econ. 51 


3 


Geog. 8 


3 


For. 1 


1 


For. 4 





C.E. 1 


2 


Physics 2 


4 


For. 3 





Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Agron. 10 


3 


Elective 


3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 
















16 




15 




IT 




17 




Third 


Year 






Fourth 


i Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


For. 212 


4 


For. 226 


2 


For. 241 


3 


For. 146 


2 


For. 243 


3 


For. 244 


3 


An. Phys. 100 


3 


For. 245 


3 


Zool. 251 or 




Bot. 161 


3 


Biol. 161 


3 


Pol. Sci. 101 


3 


Zool. 255 


4 


Gen. 171 


3 


Sociol. 1 or 




Botany elective 


3 


Electives 


6 


Electives 


6 


Psych. 1 
Electives 


3 

6 


Electives 


6 




17 




17 




18 




17 








Summer 












(To be taken after Third Year] 


1 










For. 147 . . 






2 







SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S. DEGREE 
IN RECREATION RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 

NOTE: Credit for English and Mathematics 2 will not be counted toward the B.S. 
Degree. 





First 


Year 








Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Bot. 


67 


2 


For. 11 


3 


Geol. 1 


3 


Geol. 3 


1 


C.E. 


5 


4 


Bot. 68 


1 


Geol. 2 


1 


Geol. 4 


1 


Econ. 51 


3 


Econ. 52 


3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Spec 


•ch 11 


3 


C.E. 6 


2 


Math. 3 


3 


Math. 4 


3 


Core Group 


A 6 


Acctg. 51 


3 


For. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 








Rec. 104 


3 


Phvs. Ed. 1 


1 


For. 4 











Core Group A 


3 


For. 3 



16 


Core Group A 


3 

18 






18 




18 














FORESTRY 


69 



First Sem. 

For. 140 
For. 212 
For. 251 
Ag. Econ. 200 
Finance 111 
Elective 



Third Year 
Hr. Second Sem. Hr. First Son. 



Fourth Year 



Rec. 202 
Journ. 212 
Sociol. 1 
Electives 



For. 141 
For. 142 
For. 226 
Rec. 282 
L.A. 276 
Elective 



Hr. 

3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 



Second Sem. 
For. 220 
For. 147 
Journ. 230 
Mgmt. 105 
Elective 



Hr. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



18 



15 



For. 152 

(To be taken 



after Third Year) 



17 



15 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S. DEGREE 
IN FOREST SCIENCE 

NOTE: Credit for English 0, Mathematics 2, 3, and 4 will not be counted towards 
the B.S. Degree. 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Bot. 67 


2 


For. 11 


3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


C.E. 1 


2 


Bot. 68 


1 


Math. 15 


4 


Math. 16 


4 


Econ. 51 


3 


Bot. 171 


3 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Agron. 10 


3 


Physics 11 


4 


For. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Electives* 


6 


Electives* 


6 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


For. 4 













For. 3 



















17 




16 




16 




17 




Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


For. 212 


4 


For. 21 


3 


For. 131 


3 


Stat. 212 


3 


Chem. 133 


3 


For. 204 


3 


For. 141 


3 


Electives* 


15 


Chem. 135 


1 


Electives* 


12 


Statistics 211 


3 






Physics 102 


4 






Electives* 


9 






Electives* 


4 















16 



IS 



IS 



18 



°A1I elective hours arc to he determined in consultation with faculty adviser. 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR B.S.W.S. DEGREE 






IN 


WOOD 


SCIENCE 






NOTE: Credit for E 


Inglish 0, Mathematics 


2, 3, and 4 


will not 


be counted towards 


the 


B.S.W.S. 


Degree. 












First Year 






Second Year 


First Son. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First S< m. 


JJr. 


Sceond Sem. Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Chem. 15 


4 


For. 131 


3 


Bot. 68 1 


English 1 


3 


English - 


3 


Bot. 67 


2 


Hot. 171 3 


Math. L5 


4 


\latli. Hi 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 102 4 


For. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Math. 17 


4 


1 A.M. 101 3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Elective 


3 


Physics 11 


4 


Elective 3 


Elective 


3 


For. 4 











For. 3 


o 













16 



15 



17 



14 



70 





Third 


Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. Second Sem. 


Hr. 


For. 232 


3 


For. 204 


3 


For. 239 


3 For. 230 


3 


Chem. 133 


3 


For. 135 


2 


Elective 


3 For. 235 


3 


Chem. 135 


1 


For. 11 


3 


Electives 


12 Electives 


11 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


Electives 


9 








Econ. 51 
Electives 


3 
3 













16 



17 



18 



17 



Approved Summer Work Experience 

(To be taken after Third Year) 



SCHEDULE OF REQUIRED CURRICULUM FOR DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RECREATION 

NOTE: Credit for English will not be counted toward the B.S.R. Degree. 





First Year 


Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 4 


English 18 3 


Speech 11 


3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 3 


Geol. 2 1 


Sociol. 1 


3 


Rec. 1 


3 


Rec. 11 3 


Geol. 5 3 


Rec. 102 


3 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


Hist, elective (W) 3 


Rec. 5 2 


Math. 21 (W) 


2 


Dance 5 ( W ) 


1 


Music 10 (W) 3 


Rec. 12 3 


Psych. 1 (W) 


3 


P.E. 33 or 




Psych. 1 (M) 3 


P.E. 54 (W) 2 


P.E. 66 (W) 


1 


14 (W) 


1 


Dance 5 ( M ) 1 


Art 30 (W) 3 


Dance 132 (M 


) 1 


P.E. 35 (W) 


1 




Music 10 (M) 3 


P.E. 54 ( M ) 


o 


P.E. 50 or 








Math. 3 (M) 


3 


52 (M) 


1 










P.E. 53 (M) 


2 










W 


-15 


W-16 


W-17 


W- 


-15 


M 


-15 


M-14 


M-15 


M- 


-15 




rhird 


Year 


Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Core A Elect. 


3 


Pol. Sci. 120 3 


Rec. 282 3 


Rec. 202 


3 


Rec. 107 


3 


For. 140 3 


Rec. 145 3 


Rec. 271 


3 


P.E. 130 


1 


Rec. 104 3 


Sociol. 


Journ. 212 


3 


Safety Ed. 127 


2 


Lit. elective (W) 3 


(200 level) 3 


Psych. 101 


3 


Econ. 51 (W) 


3 


Dance 132 (W) 1 


Elective (W) 3 


Electives 


6 


Safety Ed. 181 




Elective (W) 3 


Drama 100 (W) 3 






(W) 


2 


Econ. 51 (M) 3 


Drama 101 (W) 1 






Elective (W) 


3 


Drama 100 (M) 3 


For. 142 (M) 2 






Art 30 (M) 


3 


Drama 101 (M) 1 


Electives (M) 6 






Lit. elective ( M ) 3 


Safetv Ed. 181 








Hist, elective (M) 3 


(M) 2 








W 


-17 


W-16 


W-16 


W- 


-18 


M 


-18 


M-18 


M-17 


M- 


-lcS 



During the summer between the junior and senior years and when upper level 
recreation courses have been completed, all majors are required to do at least eight 
weeks of supervised recreation leadership field work. The selected agency in which 
the student will do his work must be approved by the chairman of the department. 
Arrangements will be made for supervision and visitation. The final report and evalu- 
ation by the student must be completed by the end of the succeeding semester. 



FORESTRY 



71 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Forestry 

1. The Profession of Forestry. I. 1 hr. (Required only for students who rank as 
freshmen in the Division of Forestry.) Survey of the profession of forestry 
and the opportunities available to foresters. 

3, 4. Forestry Convocation. I and II. Xo credit. All students are expected to attend 
the weekly convocation. Attendance is required of students during their first 
four semesters in the Division of Forestry. Speakers and timely topics in 
forestry and allied fields are presented. 

11. Forest Ecology. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 67. Forest and environment factors; site and 
type characteristics. 

21. Forest Mensuration. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 3 and Math. 4. Introduction to 
statistics and basic sampling concepts. Measurement of forest products, trees, 
stands, growth, and yield. 

106. Forest Surveying and Mensuration Field Practices. S. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 67, C.E. 
5, For. 21. The application of surveying and mensurational practice with 
emphasis on field problems. 

107. Forest Management, Utilization, and Wildlife Practices. S. 3 hr. PR: For. 106. 
Study of forest management utilization, and wildlife problems. Trip to ob- 
serve forest management and utilization in the Southern Pine Region. 

109. Wood Industries Field Trip. S. 2 hr. PR: For. 135. A trip of two-weeks' dura- 
tion to observe manufacturing methods and techniques of commercial wood 
industry plants. Plants visited will include: furniture, plywood, veneer, hard- 
board, particle board, pulp and paper, sawmilling, and preservation. 

110. Wildlife Summer Field Trip. S. 2 hr. PR: For. 141 or consent. A two-week- 
Iong field trip designed to acquaint wildlife students with major wildlife habi- 
tats outside of the Central Appalachians and with selected major wildlife 
refuges, shooting preserves, and other intensively managed areas. A summer 
of approved work experience in the wildlife field may be substituted for this 
course. 

130. Wood Technology. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 67. For students other than those taking 
the Wood Industry or Wood Science option, designed to provide familiarity 
with the technical aspects of wood utilization. 

131. Wood Identification. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 67. Identification of commercial tim- 
bers of l'. S.; basic properties and uses of different woods. 

L32. Properties of Wood. I. 3 hr. PR: for. 131. Physical and mechanical properties 
of wood: testing, machining, gluing, finishing, and special processing of wood. 

134. Primary Conversion and (trading. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 131 or consent. Principles 
of the conversion of raw materia] in log form to primary wood products. Ele- 
ments of (he mailing ol raw materials and primary products. Production plan- 
ning and control. Primarily (or wood industry and wood science. 

L35 Secondary Manufacturing Processes. II. 2 hr. PR: For. 131 or consent. De- 
tailed study of the materials and processes involved in the manufacture of 
secondary wood products. Primarily for wood industry and wood science 
majors. 

136. Wood Processes and Products. II. 3 In. PR: For. 21. The conversion of stand- 
ing timber into piiman and secondary products. 



72 



140. West Virginia's Natural Resources. I, II. 3 hr. Survey of policies and practices 
in development and use of soil, water, forest, wildlife, mineral, and human 
resources in West Virginia. 

141. Wildlife Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 61 and Biol. 2 or Zool. 2. Basic 
principles of handling wildlife as a forest crop, including population dynamics, 
ecological relationships, social behavior, habitat manipulation, and game ad- 
ministration. 

142. Recreational Developments. II. 2 hr. BR: C.E. 6. For. 106 and 107. Needs of 
the active ami passive recreationist and moans of supplying facilities for meet- 
ing these needs in public forests. 

146. Ornithology. II. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 1, 2, or consent. Identification, distribution, 
and ecology of birds (particularly of forest lands). 

147. Fundamentals of Nature Interpretation. II. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing or con- 
sent. Methods and techniques of interpreting the natural environment to in- 
dividuals and groups. 

152. Approved Summer Park Experience and Report. S. 1 hr. PR: Junior standing. 
One summer's experience in the management of a park or related recreational 
enterprise followed by a written report. 

170, 171, 172, 173. Forestry Problems. I, II. 1 hr. ea. For seniors only (4 hr. 
max.). 

183. Farm Woods Management. II. 3 hr. (Professional forestry students may not 
take this course for credit.) Characteristics of forest trees; management of 
farm woods for timber, wildlife, watershed protection, and recreation; measur- 
ing and marketing farm timber; plantation establishment. 

204. Principles of Forestry Economics. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51 and 52 or equiv. The 
economics of production, distribution, and use for forest goods and services. 
Emphasis is on analytical methods and techniques in dealing with forest eco- 
nomic problems. 

212. Silvicultural Systems. I. 4 hr. PR: For. 11. Principles of regeneration cuttings, 
intermediate cuttings, and cultural operations, with their application to forest 
stands. 

213. Forest Genetics and Tree Improvement. I. 3 hr. PR: Genet. 171 or equiv., or 
consent. A study of forest genetic principles and their application to forest 
tree improvement including crossing methods, selection systems, and other 
tree improvement techniques. 

214. Advanced Principles of Forestry Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51 and 52 or 
equiv.; For. 204 or equiv. Intensive study of both micro- and macroeconomics 
of forestry. 

216. Regional Silviculture. I. 2 hr. PR: For. 11, PR or cone: For. 212. Major forest 
types of the United States; their composition, management, problems, and 
silvicultural treatment. 

217. Forest Management Plans. II. 2 hr. PR: For. 123. Analyses of forest manage- 
ment plans. Construction of a sustained yield timber management plan for a 
specific forest tract. 

218. Principles of Artificial Forestation. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 11. Seeding and planting 
nursery practice; phases of artificial regeneration. 

220. Forest Policy and Administration. II. 3 hr. (Upperclassmen only). Forest policy 
in the United States; important federal and state laws; administration of pub- 
lic and private forests; problems in multiple-use forestry. 

222. Forest Mensuration. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 21. The measurement of growth and 
yield; statistical methods applied to forest measurement problems. 

FORESTRY 73 



223. Forest Management. I. 4 hr. PR: Summer Camp, PR or cone: For. 212. The 
principles of sustained yield forest management. Organization of the forest 
an a, selection of management objectives, application of silviculture] systems, 

and regulation of the cut. The forest management plan. 

224. Forest Finance. II. 2 hr. PR: Junior standing. Interest, discount, and rate 
earned, in forest production and exploitation. Particular reference to the prob- 
lems of forestry such as determining the value of standing timber, the ap- 
praisal of forest damages, and forest taxation. 

225. Wood Finishing. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 130 or consent. A technical course in wood 
finishing covering surface preparation, composition of finishing materials, 
equipment, techniques, defects, troubleshooting, and quality control. 

226. Remote Sensing of Environment. II. 2 hr. PR: Math. 3 and Math. 4. Prin- 
ciples of measurement and interpretation of natural resources and environ- 
ment from photography, radar, infrared, and microwave imagery. 

230. Forest Products Protection. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 131, 135 or consent. Study of 
the biological organisms responsible for the deterioration of wood products 
and their control by representative methods. 

231. Wood Microstructure. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 131, Senior standing, or consent. A 
detailed examination of wood microstructure as it relates to processing, be- 
havior, and identification. 

232. Mechanical Properties of Wood. I. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 102. Properties and be- 
havior of wood as a structural material. 

233. Principles of Industrial Forestry. I. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing or consent. 
Analysis and case studies of problems pertinent to the integration of wood 
conversion technology with principles of production, marketing, and manage- 
ment. 

235. Wood Moisture Relationships. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 131. A study of the prin- 
ciples involved in wood processes and wood behavior concerning water or 
other fluids. 

238. Statistical Quality Control. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 135 or consent. A study of 
methods used to control quality of manufactured wood products. Control 
charts of variable and attributes. Acceptance sampling techniques. 

239. Theory and Practice of Wood Adhesion. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 131 and 132, or 
consent. Examination of different types of adhesives and bonding techniques 
used in the wood industry. 

241. Wildlife Techniques. I. 3 hr. PR: For. 141, 145, Bot. 161, or consent. Field 
and laboratory techniques necessary in the management and study of wildlife; 
collection of field data, mapping, censusing, habitat evaluation, literature and 
reports are stressed. 

242. Wildlife Population Ecology. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 141, Statistics 211, or con- 
sent. Theory of population growth, population change, intraspecific and inter- 
specific relationships that are involved in the natural regulation of populations, 
and the effects on man of populations of wild game. 

243. Wildlife Ecology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2. Basic principles of animal ecol- 
ogy and their application to wildlife. Field and laboratory studies of major 
ecosystems important to wildlife, including management of these ecosystems 
for wildlife. 

244. Forest Zoology. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or Zool. 2. The relationship of mammals, 
reptiles, amphibians, and fish to the forest, with emphasis on the ecology and 
taxonomy of these groups. 

245. Principles of Wildlife Management. II. 3 hr. PR: For. 243 or consent. A 
Survey of the major game animals and the problems and principles involved 

in their management 

74 



251. Forest Fire Protection. I. 2 hr. PR: Upperclassmen only. Factors affecting 
forest fire behavior; preventive action, preparation activities and control of 
lincst fires; use of fire in forest land management. 

Recreation 

1. Introduction to Recreation. II. 3 hr. A framework into which the other recrea- 
tion courses with all their implications will fit. Recreation history, trends, con- 
cepts, relationship to other fields; surveys of national organizations, leaders, 
and literature. 

4. Recreation and the School. I. 3 hr. Open to students with at least sophomore 
status in physical education. Study of basic concepts of play, recreation, 
leisure, and their relationship to physical education. 

5. Introduction to Arts and Crafts in Recreation. I. 2 hr. Workshop course. Place 
of arts and crafts in recreation, their organization, and integration with other 
phases of recreation. 

11. Nature Recreation and Camping. II. 3 hr. PR: Recreation majors or consent. 
Lecture and workshop. Introduction to organized camping movement including 
purposes, camp sites, equipment, programs and leadership. Exploration of 
nature recreation and its relationship to community recreation and camping 
programs. 

12. Social Recreation. I. 3 hr. Lecture and workshop course. Place of social recre- 
ation activities, informal dramatics and music in community center, play- 
ground, camp and school extracurricular programs. 

102. Program Planning. II. 3 hr. PR: Rec. 1. Fundamentals for general program 
planning; considering needs, facilities, age groups, local customs, climatic 
factors, etc. Planning involved in playgrounds, indoor centers, playfields, parks. 
hospitals, voluntary agencies, industry, and camps. 

104. Functional Planning of Recreation Facilities. II. 3 hr. Lecture and workshop. 
Problems and principles governing the planning for functional and effective 
usage of facilities in recreation. Emphasis on playgrounds, playfields, indoor 
centers, parks, camps, and swimming pools. 

107. Recreation Leadership and Group Work. I. 3 hr. Meaning of leadership, its 
application to the field of recreation, and analysis of techniques. Examination 
of social group work method and its application particularly in national youth 
organizations. 

145. Field Work. 3 hr. Recreation majors are required to have at least 8 weeks of 
supervised recreation leadership field work, usually during summer following 
junior year and after completion of upper level recreation courses. Arrange- 
ments under the direction of chairman. 

202. Philosophy of Recreation. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Interpretation of recreation 
as a basic part of the living process; importance to individual community, and 
national welfare; social and economic significance. 

204. Recreation Hobbies. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Rec. 1 or equiv. Lecture and workshop, 
Value of hobbies to youth and adults; participation in various types of hob- 
bies; methods of organization and presentation; nature and scope. 

206. Social Recreation for School-Age Groups. II, S. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. in Education 
or consent. Workshop course. Planning and conduct of social activities, parties, 
picnics, special events and other recreation experience adapted to home, 
church, and community. 

265. Leisure and Recreation. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Study of leisure as a social 
phenomenon in our modern culture and its implications for recreation. 

271. Administration of Camps and Preparation of Camp Counselors. II, S. 3 hr. 
PR: Rec. 11 or equiv. or consent. Principles involved in modern camping pro- 
grams; organizations and administration of camps. 

FORESTRY 75 



282. Administration of Recreation. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Major in recreation, or consent. 
General principles of administration; organization of staff administrative pro- 
cedures. Study of enabling laws, legal responsibilities, surveys, finance, pro- 
grams, facilities, and public relations. 

290. Outdoor Education and School Camping. 3 hr. PR: For majors in education, 
recreation, extension, forestry, or consent. Course designed to meet the needs 
of schools, colleges, and other education and conservation agencies interested 
in developing outdoor education programs. Emphasis is upon interpretation 
and programming of the outdoor education concept. 

293. Outdoor Recreation in Our Modern Society. 3 hr. PR: For persons in fields 
of recreation, park, outdoor education and conservation, or consent. Interpre- 
tation as to what it is, what people do, where they go, how this affects our 
economic, social, and cultural life, and significant trends. 



76 



The Appalachian Center 

WEST VIRGINIA CENTER FOR 
APPALACHIAN STUDIES AND DEVELOPMENT 



The pioneers in the land-grant movement intended to establish institutions 
through which knowledge and learning could become an effective part of the daily 
lives of the American people. West Virginia University is such an institution. 

With the establishment of the West Virginia Center for Appalachian Studies 
and Development in 1963, the University brought a new approach to off-campus 
education. Special public educational skills— extension, consulting, research, planning, 
organizing— were mobilized into one coordinated effort directed to the development 
and improvement of the State. 

The Center aims to serve, both on and off campus, as an intellectual cross- 
roads for social, cultural, and economic planning, to help mobilize the many special 
efforts of private and public agencies, to extend and to organize the available re- 
sources of the University so as to provide lifelong educational opportunities for more 
and more people, to assist young people through youth development programs to 
realize their potential competency, and to serve as a rallying point for gathering, in- 
dexing, and focusing knowledge for the Appalachian region. The Center also em- 
phasizes the sharing of knowledge and providing insights about processes and systems 
of decision-making so that public and private leaders may make better informed 
choices in individual, family, community, and government life. 

The Center gives greater recognition than has been true in the past to the 
importance of planning programs centered on community-wide problems, intra-state 
regional problems, and state-wide problems rather than on questions of individual 
groups. 

Field offices in each of the state's 55 counties and six area offices are integral 
parts of the Center. Thus there is a part of West Virginia University in every county. 
A University Extension Office— staffed with University Extension Agents— stands 
ready to assist agencies and organizations anxious to carry out projects which support 
state-wide developmental goals. West Virginia University is as near as the County 
Extension Office. 

Organization 

The work of the Appalachian Center is organized around four basic concerns 
of man: (1) man and his means (economic development); (2) man and himself and his 
family (human development); (3) man and his work, and (4) man and his environment, 
which includes not only the physical environment where we work and live, but the 
institutional environment of government and other public services. 

Division of Human Resource Development 

In this Division are grouped the off-campus activities of the Center which 
deal with the individual and his family. These include the 4-H youth program, Ex- 
tension programs for women, clergy leadership development, rural sociology, creative 
arts, and health services. In an increasingly dehumanized society, the major focus 
will be on developing the humanity of people. This Division is concerned primarily 
with education for "living." 



77 



Institute for labor Studies and Manpower Development 

The Institute for Labor Studies, established in 1964, offers educational and 
arch programs designed to meet the needs and interests of workers and their 
organizations, and draws upon the many faceted resources of the University to help 
meet the educational and informational needs of urban-industrial society. 

This Division also is responsible for leadership in mining and industrial edu- 
cation. Mining and industrial extension programs were originally organized to provide 
special training and to promote safety, efficiency, and conservation in the coal mining 
industry. This work has broadened in recent years to include the personnel of many 
industrial and public service groups. 

The focus is on education that will benefit the individuals and industries by 
providing training that permit people to upgrade their competencies and move into 
skill shortage areas. 

Development of our manpower resources is important for several reasons: 

(1) to attract new industry and to encourage expansion of firms already in the state, 

(2) to reduce poverty, (3) to accelerate the transition from a rural to an urban society, 
and (4) to give more people in West Virginia the opportunity to reach their full 
economic potentials. 

The Fire Service Extension program has had a steady growth in recent years. 
The primary target has been the volunteer and paid county and municipal fire de- 
partment personnel throughout the State. In addition, the Fire Service Extension pro- 
gram anticipates an increasing demand from industry, insurance companies, and 
municipal fire departments for trained fire protection personnel. 

Also a part of this Division's work is the Continuing Legal Education program 
wliicl i has expanded to help develop socio-legal reforms while maintaining traditional 
efforts to improve the legal education of attorneys. 

Division of Economic Resource Development 

This Division is responsible for programs and research which furnish informa- 
tion useful toward improvement of the economy and life in West Virginia. It has 
special responsibilities in interdisciplinary applied research and applied research re- 
quested by communities and by departments of State government, or which is jointly 
developed with them. It also serves as a source of current information in fields of in- 
dustrial, natural, and human resources. 

The Division includes the Water Research Institute, which has been desig- 
nated by the Governor for funding under the Water Resources Act of 1964, as well 
Lgricultura] production and marketing programs carried out by the Cooperative 
Extension Service within the agreement between the University and the United States 
Department of Agriculture. 

Agricultural production programs include decisions about the farm business 
organization, the prevention and control of plant and animal diseases and insects, soil 
and water management, and the selection and management of livestock and crops. 
\1 irketing and utilization of farm products includes helping people make decisions 
about grading, packing, storing, and selling products, and developing organizations 
and facilities lor effective buying, processing, and marketing. 

Other program areas include the Applied Technology Center which provides 
the industrial community with research findings and helps industry to apply this in- 
formation wherever possible, and the Continuing Business Education program which 
organizes and presents seminars and short courses for businessmen and owners of 

small businesses. 

Community and Environmental Development 

Tin's Division includes programs for both the physical environment ol space 
and buildings, as well as the institutional environment of groups, organizations, and 
governmental units. Subject matter includes public service facilities such as schools, 
air and water pollution, cultural opportunities in art, drama, and music, social in- 

stitnlions such as churches, government services such as police and lire protection, soil 

and watei conservation, and recreation. 
78 



Support Divisions 

There are three other Divisions in the Appalachian Center which primarily 
support the four program divisions. The Division of Program Implementation and Re- 
ports provides program leadership and liaison between the State staff and the area 
and field staffs. This Division also is responsible for the preparation of the various re- 
ports required by the U. S. Department of Agriculture for the various Cooperative 
Extension Service projects. 

The Division of Information and Educational Technology assists staff mem- 
bers of the Center to develop and use teaching materials which utilize the advances 
that have been made in educational technology. This Division also is involved with 
the preparation of subject matter and public affairs programming for radio, television, 
newspapers, and publications. 

The Division of Management and Program Services exercises fiscal control over 
the Appalachian Center and is responsible for fiscal and administrative affairs. This 
Division also exercises administrative responsibility for the Mont Chateau operation 
and the Jackson's Mill State 4-H Camp. 

The work given in extension credit courses is administered through the Divi- 
sion of Management and Program Services and corresponds in every particular to 
that given in the same courses on campus. Students taking extension courses for 
credit must satisfy all requirements for admission to the University and, before 
registering, must file with the Registrar of the University complete official transcripts 
of record. 

No more than 15 hours of work taken in graduate extension courses, or com- 
bination of extension credit and transfer credit, may be counted toward the Master's 
degree. For majors in the Division of Education of the College of Human Resources 
and Education, no more than 9 of these hours can be taken in extension prior to 
earning 6 hours in Education in residence in the University. For other regulations on 
graduate extension courses for Education majors see the College of Human Resources 
and Education section of the current Graduate School Announcements. Other colleges 
of West Virginia University will have special requirements. For these refer to the 
appropriate section of the Graduate School Announcements. 

No University extension courses may be offered without the approval of the 
Dean of the Appalachian Center. Library and laboratory facilities for each course 
must be approved by the Dean. Reference books for the use of extension students 
may be borrowed from the University Library subject to the approval of the Library 
Committee. Postal charges must be paid by the individual or groups for whom the 
books are borrowed. 

A fee of $12.00 per semester hour and a $12.00 off-campus enrollment fee are 
charged for each extension course offered. 

The Appalachian Center offers thirteen reading courses through correspond- 
ence. While these courses are offered in cooperation with the West Virginia Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs, any adult may enroll for any of these courses by applying to 
the Director of Management and Program Services, Appalachian Center. The fee is 
SI. 00 per course. The reader sends in short reports on the books he reads in each 
course. When the course has been satisfactorily completed, a progress card from the 
West Virginia University Appalachian Center is awarded. These courses carry no 
University credit but are designed to provide adults with some of the best reading 
materials in the areas covered through this program. 



APPALACHIAN CENTER 79 



STAFF 

Ronald L. Stump. M.S., Acting Dean; Acting Director, Cooperative Extension Service. 



ECONOMIC RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

Frederick A. Zeller, Ph.D., Director, Economic Resource Development; Associate Pro- 
fessor, Economics. 

Joseph G. Barrat, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Plant Pathology; Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Janice A. Conley, A.B., Research Assistant. 

Robert B. Crawford, M.S., Management Specialist; Instructor, Managemt nt Continu- 
ing Education. 

Chester L. Dodson, M.S., Director, Water Research Institute; Chairman of Water Re- 
source; Assistant Research Professor, Hydrology. 

Joseph C. Emch, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Animal Husbandry; Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Carl F. Engle, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Soils; Associate Professor. 

Jack R. Fowler, B.S., B.A., Research Associate. 

James T. Guill, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Animal Husbandry; Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Carter S. Hall, M.B.A., State Extension Specialist— Forest ry Industry; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Wood Technology. 

N. Carl Hardin, Jr., M.S., State Extension Specialist— Horticulture; Associate Professor. 

Beryl A. Johnson, B.A., Research Associate. 

Robert O. Kelley, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Dairy; Assistant Professor. 

William E. Kidd, Jr., M.S., State Extension Specialist— Forest Management; Assistant 
Professor. 

Harold P. Marshall, M.S., Research Associate, Planning; Assistant Professor, Political 
Science. 

Byron W. Moore, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Poultry; Assistant Professor. 

Clifford D. Porter, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Agronomy; Assistant Professor. 

Arthur W. Selders, M.S.Agr.Eng'g., State Extension Specialist— Agricultural Engineer- 
ing; Assistant Professor. 

James R. Shaffer, M.S. 1. 1']., Project Director and Engineering Technology Specialist 
Instructor. Industrial Engineering. 

Leonard M. Sizer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology, and Rural Sociology. 

Wilbur J. Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Research Professor of Economics. 

James Stitely, M.B.A., Project Manager, Continuing Business Education; Instructor in 
Commerce. 

George E. Toben, M.S., State Extension Specialist, Agricultural Economics; Professor. 

Benjamin W. Wamsley, Jr., M.S., State Extension Specialist— Animal Husbandry; 
Associate Professor. 

Jack B. Wilson. Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Plant Pathology; Associate Pro- 
fessor. 



INS IT I I 11 I OR LABOR STUDIES AND MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT 

Richard W Humphreys, M.A., Director, Institute for Labor Studies and Manpower 
Development; Associate Professor of Economics. 

Charles T. Holland. M.S.E.M., Dean. School of Mines ; Din ctor. Milling and Indus- 
trial Extension Service; Professor of Mining Engineering. 

60 



Raymond H. Bohl, B.S., Assistant Director of Fire Service Extension. 

Stephen L. Cook, M.A., Assistant Professor of Labor Studies. 

Edward K. Dix, Ph.D., Assistant Director Labor Research; Assistant Professor of 

Economics. 
David G. Hanlon, LL.B., Director, Continuing Legal Education. 
Roscoe Hanna, Jr., B.S., Supervisor, Mining Industrial Extension; Assistant Director, 

Fire Service. 
Kenneth Lilly, B.S., Research Assistant, Mines, and Engineering Experiment Station. 
George H. Pudlo, B.S.E.M., Assistant Director, Mining and Industrial Extension. 
Roger H. Rines, B.A., Assistant Project Director. 
Richard Sams, Project Associate. 
Owen A. Tapper, M.A., Assistant Director, Labor Education; Assistant Professor of 

Economics. 
Melvin Tate, Project Associate. 



HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 

Beryl B. Mauer, Ph.D., Director, Human Resource Development. 

Laddie R. Bell, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Charles Cochran, M.S., Director, WVU National Youth Science Camp; Associate 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Carl P. Cummings, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Harley V. Cutlip, M.S., State Extension Program Leader— 4-H Youth Programs and 
Camp Director; Instructor in Education. 

Mildred E. Fizer, M.S., State Chairman— 4-H and Youth Development Programs; 
Acting State Chairman, Extension Education Program for Women; Instructor 
in Education. 

Carl M. Frasure, Jr., M.S., Continuing Education Program Specialist and Instructor. 

Eleanor M. Glenn, B.S.H.E., State Extension Program Leader for Women. 

Ruth K. Jones, M.S., State Extension Specialist; Assistant Professor of Family Re- 
sources. 

Reita J. Marks, M.Ed., State Extension Program Leader— 4-H Youth Programs. 

Francis H. McClung, M.S., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Winthrop Merriam, Jr., M.S., State Extension Program Leader— 4-H Program. 

John D. Photiadis. Ph.D., Research Professor, Sociology. 

John A. Schultz, Ph.D., State Extension Specialist— Child Development and Human 
Relations; Associate Professor. 

Sylvia C. Shapiro, M.Ed., State Extension Program Leader for Women; Instructor in 
Home Economics. 

Glenn Snyder, Jr., B.S.. State Extension Program Leader— 4-H and Youth Develop- 
ment; Assistant Professor, Animal Industry and Veterinary Science. 

Edward A. Sprague, M.S., Associate Professor, Music. 

Clara M. Wendt, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Consumer and Food Economics; 
Assistant Professor, Family and Consumer Economics. 



COMMUNITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT 

Harold M. McNeill, Ph.D.. Director. Community and Environmental Development. 
George H. Breiding, B.S., State Extension Program Leader— Outdoor Recreation; 
Assistant Professor, Forestry. 

APPALACHIAN CENTER 81 



Clifford W. ("oilier, Jr., M.L.A., State Extension Specialist— Landscape Architecture; 

Assistant Professor, Horticulture. 

S. Wayne Cox, M.S., Civil Defense Adult Education Instructor. 

Richard C. Franklin, Ed.D., Professor of Education and Sociology, Community 
Leadership Development. 

Stanley H. Livingstone, M.S., Coordinator, Civil Defense, University Extension. 

Ernie B. McCue, M.A., Coordinator— Civil Defense; University Extension, Adult Edu- 
cation Instructor. 

Elmo W. Miller, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Resource Development; State Ex- 
tension Program Leader— Rural Civil Defense. 

Galen S. Myers, M.S., State Chairman— Community Resource Development and Title 
I Program Leader. 

David O. Quinn, A.B., M.S., State Extension Program Leader— Safe Use of Pesticides 
and Chemicals; Assistant Professor. 

George Sharpe, M.S., State Extension Specialist— Soil Conservation; Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Charles D. Thomas, M.S., Instructor in Civil Defense. 

Larry G. Tracewell, M.A., Consultant and Instructor in Civil Defense. 



INFORMATION AND EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

Leighton G. Watson, A.B., Director, Information and Educational Technology. 

Jack Belck, M.S. J., Research and Publications Editor. 

Francis L. Blake, M.S.J., State Extension Editor— Radio and Television; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Journalism. 

Joyce A. Bower, B.S.J.E., State Extension Editor— News. 

David Creel, Photographer. 

Joseph L. Fasching, M.S. Ext. Ed., State Extension Editor— News. 

Dennis R. Godfrey, A.B., State Extension Editor— Radio and Television. 

Betty A. Guill, M.A., State Extension Editor— Project Development; Instructor, 
Clinical Studies. 

Foster G. Mullenax, M.S.J., State Extension Specialist— Learning Resources; In- 
structor, Agricultural Education. 



MANAGEMENT AND PROGRAM SERVICES 

Junes C. Summers, M.B.A., Director, Management and Program Services; Director, 
Appalachian Center Business Office; Instructor in Management. 

Wilfred Burgie, B.S., Manager, Mont Chateau Lodge. 

Michael Caruso, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Robert B. Conner, M.B.A., Assistant Director, Conference and Institutes; Instructor 
in Management. 

Harley Cutlip, M.S., Camp Director, State 4-H Camp; Instructor in Education. 

Steve R. Hanna, B.S., Assistant Director, Slate ill Cam)); Assistant State Extension 
Leader 4-H. 

foe E. Kirby, I'd. I).. Educational Specialist. 

John R. I.ohr, Assistant Manager, Mont Chateau. 

Paul R. Martinelli, Business Office Manager. Appalachian Center. 

Arthur I.. Mom's. Jr., A.B., Program Chairman, Title /. and Program Leader— Ex- 
tended Credit Program. 

David Puzzuoli, Ed.D., Assistant Professor; Education Development Specialist. 

82 



PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION AND REPORTS 

Ronald L. Stump. M.S., Director, Program Implementation and Reports; Assistant 

Professor, Economics. 
Jack R. Fowler, B.S.B.A., State Extension Specialist— Management Information. 
Claude R. Kemper, M.S.Agr., Assistant Director, Program Audit. 
Carol P. McGhee, A.B., Assistant Extension Specialist— Management Information. 



BECKLEY AREA 

Oscar C. Hutchison, M.S., Area Director, Beckley Area Appalachian Center; In- 
structor in Agricultural Education. 
Lawrence Cavendish, M.S., Area Program Chairman. 

William N. Grafton, M.S.F., Area Extension Specialist; Assistant Professor, Forestry. 
Roger S. Karsh, M.S., Area Extension Specialist— Resource Development. 
Maurice Spencer, B.S., Extension Education Coordinator. 

Boone County 

Joan M. Toler, B.S.. County Extension Agent— 4-H . 

Fayette County- 
George D. Siehl. M.S., County Extension Agent; Beatrice F. Whanger, B.S.H.E., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Ethel H. Banks, B.S.H.E., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Robert J. Arthur, B.S., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Logan County 

Wilbur D. Dye, M.S., County Extension Agent; Robert D. Baldwin, Instructor, 
Mining Extension; Luther B. Ferguson, Instructor, Mining Extension. 

McDowell County 

Billie J. Hairston, M.S., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Engene H. 
Mitchell, M.S., County Extension Agent— 4-H; Jesse Cole, Instructor, Mining 
Extension. 

Mercer County 
Richard H. Cutlip, B.S., County Extension Agent; Margaret M. Meador, B.S., County 
Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Mary C. Reed, B.S., County Extension 
Agent— Home Demonstration (Mercer, Wyoming). 

Mingo County 

John L. Marra, B.S., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Raleigh County 

Mary N. Godbey, B.S.H.L., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Ralph D. 
Cole, B.S., Instructor. Mining Extension. 

Summers County 
Robert M. Baber, M.S., County Extension Agent; Elizabeth R. Bare, M.S., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Wyoming County 
Roscoe Plumley, M.S.. County Extension Agent: Victor H. Gilkeson, Jr., M.A., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H (McDowell, Wyoming); Man- C. Reed, B.S., County 

Extension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

APPALACHIAN CENTER 83 



CHARLESTON AREA 

Bruce John, M.S.. Area Director: Assistant Professor, Sociology. 

Wendell G. Marston, M.S.. Area Extension Specialist— Resource Development; Assis- 
tant Professor, Commerce. 
Julia Lowery, B.S., WVU Extension Agent. 
Mary K. Pullen, M.S., WVU Extension Agent. 
Thomas E. Woodall, B.A., WVC7 Extension Agent. 
Wylene P. Dial. M.A., Extension Education Coordinator. 

Cabell County 
Violet H. Brandon. A.B., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Clay County 
Patricia A. Ravenscraft, B.A., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Kanawha County 

Brooks, Daugherty, M.A., County Extension Agent; Camille C. Stewart, M.A.. County 
Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Paul A. Allen, M.S., University Ex- 
tension Agent; Margie I.. Crawford, B.S.H.E., County Extension Agent— 4-H; 
Jacqueline H. Maxwell, M.A., County Extension Agent— 4-H; Charles B. Max- 
well. A.B., County Extension Agent— 4-H; Ulysses G. Carter, B.S., Instructor. 
Mining Extension; Harold Hustead, B.S., Instructor, Fire Service. 

Lincoln County 

John M. Curry, M.S., County Extension Agent; Ruth A. Lawson, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H . 

Mason County 

Carl H. Cook, M.S.. County Extension Agent; Gilbert V. Barnette, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H; Audrey L. Emery, B.S., County Extension Agent—Home 
Demonstration. 

Nicholas County 
Norman L. Rexrode, M.S., County Extension Agent; Helen F. Cole, M.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; B. Rush Butcher, M.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H; Lawrence D. Phillips, B.S., Instructor, Mining Extension. 

Putnam County 
William P. Johnston, B.S., County Extension Agent; Jane T. Cox, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H; Charloette R. Critchfield, B.S., County Extension Agent — 
Home Demonstration. 

Wayne County 
Cyrus Cram, M.S., County Extension Agent; Betty X. Smith, A.B., County Extension 
Agent— 4-H. 



KEYSEB AREA 

Franz I. Taylor, M.S.. Area Director. Keyset Area Appalachian Center. 

B. Annette Shipe, B.S., Area Program Chairman. 

Vnthony Ferrise, M.S., Area Extension Specialist Resource Development. 
Victoria Goens, A.B., irea Extension Agent Low Income Programs. 
Norvin I.. Bowyer, M.S.. Area Tourism and Resource Development Specialist. 
Eugene J. Efarnei M.S.. Area Extension Agent. 

84 



Berkeley County 

Arlen R. Brannon, M.S., County Extension Agent; Velma B. Johnson, B.S.H.E., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; John R. Young, B.S., County 
Extension Agent— A-H. 

Grant County 

Emery L. Prunty, M.S., County Extension Agent; Howard B. Hardy, M.S., County 
Extension Agent— A-H . 

Hampshire County 

S. Porter Smith, M.S., County Extension Agent; Betty J. Deyman, County Extension 
Agent— Home Demonstration. 

Hardy County 

William L. Clark, M.S., County Extension Agent; Annie H. Shobe, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; Howard B. Hardy, M.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— A-H. 

Jefferson County 
J. E. Saville, M.S., County Extension Agent; Shirley R. Riley, B.A., County Extension 
Agent-A-H. 

Mineral County 

Betty J. Wagoner, B.A., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

Morgan County 

Edward L. Riley, B.S., County Extension Agent. 

Pendleton County 

John W. Hammer, M.S., County Extension Agent; Judith Baisden, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— A-H. 



MORGANTOWN AREA 

Joseph L. Morris, M.S., Area Director, Morgantown Area Appalachian Center; 

Assistant Professor, Agricultural Education. 
Alan S. Komins, M.P.A., Area Program Chairman; Instructor. 
Morris E. Mowery, Jr., J.D., Area Extension Specialist. 

Barbour County 

George C. Mouser, M.S., County Extension Agent; John L. Loyd, M.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— A-H; Rella L. Butcher, B.S.H.E., County Extension Agent- 
Home Demonstration. 

Brooke County 

Emma L. Noe, M.S., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Beverly K. 
Stevens, B.S.A.I., County Extension Agent— A-H. 

Hancock County 

Oliver W. Johnson, B.S., County Extension Agent; Lee Ann Loos, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent-A-H; Reta G. Clegg, A.B., County Extension Agent-Home 
Demonstration. 

Marion County 
Dayton J. Michael, M.S., County Extension Agent; Fairy A. Downs, M.A., County 
tension Agent-A-H; Glenn L. Eye, M.S., County Extension Agent; Geraldine 
Belmear, M.S., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

APPALACHIAN CENTER 85 



Marshall County 
Donald A. Hutchison, M.S.. County Extension A^ait; Rebecca II. Rig^s. B.S., County 
Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Hallcy J. Hubbs, A.B.. County Ex- 
d nsion Agent— 4-H; Peter P. Mintreas, B.S., Instructor. Mining Extension. 

Monongalia County 
Arthur D. McCutcheon, M.S.. County Extension Agent; Asel L. Kennedy, B.S., 

Assistant County Extension Agent; Lowell R. Shaw. M.A., County Extension 
Agent— 4-H; Caroline Schnably, M.S., County Extension Agent— Home Demon- 
stration; Donald Bondurant, B.E.M., Instructor, Mining Extension. 

Ohio County 
W. Edgar Hooper, M.S., County Extension Agent; Mary M. Kerns, B.A., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; E. Susan Sharpe, M.S., County Exten- 
sion Agent— 4-H . 

Preston County 

Alton J. Anderson, M.A., County Extension Agent; Clifford K. Bucklew, B.S., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H; Mildred T. Lindley, M.S., County Extension Agent- 
Home Demonstration. 

Taylor County 
Woodbridge Stout, M.S., County Extension Agent; Helen H. Fleming, M.S.H.E., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; John L. Loyd, M.S., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Tucker County 

Ralph II. Dunkle, M.S., County Extension Agent; Elizabeth B. Nagle, B.A., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Wetzel County 

George A. Stickler, B.S., County Extension Agent. 



PARKERSBURG AREA 

Robert H. Stauffer, Ph.D., Dean, Parkersburg Center; Area Director, Parkcrsburg 

Area Appalachian Center; Assistant Professor of Education. 
Larry E. Yost, Ph.D., Area Program Chairman. 
Shirley Campbell, A.B., Extension Education Coordinator. 
Arun Basu, R. C. and D. Coordinator. 

Calhoun County 

Voras K. Haynes, B.S.Agr., County Extension Agent; Sharon K. Wells. County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

Jackson County 
Norman K. Speicher, B.S., County Extension Agent; Jean P. Conley, A.B., County 
Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Barbara L. Malone, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H; Robert Winder, B.A., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Pleasants County 
Mark T. Rennix, M.S.. County Extension Agent; Mary K. Spitznogle, B.S.. County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Ritchie County 
Ruth K. Moore. B.S.. County Extension Agent-Home Demonstration; Charles D. 
Cole, M.S., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 



Roane County 

Neil G. Hedrick, M.S., County Extension Agent; Ora A. Drake, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; John L. Winemiller, Jr., B.S., County 
Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Tyler County 

James C. Stiles, M.S., County Extension Agent; Ann J. Thomas, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; Mary K. Spitznogle, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H. 

Wirt County 

James L. Bailey, B.S., County Extension Agent. 

Wood County 

Jerry L. Lease, B.S.Agr., County Extension Agent; Jane E. Jones, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; Lyndall L. Jones, A.B., County Extension 
Agent— 4-H; Frances N. Smith, B.S.H.E., County Extension Agent— 4-H. 



WESTON AREA 

Howard Shriver, Ph.D., Area Director. 

Mary R. Bussard, B.A., Area Program Chairman. 

John R. Schabinger, Ph.D., Area Extension Specialist— Dairy. 

Joseph Yeager, M.S., Area Extension Specialist— Forestry; Instructor. 

Braxton County 

Charles W. Clayton, M.S., County Extension Agent; Ruby L. Holland, B.S.H.E., 
M.S.H.E., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

Doddridge County 
Henry A. Roush, M.S., County Extension Agent; Betty J. Ralston, M.S.H.E., County 
Extension Agent— Home Demonstration. 

Gilmer County 

P. Everett Mason, M.S., County Extension Agent; Freda Burke, M.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H. 

Greenbrier County 
James Van Metre, M.S., County Extension Agent; Vivian M. Richardson, M.S., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; James E. Johnson, M.S., 
County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

Harrison County 

Vernon A. Tacy, B.S.Agr., County Extension Agent; B. Stephen Smith, B.S.Agr., 
County Extension Agent— Agriculture; Donis R. Hannah, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration; Linda J. Wood, B.S., County Extension 
Agent— 4-H; Leland H. Winger, B.S., Instructor, Industrial Extension. 

Lewis County 
Lynn Spiker, M.S., County Extension Agent; Charles H. Collins, B.S., County Ex- 
tension Agent— 4-H. 

Monroe County 
Raymond E. Spencer, M.S., County Extension Agent; Eleanor J. Shanklin, B.S., 
County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Frederick L. Parker, B.S., 
County Extension Agent— 4-H. 

APPALACHIAN CENTER 87 



Pocahontas County 
Walter E. Jett, B.S., County Extension Agent; Ellsworth A. Buck, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— A-H; Betty R. Weiford, M.S., County Extension Agent— Home 
Demonstration. 

Randolph County 
Robert L. Hammer, B.S., County Extension Agent; Alice T. Tomer, A.B., County Ex- 
tension Agent— Home Demonstration: Charles E. Williams. M.S.. County Ex- 
tension Agent— i-H. 

Upshur County 
Judith M. Knorr, B.S.H.E., County Extension Agent— Home Demonstration; Ancil B. 
Cutlip, M.S., County Extension Agent— A-H. 

Webster County 

Harley A. Burton, B.S.Am., County Extension Agent; Thelma R. Pickens, County Ex- 
tension Agent— A-H. 



ss 



The College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Arts and Sciences includes a lower division which consists of work of 
the first and second years, and an upper division, which consists of work of the 
third and fourth years. 

Instruction in the College of Arts and Sciences is administered through the 
following departments and interdepartmental areas: 

Biology Mathematics and Astronomy 

Chemistry Philosophy 

Economics Physical Science 

English Language and Literature Physics 

Foreign Languages Political Science 

Ceology and Geography Psychology 

History Religious Studies 

Home Economics Social Science 

Humanities Sociology 

Library Science Speech 

The curriculum of the College of Arts and Sciences has these main objectives: 

I. General Culture. Work of the lower division is intended to complete what is 
usually termed "a general education." It rounds out the program of studies pursued 
in high school and promotes full development of the student as an individual and as 
a member of society. Ideally, the student should undergo a well-proportioned de- 
velopment intellectually, spiritually, physically, and emotionally. The end of such 
development should be an inner balance or stability on the basis of which further 
growth can take place. Development of the individual as a member of society is to be 
measured on terms of his or her usefulness and sense of responsibility to the social 
order. The student should develop the capacity of intellectual participation as a 
citizen in the community, state, country, and world. A general education should, 
therefore, provide for all students a meaningful experience appropriate to the indi- 
\iclual and social needs which all citizens have in common as members of a free 
society in the contemporary world. 

II. Specific Attributes: Most of the attributes of a general education can be 
placed in one of three categories: attitudes, areas of knowledge, and skills. 

The following attitudes should be maintained as a result of a general edu- 
cation: 

1. An attitude of tolerance or open-mindedness, characterized by a cosmo- 
politan outlook that will enable the student to see beyond the limits of his own pro- 
fession, his own economic status, and his own country. 

2. An attitude of truth-seeking characterized by scientific objectivity and 
motivated by intellectual curiosity. 

3. An attitude of intelligent appreciation towards nature and the arts that will 
us far as the student's own endowments will permit, help him in his esthetic and 
ethical choices; and 

4. An attitude of dispassionate self-appraisal, based on an understanding of 
his own nature and characterized by an awareness of his own mental strength and 
w eakness. 

The area of knowledge which should be common possession of all educated 
persons may be conveniently grouped into two divisions: 

1. A knowledge of man as a social and intellectual being, of his place in con- 
temporary civilization, and of that civilization's place in the history of man. 

2. A knowledge of man as an organism and of man in his relation, direct or 
indirect, to the biological and physical environment in which he lives. 

89 



Three basic skills are regarded as indispensable to all educated persons: 

1. That of self-expression or communication, involving writing, speaking, read- 
ing and listening. 

2. That of calculation, that is, a knowledge of, and some skills in, basic 
mathematics. 

3. A familiarity with at least one foreign language, not only as a useful skill, 
but also as a means of promoting tolerance and sympathetic understanding of peoples 
who do not speak our language. 



FACULTY 

Carl M. Frasure, Ph.D., Dean. 

Lloyd R. Gribble, Ph.D., Associate Dean. 

Biology 

Lila Abrahamson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

Betty Allamong, M.S., Instructor in Biology. 

Nelle P. Amnions, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Amir A. Badiei, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Charles H. Baer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

Elizabeth A. Bartholomew, M.S., Instructor in Biology and Curator— Herbarium. 

Jay Barton II, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Provost for Instruction. 

Herald D. Bennett, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

Arnold Benson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Robert L. Birch, M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

David F. Blaydes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

William N. Bradshaw, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

Hwa-Ruey Chen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Roy B. Clarkson, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Associate Chairman. 

Jesse F. Clovis, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

William Collins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Mullen O. Coover, M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Earl L. Core, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Curator of Herbarium. 

Jack Crissman, M.S., Instructor (part-time) in Biology. 

John Eichenmuller, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

R. H. Frist, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Lloyd R. Gribble, Ph.D., Professor of Zoology. 

Roland L. Guthrie, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology and Arboretum Director. 

Willis H. Hertig, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology. 

Henry W. Hurlbutl, Jr.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Edward C. Keller, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

Joseph Marshall, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ethel C. Montiegel, M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

Charles Norman, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

William Pegg, M.S., Instructor {part-time) in Biology. 

David Samuel, M.S., Instructor in Biology. 

Martin W. Schein. Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

Robert C. Spongier, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Richard Sutter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

l.i laud H. Taylor, ScD., rn>j,.s\<>r Emeritus of Zoology. 

Phillip H.iy Waggoner, M.S.. Instructor in Biology. 

90 



Leah A. Williams, M.S., Instructor in Biology. 
Theodore T. Ziegenfus, M.A., Instructor in Biology, 

Chemistry 
Roger V. Chastain, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Armand R. Collett, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry; Dean Emeritus, College 

of Arts and Sciences. 
John A. Gibson, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 
Keith Gosling, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
John Gruninger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
George A. Hall, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
James L. Hall, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
James B. Hickman, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 

George L. Humphrey, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Associate Chairman. 
Martha Hsu, Ph.D., Instructor of Chemistry. 
Charles L. Lazzell, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 
Allen Campbell Ling, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Denis W. H. MacDowell, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
William J. McCarthy, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Charles G. McCarty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Bailie J. McCormick, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Chester W. Muth, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
Armine D. Paul, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Carl R. Phillips, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Peter Popovich, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Arnold G. Scholten, Ph.D., Instructor (part-time) in Chemistry. 
John H. Strohl, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Vincent J. Traynelis, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Chemistry. 
Anthony Winston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Economics 
Vance Q. Alvis, Ph.D., Professor of Economu s. 
Lewis C. Bell, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
Robert D. Britt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Thomas C. Campbell, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. (On leave.) 
Betty Fishman, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Leo Fishman, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Finance. 
Woo Sik Kee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 
Dennis R. Leyden, B.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Raymond McKay, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Patrick Mann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
William H. Miernyk, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
John L. Mikesell, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Joseph Xewhouse, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics. 
Donald Pursell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Richard D. Raymond, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economies. 
Evan (). Roberts, Ph.D., Professor of Economies and Marketing. 
Gilbert Rntniaii, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economies. 
Robert J. Saunders, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economies. 
Kenneth L. Shellhammer, A.B., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY 91 



Wilbur J. Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Norman P. Swenson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
James II. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Economies. 
Royce J. Watts, M.S.. Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Fred A. Zeller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

English 

Ruel E. Foster, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of English. 

Mary R. Ashburn, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Joy Berkley, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Sophia Blaydes, Ph.D., Instructor in English. 

Sallie S. Board, M.S., Instructor in English (retired). 

Philip Bordinat, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Evelyn L. Bonar, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Frances B. Boyd, M.A., Instructor in English. 

J. P. Brawner, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Arthur C. Buck, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Mary C. Buswell, M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

Susan Carey, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Robert W. Clarke, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Mary Lou Clarkson, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Stephen F. Crocker, M.A., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Lloyd M. Davis, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Oreta H. Dawson, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Edna M. Dillon, M.A., Instructor in English. 

David W. Dowdell, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

John W. Draper, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Richard B. Eaton, Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Nicholas G. Ehle, Jr., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Nicholas G. Evans, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Mary Foglesong, M.A., Instructor in English. 

William W. French, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English and Assistant Chairman. 

Winston E. Fuller, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Jack W. Futrell, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Patrick W. Cainer, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

Avery F. Caskins, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Elaine Ginsberg, M.A., Instructor (part-time) in English. 

Thora Golz, M.A.. Instructor (part-time) in English. 

Michael Crant, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Janice Hatfield, M.A., Instructor in English. 

John I.. Hicks, Jr., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

Margaret I'. Hoke, A.M., Instructor in English (retired.) 

Martha C. Howard, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Nancy Hutcherson, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Doris J. Huzzey, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Betty Jo Hypes, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Carolyn Jacobs, M.A., Instructor in English. 
Margarel Jaquiss, MA.. Instructor in English. 

Ins M. Jennings, M.A.. Instructor in English. 
John H. Johnston, Ph.D., Professor of English. 

92 



Jane Join's. M.A., Instructor in English. 

Beatrice B. Law, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Sandra S. Leckie, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Daphne B. Lee, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Nell L. Leonian, M.A., Instructor in English (retired). 

Russell C. MacDonald, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

Mary N. Page, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of English. 

Virgil L. Peterson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

John Racin, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English. 

David Rankin, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Elizabeth F. Reed, M.A., Assistant Professor Emeritus of English. 

Kathleen G. Rousseau, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Aileen K. Shafer, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Samuel W. Shingleton, M.A., Instructor (part-time) in English. 

Mary Singer, Ph.D., Instructor (part-time) in English. 

Thomas Sloane, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Fred M. Smith, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of English. 

Elizabeth S. Spindler, M.A., Instructor in English. 

John F. Stasny, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Judith Stitzel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English. 

Celia J. Tower, M.A., Instructor in English (retired). 

Anne Weisser, M.A., Instructor in English. 

Jack Welch, M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

Duncan Williams, M.A., Visiting Professor of English. 

Foreign Languages 

Robert Stilwell, Ph.D., Chairman of Foreign Languages and Professor of German. 
Michel J. Beauchemin, M.A., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 
Laszlo Borsay, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Classical Languages. 
M. William Buechele, M.A., Instructor in German. 

Rafael R. Del Valle, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Latin American Area Studies. 
Emile G. Frere, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French. 

Eleanor R. Gibbard, M.A., Instructor in French and Foreign Language Examiner. 
Pablo Gonzalez, M.A., Assistant Professor of Spanish. 

Francisco Herrera, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of Latin Ameri- 
can Area Program. 
Donald T. Huffman, M.A., Assistant Professor of German. 
Victor J. Lemke, Ph.D., Professor of German. 
Matthew Lindroth, M.A., Instructor (part-time) in Swahili. 
Pedro Lintner, M.A., Instructor in French. 

Arthur C. McBride, Docteur de l'Universite de Bordeaux, Professor Emeritus of 

French. 
Warren F. Manning, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages. 
John Nagle, M.A., Instructor in Russian. 
Carlos Navarro, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Spanish. 
Bohdan Plaskacz, Ph.D., Professor of Slavic Languages. 
Jean-Pierre Ponchie, M.A., Assistant Professor of French. 
Joseph J. Prentiss, M.A., Instructor in Classical Languages. 
Joseph F. Renahan, M.S., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Armand E. Singer, Ph.D., Professor of Romance Languages and Chairman of 

Humanities. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY 93 



Claude C. Spiker, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages. 

Harley U. Taylor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of German and Associate Chairman. 

Rebecca E. Wade, M.A.. Assistant Professor of French. 

Herbert J. Wilner, D.H.L., Instructor (part-time) in Hebrew, 

Geology and Geography 
Dana Wells, Ph.D., Chairman ami Professor of Geology. 
Robert G. Corbett, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geology. 
Chester I.. Dodson, M.S., Assistant Professor {part-time) of Geology. 
Alan C. Donaldson, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
Harry M. Fridley, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Geology. 
William II. Gillespie, M.S., Instructor (part-time) in Geology. 
Milton T. Heald, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
Richard S. Little, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Geography. 
John C. Ludlum, Ph.D., Professor of Geology. 
Richard R. Pillsbury, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geography. 
John J. Renton, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Chester E. Zimolzak, M.A., Assistant Professor of Geography. 

History 

William T. Doherty, Jr., Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of History. 

Wesley M. Bagby, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

William D. Barns, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

John A. Caruso, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Oliver P. Chitwood, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Elizabeth Cometti, Ph.D., Professoi- of History. 

Charles W. Connell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Jason C. Easton, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History. 

Jack Hammersmith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

James W. Hess, Ph.D., Assistant Professor (part-time) of History. 

Ruth M. Hicks, M.A., Lecturer in History. 

James Hood, M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 

Elizabeth K. Hudson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History. 

Mortimer Levine, Ph.D., Professor of History. 

John A.Maxwell, M.A., Instructor in History. 

Kurt Rosenbaum, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Sara R. Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor Emeritus of History. 

Edward M. Steel, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History. 

Festus P. Summers, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of History and University Historian. 

Library Science 

Robert F. Munn, Ph.D., Director of Libraries and Chairman and Professor of Library 

Science. 
Stokely B. Gribble, M.S.L.S., Assistant Director of Libraries and Assistant Professor 

of Library Science. 
Clifford C. Ilamrick, M.L.S., Chief Reference Librarian and Assistant Professor of 

Library Science. 
Theodore Judy, M.A.L.S., Assistant Professor and Physical Science Librarian. 
Evelyn M. Kocher, M.S.L.S., Assistant Professor and Chief Catalog Librarian. 
Olive D. Lewis. M.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science. 
Victorine A. Louistall, M.S.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science. 

',1 



Mildred I. Movers, M.S.L.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science and Chief 

Acquisition Librarian. 
Virginia T. Perry, M.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science and Chief Circulation 

Librarian. 
Lorise Topliffe, M.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science and Chief Bibliographer. 

Mathematics 

J. C. Eaves, Ph.D., Chairman and Centennial Professor of Mathematics. 

Hand D. Peters, M.S., Associate Chairman and Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Donald F. Butcher, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Lorna D. Carlin, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Anand M. Chak, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Charles N. Cochran, M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Jean M. Coover, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. B. Cunningham, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Carl P. Cummings, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Hannibal A. Davis, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

James R. Dosier, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Joy B. Easton, M.S., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Helen Louise Godfrey, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Henry W. Gould, M.A., Professor of Mathematics. 

Judith C. Hall, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Robert E. Haiper, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Lois V. Heflin, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Dora S. Hennen, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Franz X. Hiergeist, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Jin Bai Kim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Mahendra K. Jain, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Alonzo Johnson, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Harry B. McClung, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Betty L. Miller, M.S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

George Edward Mitchell, Ph.D., Research Assistant Professor. 

John W. Randolph, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

A. L. Roark, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

H. M. Srivastava, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Phillip D. Stark, M.S., Instructor in Statistics. 

Joseph K. Stewart, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Edwin C. Townsend, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Vincent Uthoff, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Charles H. Vehse, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. 

Marvin L. Vest, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Ronson J. Warne, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Stanley YYearden, Ph.D., Professor of Statistics. 

Philosophy 

William S. Haymond, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Philosophy. 
John R. Cresswell, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy. 
Theodore M. Drange, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy. 
Thomas YV. Scharle, M.A., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY 95 



Physics 
Arthur S. Pavlovic, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Physics. 
F. Burr Anderson. Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Atam P. Arya, Ph.D.. Associate Professor of Physics. 
Irwin G. Clator, M.S., Instructor (part-time) in Physics. 
Stanley Fan, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Oleg Jefimenko, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
Arnold D. Levine, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
John L. Rodda II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Carl A. Rotter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
James M. Smith. M.S., Instructor (part-time) in Physics. 
Charles D. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
Richard Treat, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 
William E. Vehse, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 
David K. Walker, M.S., Instructor in Physics. 
Douglas B. Williamson, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Political Science 

John R. Williams, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Political Science. 

Philip G. Brown, B.A., Instructor in Political Science. 

Orrin B. Conaway, Jr., Ph.D., Benedum Professor of Political Science. 

Thomas M. Drake, M.A., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Carl M. Frasure, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Royal C. Gilkey, Ph.D., Professor of Political Science. 

Allan S. Hammock, M.A., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

John A. Jacobsohn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Peter Neal Kidman, M.A., Instructor in Political Science. 

Hong N. Kim, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Alan S. Komins, M.P.A., Assistant Professor (part-time) of Political Science. 

Robert E. Lanham, M.A., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

H. Peter Marshall, M.S., Assistant Professor (part-time) of Political Science. 

Sophia Peterson, M.A., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

George W. Rice, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

William R. Ross, M.A., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Harold J. Shamberger, M.P.A., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Irvin Stewart, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Political Science. 

David G. Temple, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Political Science. 

James B. Whisker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Rodger D. Yeager, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science. 

Psychology 
K. Warner Schaie, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Psychology. 
Paul B. Baltes, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
fames F. Carruth, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 
Phillip P. Comer, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
Charles D. Corman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
On in IP (joss. Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 
Oniii F. Curtis, I'h. I).. Professor of Psychology. 
Robert P. Decker, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

96 



Irving J. Goodman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
Larry H. Goulet, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Thomas E. Hammock, Jr.. Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Frank II. Hooper- Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Gilbert L. Ingram, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Alfred Jacobs, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training. 

Alfred MacDonald, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Roger F. Maley, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

L. Lynn Ourth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate Chairman. 

Lowell B. Parsons, Ph.D., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Eugene A. Quarrick, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Lewis B. Sachs, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

James N. Shafer, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

Religious Studies 
Manfred O. Meitzen, Ph.D., Chairman and Associate Professor of Religious Studies. 
Paul M. Bassett, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Religious Studies. 

Sociology 
Harold A. Gibbard, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Sociology. 
Ronald C. Althouse, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Richard A. Ball, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Bettye J. Broyles, B.S., Instructor (part-time) in Sociology. 
B. L. Coffindaffer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Richard Clarence Franklin, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
Bruce M. John. M.A., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Harold X. Kerr, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
Pedro Lintner, M.A., Instructor in Sociology. 

Hugo G. Xutini, Ph.D., Associate Professor (part-time) of Sociology. 
Ann L. Paterson, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
John D. Photiadis, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
Harry K. Schwarzweller, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology. 
William F. Schweiker, M.A., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Leonard M. Sizer, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology. 
I. Thomas Stone, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Joel M. Teitelbaum, M.A., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Finest A. Vargas, M.A.. Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Neil J. Weller, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

Speech 
Leonard M. Davis, Ph.D., Chairman and Professor of Speech. 
William L. Barnett, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
Robert YV. Bell, M.A.. Instructor (part-time) in Speech. 
Deborah Blackwood, M.A., Instructor (part-time) in Speech. 
Beverly C. Cortes, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
Mary Lucille DeBerry, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Marja Fear, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Speech. 
Juanita Field, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Kathleen Goodwin, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Betty S. Hall, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES FACc7L 7T 9 



James II. Ilenning, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Speech. 
LeRoy E. Kennel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Speech. 
Charles G. Manly, M.A.. Instructor [part-time) in Speech. 
Don J. Norwood, M.A., Assistant Professor of Speech. 
Elizabeth Norwood, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Enid Portnoy, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Carol Ramsbnrg, M.A., Instructor in Speech. 
Walter H. Rockenstein, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Speech. 
Lloyd W. Welden, Sr., M.A., Professor of Speech. 

Bureau for Government Research 

The Bureau for Government Research is concerned with studying and report- 
ing problems of state and local government. 

Philip G. Brown, B.A., Senior Research Analyst. 

Thomas M. Drake, M.A., Research Associate. 

Peter N. Kidman, M.A., Senior Research Analyst. 

Darrell V. McGraw, LL.B.. Counsel for Governmental and Legislative Affairs. 

William R. Ross, M.A., Associate Director. 

David G. Temple, Ph.D., Research Associate. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR SPECIALIZATION 

Work of the upper division provides intensive study in one or two fields of 
knowledge. It is based on the belief that an educated man or woman should not 
only know the fundamentals of several branches of study but should have a rather 
thorough knowledge of some selected field. The student concentrates on the major 
and one or two minors in the upper division. The curriculum is sufficiently flexible, 
however, to meet the needs and tastes of individual students without exposing the 
student to the disadvantages of the free elective system. 



THE MAJOR SUBJECT 

In the upper division the student concentrates on a major selected from the 
following list of subjects: 

Biology History Pre-Medicine 

Botany Home Economics Psychology 

Chemistry Latin Sociology 

Economics Library Science Spanish 

English Mathematics Speech 

French Philosophy Statistics 

Geography Physics Zoology 

Geology Political Science 

German Pre-Dentistry 



SCHOLASTIC STANDING, SCHEDULES, AND HONORS 

Undergraduate Honors Program 

Departments of the College of Arts and Sciences are permitted to establish 
undergraduate honors programs in conformity with the following provisions: 

(a) Admission to Honors. Students admitted to honors will normally enter the 
honors program ;it the beginning of the second semester of the junior year. 

95 



(b) Eligibility. The principal qualification for admission to the honors pro- 
m-am is ability to pursue independent academic work with vigor and imagination. A 
student will not qualify for admission to honors unless he has a cumulative grade- 
point average of at least 3.0 in all eourses completed by the end of the fifth semester, 
and a grade-point average higher than 3.0 in the honor subject. 

( c ) Program. The heart of the honors curriculum is a coherent program of 
independent work, equal to a 3-hour course per semester, through the last three 
undergraduate semesters. Normally the honors work in the second semester of the 
junior year and first semester of the senior year will consist of independent reading 
or laboratory work, and the writing of reports. In his final undergraduate semester 
the student will prepare a thesis. 

(d) Examination. Toward the end of the final undergraduate semester, the 
student must pass a comprehensive examination in the honors subject. The exam- 
ination will ordinarily be written, though the Department may also require an oral 
examination. 

Student Class Schedules 

Each student schedules his courses according to the curriculum he has chosen. 
A second-year student who has not completed all required courses listed in the first 
year of the curriculum that he is following will be required to schedule such courses 
before scheduling new courses. A student will not be registered for an upper-division 
course not provided in his lower-division curriculum unless he has satisfied all lower- 
division requirements or has scheduled the courses necessary to meet those require- 
ments. 

Withdrawal from scheduled classes will be permitted in an order reversed in 
priority from that stated in the preceding paragraph. 

Attendance 

The College of Arts and Sciences calls the attention of every student to the 
University regulation governing attendance: "Students are obligated to attend all 
classes, including laboratory sessions, for which they are registered. The student who 
is absent for any reason is responsible for work missed. Instructors are expected to 
report excessive absences to the dean and adviser. Students should understand that 
absences jeopardize their grade or continuance in the course." 

Faithful attendance, active participation, and prompt fulfillment of all class- 
room and laboratory assignments, exercises, and tests are evidence of the seriousness 
of purpose expected of a student enrolled in this college. For purposes of definition, 
any number of absences exceeding the number of credit hours in a course constitutes 
excessive absenteeism. Absences on the order of three times the number of credit 
hours in any course would immediately put the student's standing in jeopardy, and 
the instructor will report in writing such a case of delinquency to the adviser and to 
the dean. With or without special notice, however, the student will realize that his 
failure in such a course is highly probable. 

Allowance will be made for unavoidable absences occasioned by illness, in- 
jury, authorized University activities, and other compulsive causes; but a student who 
is absent for such reasons is expected to make up the work missed and to avoid 
further absences. No quota of "allowed cuts" is to be granted in any class. 



ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Arts and Sciences is conferred 
upon a student who complies with the general regulations of the University con- 
cerning degrees, satisfies all entrance, college, and departmental requirements. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science Degree is conferred upon a student who complies 
with the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all en- 
trance and college requirements, and completes the requirements of one of the fields 
listed below. 

The minimum credit requirements varies with the several departments offering 
programs leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree. The minimum requirement 
shall be no less than 134 hours in any area. 

For all details of the course of study leading to the Bachelor of Science De- 
gree, refer to the pages listed. 

1. Chemistry (see page 111). 3. Physics (see page 160). 

2. Geology (see page 142). 4. Statistics (see page 156). 



A SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A student who has received a Bachelor's Degree in one department or college 
of West Virginia University may become eligible for a second Bachelor's Degree by 
earning an additional 30 semester hours in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and meeting all requirements, departmental and otherwise, of the second 
Bachelor's Degree. 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL DEGREES 

In order to qualify for a baccalaureate degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, a student must present a minimum of 134 hours of credit. Credits earned 
in English 0, Mathematics 2, and Foreign Languages 1 and 2, if the student has 
earned two or more units in the same language in high school or other preparatory 
school, will not be counted toward the 134 hours. Four hours of Physical Education 
for women, if required, and two hours of Physical Education for men, if required, 
and, if elected by the student, as much as eight hours in first and second year 
courses in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies must be included within 
the 134 hours. 

When the student has established a minimum of 58 hours of credit with a 
grade-point average of 2.0 or better, he may enter the upper division. He must pre- 
• nt no less than 58 hours of credit in upper-division work in order to qualify for 
graduation. 

The maximum amount of credit accepted from a junior college accredited by 
the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools or other regional 
iccrediting associations will not exceed 72 hours. All courses completed in a junior 
college will be classified as lower division. No credit will be allowed for courses com- 
pleted in a junior college subsequent to attainment of junior or higher rank by the 

student at the University. 
100 



BASIC REQUIREMENTS 

I. Physical Education 1 Hr. 

For men 2 

For women 4 

II. Foreign Language 12 

Two years of study in one language. A student who presents two units of 
high school or other preparatory school credit in a language may elect to 
take University courses numbered 1 and 2 in that language, but no credit 
will be allowed. He may satisfy the language requirement, however, by 
completing courses 3 and 4 or other foreign language courses that may 
be approved by his departmental adviser. Fewer than 6 hours in courses 
numbered 1 and 2 will not be counted toward any degree. 

III. English Composition (English 1 and 2) 6 

A student who is assigned to English as a result of preliminary tests 
will be admitted to English 1 only after the successful completion of 
English 0. 

IV. Distribution Requirements: The subject groups A, B, C listed below de- 
fine the Core Curriculum requirements for all undergraduate students in 
the University. Lists of courses that satisfy the requirements of each of 
the groups are provided by the University committee on the core cur- 
riculum. These lists are the student's guide in the development of his 
course program. The group requirements may be satisfied by courses in 
either the lower division or the upper division. 

The student is required to complete courses in at least two of the subjects 
listed in each of the three groups. 

Group A: Art. Music, Ancient or Modern Foreign Languages and Literature 
(beyond credits submitted to meet requirements II, above), Litera- 
ture of the English Language, Philosophy, Humanities 12 hr. 

Group B: Economics, Geography, History, Psychology-, Political Science, 

Sociology, Social Science 12 hr. 

Group C: Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physics. 

Physical Science 12 hr. 

In satisfying the requirements of Group C the student must have 
laboratory experience. The College strongly recommends a full year in 
one science. 
V. Upper-Division Departmental Requirements in the major subject ( 18-24 
hours), and in one or more minor subjects if required by the depart- 
ment. 

VI. Electives as approved by the departmental adviser, to complete the mini- 
mum number of hours required for graduation. 
VII. An overall grade-point average of at least 2.0 is required for courses at- 
tempted in the major subject. Individual departments may require a 
grade of "C" or higher for certain specified required courses. 

A maximum of 42 hours in one departmental subject (as listed on p. 98) 
may be counted toward graduation. As much as 60 hours may be presented from a 
department that offers more than one subject (e.g. Foreign Languages). 

In the application of this rule, any course that is required of all students of 
the College (e.g. Freshman English) may be excluded from the hours computed for 
the major subject. 



■Two hours of physical education general program for men, to be taken during the first 
year of residence, and four hours of physical education general program for women, to be taken 
during the first and second years in residence, are required for graduation of students presenting 
fewer than 58 semester hours, unless previous credit has been allowed. 

ARTS AND SCIENCES DEGREES 101 



To establish a major sequence and to qualify for graduation, the student must 
have spent at least two semesters, and have accumulated a minimum of 30 semester 
hours, as an upper-division student in the department of his major, or under its 
guidance. 

No upper-division course in the major, taken at another institution, will be 
counted toward meeting the requirements of the major department except with the 
approval of the department chairman. 

Notes: 

Mathematics: The University requires proficiency "equal to that normally at- 
tained in two years of high-school mathematics." A student who on entrance fails to 
meet this standard will be required to take remedial work in mathematics. 

English Proficiency: The student who takes his Freshman English at West 
Virginia University must achieve a grade of "C" in English 2 or pass the English 
Proficiency Examination. All transfer students must pass this examination in order to 
qualify for graduation. Students for whom English 1 and 2 have been waived by the 
Department of English will not be required to take the English Proficiency Exami- 
nation. 

Work Completed in Other Colleges of the University 

In addition to ( 1 ) work conducted by other faculties but recognized as a 
regular part of the elective program of the College of Arts and Sciences, (2) work 
offered toward fulfillment of the Core Curriculum, (3) non-professional Education 
courses required for teacher certification, and (4) six hours of upper-division work 
in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies, a student may establish credit 
not to exceed 24 semester hours in approved courses outside the college. The credit 
that may be transferred from any one college or school shall not exceed 6 hours in 
upper-division work in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies; 21 hours 
in Education; and 15 hours in any other one college or school. Under this provision, 
clinical and skill courses taken in other schools or colleges will not be accepted for 
credit in the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Combined-Course Programs: In completing work for the Bachelor of Arts de- 
gree, the student may pursue prescribed Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental courses, or a 
combined program in Arts and Medicine or Arts and Dentistry. 

Education, Teaching Fields, and Teacher Certification-. A student who wishes 
to prepare for teacher certification may register during his first two years in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences while completing the General Education requirements. At 
the beginning of the junior year, he may transfer either to the upper-division in the 
College of Arts and Sciences, or to the College of Human Resources and Education. 
If he remains in the College of Arts and Sciences, he will satisfy the requirements 
in Education and in his chosen teaching fields while proceeding with the require- 
ments of his major department and subject in Arts and Sciences. 

PREMEDICAL AND PREDENTAL COURSES (134 Hours) 

The following sequence of courses is worked out for the guidance of students 
who are preparing for the study of Medicine, Dentistry, and the related professions. 
All of the required subjects are included. Leading medical and dental educators in 
the United States today are definitely in favor of a good genera] training rather than 
exclusive specialization in the so-called premedical sciences. 

It is recommended that all premedical and predental students plan to complete 
the requirements for the Bachelor ol Arts Degree-. University Core Curriculum re- 
quirements must be satisfied in order to receive the degree. 



102 





First Year 




Seconc 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Ilr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Chem. 115 3 


Psych. 1 3 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 1 4 


Physics 2 4 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Modern Foreign 


Modern Foreign 


Math. 3 


3 


Math. 4 


3 


Language 3 


Language 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Electives 6 


Electives 6 



18 



18 



17 



17 





Third 


Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Modern Foreign 


Modern Foreign 




Chem. 141 


4 Zool. 232 


5 


Language 


3 


Language 


3 


Zool. 231 


5 Electives 


11-12 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Electives 


8-9 




American or 




American or 










English Lit 


3 


English Lit. 


3 








Chem. 133 an 


d 


Chem. 134 and 










135 


4 


136 


4 








Zool. 231 or 




Zool. 232 or 










elective 


5 


elective 


5 









18 



18 



17-18 



16-17 



Many medical schools recommend that Chem. 133 and 134, and Zool. 231 and 
232 be taken the year preceding entrance to medical school. 

Candidates for the A.B. Degree in Premedicine or Predentistry must complete 
the following minimum number of credit hours in the subjects listed: English, 12 hr. 
(must include English 1 and 2, and 6 hr. of Literature); Foreign Language, 6 hr. 
(must include 3 and 4 or higher); Mathematics, 6 hr. (3 and 4 or higher); Chem- 
istry, 23 hr. (must include 15, 16, 115, 133, 134, 135, 136, 141); Zoology, 18 hr. 
(must include Biol. 1 and 2, and Zoology 231, 232); Physics, 8 hr.; Psychology, 3 
hr. Also required are 30 hours of non-science courses; and 58 hours of Upper Divi- 
sion courses, which may overlap the above. A minimum of 134 hours is required for 
the degree. 



COMBINED COURSES 

Special Requirements 

The Combined Degree is one wherein the student serves his senior year at the 
medical or dental school of his choice, and after successful completion of it, then 
receives his A.B. degree. Prior approval of the Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences of West Virginia University must be had before enrollment in a professional 
school, in order to receive the Combined Degree. Candidates for a combined degree 
in Premedicine or Predentistry are required to meet the special provision of either 
(a) or (b) below. 

(a) A minimum of 102 hours of credit must be completed in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of West Virginia University of which 32 hours must be from the 
upper-division courses. 

(b) A minimum of 70 hours of credits must be completed in the College of 
Arts and Sciences of West Virginia University of which 32 hours must be from the 
upper-division courses. This option would apply only to students bringing transfer 
credits and completing the first year of medicine or dentistry at West Virginia Uni- 
versity. 



PREMEDICAL AND PREDENTAL 



103 



Arts and Medicine or Dentistry (l.'>4 Hours) 

(Recommended Curriculum for a Combined Course 
in Arts and Medicine or Dentistry) 

Students who enter a School of Medicine or a School of Dentistry after the 
completion of a minimum of 102 hours, of which 32 hours must be upper-division 
courses, and who have satisfied all provisions of the College of Arts and Sciences 
regulations governing combined course programs, may receive the Bachelor of Arts 
Degree upon the successful completion of the first year of medicine or dentistry. 

A student who is a candidate for the A.B. degree under the provisions of the 
curriculum must submit, at the time of his acceptance and prior to his registration 
in an accredited School of Medicine or Dentistry, a petition for the degree to his 
adviser who will forward it with his recommendations to the Dean. If the petition 
is approved, the candidate will be recommended for graduation upon receipt of 
certification from the professional school by the Registrar of the University, to the 
effect that the candidate has successfully completed the first year of medicine or 
dentistry. 

First Year 

Same courses as the Curriculum for A.B. degree in Premedicine or Pre- 
dentistry. 



Second 


Year 


Third 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Chem. 115 3 


Psych. 1 3 


Modern Foreign 


Modern Foreign 


Physics 1 4 


Physics 2 4 


Language 3 


Language 3 


Modern Foreign 


Modern Foreign 


American or 


American or 


Language 3 


Language 3 


English Lit. 3 


English Lit. 3 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Chem. 141 4 


Chem. 134 and 


Core Electives 6 


Core Electives 6 


Chem. 133 and 


136 4 






135 4 


Zool. 232 5 






Zool. 231 5 


Core Electives 3 



17 



17 



19 



18 



The following minimum number of credit hours must be completed in the 
courses listed: English 12 hr. (must include English 1 and 2, and 6 hr. of Litera- 
ture): Foreign Language, 6 hr. (must include 3 and 4 or higher); Mathematics, 6 hr. 
(must include 3 and 4 or higher); Chemistry, 23 hr. (must include 15, 16, 115, 133, 
1.34, 135, 136, 141); Zoology, 18 hr. (must include Biol. 1 and 2, Zool. 231, 232); 
Physics, 8 hr.; Psychology, 3 hr. Also required are 15 hr. of non-science courses; 
and 32 hr. of upper division, which may overlap the above. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

(Not leading to the degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences). 

(A). Pre-Commerce Program 

Pre-Commerce students are expected to complete the Pre-Commerce program 
of study within their first two years of residence at the University. It is particularly 

important that Economies 51 and 52 be completed not later than the sophomore yea] 
since these courses are prerequisite for all upper-division courses in tin- College of 

Commerce. 

Applicants seeking admission to the College of Commerce for the purpose oi 
obtaining a degree must have earned at least 58 semester hours of credit in required 
.Hid approved elective courses in the Pre-Commerce curriculum .it a grade average oi 
not less than "C". No student will be admitted who has not completed Economics 51 
and 52, Accounting 51, and passed English 2 with a "('" or better at this institution 
oi passed the English Proficiency Examination. 

104 



Students must observe the University Core Curriculum requirements as to dis- 
tribution of elective courses. During the tour years, the student must complete 12 
hours of Group A electives including required Group A courses (Speech II and 
English 123), 15 hours of Group B electives other than Economics but including re- 
quired Group B courses ( Psych. J, Sociol. 1, and Pol. Sci. 2), and 12 hours of Group 
C electives including the required Group C courses (Math. 3 and Math. 8) from the 
list of approved elective courses. 





First 


Year 




Seconc 


Year 


First Sem? 


Hr. 


Second Sent. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Acctg. 51 3 


Acctg. 52 3 


Pol. Sci. 2 


3 


Math. 3 1 


3 


Econ. 51 3 


Econ. 52 3 


Psvchology 1 


3 


Sociology 1 


3 


Math. 8' 3 


Speech 11 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 2 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 2 1 


Elect.— Core C 


3-4 


Elect.— Core A 


3 


Elect-Core A 3 


Elect. Core A 3 


Electives 


2-3 


Elect.— Core C 


3-4 


Elect.-Core C 3 


Electives 3-4 






Electives 


2-3 


Electives 2-3 





15-17 18-19 17-19 16-17 

^he student deficient in Mathematics, as evidenced by the ACT score, must take Math. 2, 
the remedial algebra course, during the first semester in residence in order to prepare for Math. 3 
and Math. 8 required in subsequent semesters. 

2 A minimum of 128 hours of credit must be earned in subjects other than English 0, and 
Math. 2. 

(B). Pre-Education Curriculum 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education and 
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education are registered in the College of Arts 
and Sciences until they have completed 58 hours or more of academic work in the 
lower division of the College, with a grade-point average of 2.25. They then trans- 
fer to the College of Human Resources and Education, Division of Education. During 
the Pre-Education period students are advised to complete as many as possible of 
the courses in general studies required by the Division of Education and for State 
certification. 

In addition to the above general academic requirements, students preparing to 
teach in high school or elementary school are advised to complete as many as possible 
of the required academic courses in two teaching fields or one comprehensive field. 

The following is required for admission to the undergraduate programs in the 
Division of Education: 

1. A grade-point average of 2.25 on all work attempted. 

2. A grade-point average of 2.25 on all work attempted (2.00 grade-point 
average in each teaching field and in Education courses) for enrollment in the student 
teaching block. 

3. For registration in professional education courses beyond Education 106, 
student must complete requirements for Education 100. 

Teaching Certificates 

The Dean of the College of Human Resources and Education is authorized by 
the Board of Governors to recommend all applicants for teaching certificates. 

High-school teaching certificates may be obtained by students registered in 
the College of Arts and Sciences as well as in the College of Human Resources and 
Education, provided they meet the requirements for certification. To qualify for the 
elementary-school teaching certificate, the students will transfer to the College of 
Human Resources and Education at the beginning of the junior year. 

Candidates for the A.B. degree who wish to qualify for teaching certificates 
should indicate this fact to their adviser and plan their entire course with this in 
view. Unless this is done by the end of the freshman year, students may encounter 
difficulties in qualifying for the certificate by the time they receive their degree. 

As a check, students should consult each semester with the adviser of Pre- 
Education candidates for high-school or elementary-school teaching certificates, in 
the Pre-Education Office or in the Office of Student Advising and Records in tin- 
Division of Education. 

PRE-PROFKSSIONAL COURSES 105 



(C). Pre-Journalism Studies 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism are registered 
in the College of Arts and Sciences until they have earned at least 58 semester hours 
of college credit. Studies during the freshman and sophomore years are designed so 
that the student may fulfill nearly all University Core Curriculum requirements, 
while at the same time exposing himself to the varied areas of study so that he may 
intelligently select a minor field and a journalism specialization upon entering his 
junior year. 

First Year Second Year 

Hr. Hr. 

Journalism 1 2 Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 2° 1 Journalism 19 3 

English 1 and 2 6 Physical Education (Women only) 2 

Physical Education 2 Core requirements 

Core requirements 

°Not required of students pursuing Specialization in Agriculture or Science. Broadcasting 
majors will substitute Journalism 80. 

(D). Curriculum in Pre-Medical Technology 

The curriculum which follows is designed to satisfy the course requirements 
for admission to the professional portion of the curriculum in Medical Technology 
offered by the School of Medicine. The Core Curriculum requirements must be satis- 
fied, and 64 hours total are required. 

Students are not transferred automatically from the pre-professional course 
( first two years ) to the professional course ( third and fourth years ) . Application for 
admission to the third year should be made on forms obtainable from the Office of 
the Associate Registrar, Medical Center; when completed, the forms are to be re- 
turned to that office. Preference is given to residents of West Virginia. 

Application should be filed before February of the second year. 



First Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. First Sem. 



Second Year 



First Sem. 

Chem. 15 4 

English 1 3 

Elective* 3 

Biol. 1 or Zool. 1 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Med. Tech. 1°* 1 Med. Tech. 2** 1 



Chem. 16 4 

English 2 3 

Math. 3 3 

Biol. 2 or Zool. 1 4 
Phys. Ed. 1 



Hr. Second Sem. 



Chem. 131 4 

Elective* 7-9 

Physics 1 4 

Phys. Ed. (W) 1 
Med. Tech. 3°° 1 



Hi 



Chem. 115 3 

Elective • 6-9 

Physics 2 4 

Phys. Ed. (W) 1 
Med. Tech. 4°* 1 



Max. Hrs. 18 16 Max. Hrs. 18 16 



16-18 



16-18 



do graduate study should take foreign language as 

Math. 2, if required, 



•Electives: Students who plan to 
Elective. Other recommended Electives fall in the Core Groups A and I 
should be taken here in the first year. 

"•Medical Technology 1, 2, 3, and 4 are not required subjects, but it is highly recom 
mended that all students take these courses. 



(E). Pre-Pharmacy Curriculum 

The professional curriculum of the School of Pharmacy is based on two years 
oi pre-pharmacy requirements. The pre-pharmacy requirements are as follows: 



Ugebra 3 hr. 

Trigonometry 3 hr. 

English Composition 6 hr. 

Principles of Economics 6 hr. 

Biolog) . ( General 8 hr. 

Chemistry, Genera] 8 hr. 

( In inistiA . ( )rganic 8 hr. 



Physics 8 hr. 

Electives from 

Core Croup A 12 hr. 

( lore ( Iroup B 6 hr. 



Total 



68 hr. 



106 



Students electing to take Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies will 
be exempt from an equivalent number of hours of electives in Core Croups A and B. 
A 2.0 cumulative average in all courses undertaken except Military Science, Aero- 
space Studies, and Physical Education, and a 2.00 cumulative average in all natural 
science courses undertaken is considered the minimum standard for admission. 

For admission to the School of Pharmacy, formal application should be made 
to the Admissions Committee of the School as early as possible after February 1, but 
before June 1, preceding the fall term in which the student is seeking enrollment. 
Complete information may be obtained from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, 
or from the Office of the Associate Registrar. Medical Center. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION AND CURRICULA 



BIOLOGY 

The Bachelor of Arts in Biology is designed to prepare students for professional 
careers in the life sciences within the framework of the basic Arts and Sciences pro- 
gram. The required courses of the curriculum may be supplemented by proper choice 
of elective hours to provide preparation for graduate work, professional health sci- 
ences, and secondary school teaching. 

Teacher certification requirements may be met at the same time A.B. degree 
requirements are fulfilled. The required work as prescribed by the Division of Edu- 
cation and the University Core Curriculum should be carefully planned with a 
faculty adviser to fit into elective spaces shown in the curriculum. 



SUGGESTED SCHEDULE OF COURSES FOR COMPLETING 
REQUIREMENTS FOR A.B. WITH A MAJOR IN BIOLOGY 





First Year 




Second Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Biol. 1° 


4 


Biol. 2* 


4 


Biol. 104* 4 


Biol. 103* 4 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Chem. 133-135* 4 


Chem. 134-136* 4 


Chem. 15° 


4 


Chem. 16* 


4 


Foreign Lang. 1 3 


Foreign Lang. 2 3 


Math.* (calc. 




Math.* 


3 


Electives 6 


Electives 6 


preferred ) 


3 


Elective 


3 






Elective 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 






Phys. Ed. 


1 











18 18 17 

'This course or its equivalent required of all biology majors. 



17 



Third Year 



First Sem. 
Biol. 121* 
Physics 1* 
Foreign Lang. 
Electives 



Hr. 

4 

4 

3 3 

6 



Second Sem. 
Biol. 173* 
Physics 2* 
Foreign Lang. 
Electives 



Hr. 

4 

4 

4 3 

6 



Fourth Year 

First and Second Sem. Hr. 

Biologv Electives** 7-8 

Electives*** 23-24 



17 



17 



°This course or its equivalent required of all biology majors. 
°°Must include at least one laboratory course. 
00 "Electives may be chosen not only from among University Core offerings, but also from 
courses in the College of Agriculture and School of Medicine and from the Departments of Chem- 
istry, Psychology, Mathematics, etc. 



BIOLOGY 



107 



Laboratory Fees 

A nonrefundable Fee is required of students taking the following laboratory 
courses in the Department of Biology: 



Course 

Biol 1 


Per Semester 

$ 8.00 

8.00 

10.00 

8.00 

8.00 

12.00 

12.00 


Cow 

Bot. 
Bot. 
Bot. 

Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 
Zool. 


256 

261 

262 
221 
231 
232 


Per Semester 
$ 8.00 


Biol 2 


8.00 


Biol. 103 
Biol. 121 . 
Biol. 215 

Biol 273 


8.00 

8.00 

12.00 

12.00 


Biol. 274 


233 

236 

237 


8.00 


Bot. 61 
Bot. 67 


4.00 

4.00 

4.00 

8.00 

8.00 


12.00 

4.00 


Bot. 68 


251 


8.00 


Bot. 104 
Bot. 161 


255 

263 

264 


8.00 
8.00 


Bot. 171 


5.00 

8.00 


8.00 


Bot. 221 


265 


4.00 


Bot. 231 


8.00 


271 


8.00 


Bot. 232 


8.00 


272 
276 
296 
297 


12.00 


Bot. 235 


8:00 


12.00 


Bot. 250 


8.00 


4.00 






4.00 


Biology 
Lower Division 







1, 2. General Biology. I, II. 4 hr. per sem. General introductory course. Students 
having credit in Bot. 1 and 2 or Zool. 1 and 2 may not get credit for these 
courses. 

Upper Division 

103. Plants As Organisms. II, S. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or equiv. An integrated 
study of the organism— development, structure, function, and evolution. (Not 
open to students who have had Botany 171). 

104. Animals As Organisms. I, S. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or equiv. An integrated 
study of the organism— development, structure, function, and behavior. (Not 
open to students who have had Zool. 271). 

121. Population Biology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1-2 or consent. A study of populations 
and their environmental relationships. 

161. Biosystematics. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or equiv. The development and 
principles of systematics as a logical outcome of speciation in plants and 
animals. 

171. Cell Biology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1-2, General Physics, Organic Chemistry or 
consent. A correlative study of cell structure and function beginning at the 
molecular level of organization and proceeding through different levels of 
complexity. 

L91. Honors Course. II. 3 hi. PR: Seeond semester of junior year, recommendation 
of adviser. Departmental majors only. Supervised reading and investigation. 

192. Honors Course. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 191. Supervised reading investigation. 

L93. Honors Course. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 192. Thesis embodying results of work 
done in Biol. 191 and 192. 

2d.",. Principles of Evolution. I. S. 3 In. PR: Biol. 2. Introduction to the study of 
evolution. 

108 



207. History of Biology. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2. History of the development of bio- 
logical knowledge, with philosophical and social backgrounds. 

208. Great Texts of Biology. II. 1 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Study of some of the 
great classics in biology, such as Theophrastus' Enquiry Into Plants, Vesalius' 
Epitome, Harvey's Motion of the Heart and Blood, Darwin's Origin of Spec- 
ies, and Mendel's Experiments on Hybrid Plants. 

215. Cytology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Cells, their structure and functions. 

274. Cellular and Molecular Biology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2, Chem. 238, and Physics 
2. A study of fundamental cellular activities and their underlying molecular 
processes. 

296, 297. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Critical studies of topics 
assigned by the instructor. 

Botany 

Lower Division 

61. Systematic Botany. I. 2 hr. Identification of vascular plants. Primarily for 
Forestry students. 

67. Dendrology (Angiosperms). I. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Classification and distribution 
of the angiosperm timber trees of the United States. Primarily for Forestry 
students. 

68. Dendrology (Gymnosperms). II. 1 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Classification and distribu- 
tion of the gymnosperm timber trees of the United States. Primarily for 
Forestry students. 

Upper Division 

104. The Plant Kingdom. II, S. 4 hr. Survey of the plant kingdom. Not open to 
Botany majors nor to students with credit in introductory botany. 

161. Systematic Botany. II. 4 hr. Identification and classification of vascular plants. 

171. Plant Physiology. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 15, 16, or equiv. Physiochemical pro- 
cesses of plants. 

191. Honors Course. II. 3 hr. PR: Second sem. of junior year and recommendation 
by adviser. Departmental majors only. Supervised reading and investigation. 

192. Honors Course. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 191. Supervised reading and investigation. 

193. Honors Course. II. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 192. Thesis embodying the results of the 
work done in Bot. 191 and 192. 

201, 202. Seminar. I, II. 1 hr. Topics of general interest to botanists are con- 
sidered. 

221. Plant Ecology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Environmental relationships of plants. 

224. Plant Communities. S. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2 or equiv. Field studies in 
ecology. 

227. Geographic Botany. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Study of plant groupings and 
world-wide distribution of plants. 

231. Plant Morphology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Development and structure of algae 
and fungi. 

232. Plant Morphology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Development and structure of bryo- 
phytes and vascular plants. 

235. Plant Anatomy. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Anatomy of seed plants. 

236. Plant Morphogenesis. II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 133; Bot. 235 or Biol. 215; Bot. 
171 or Genet 171. Experimental studies of plant growth and development. 

BIOLOGY 109 



250. Fresh-Water Algae. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Taxonomy, cytology, and 
ecology of aquatic, aerial, and land forms of fresh-water algae. 

255. Bryophytes. II. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Identification of liverworts and mosses. 

256. Vascular Crytogams. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 1, 2. Taxonomy, anatomy, cytology, 
and ecology of the club mosses, horsetails, and ferns. 

261. Advanced Systematic Botany. I. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 161 or equiv. Taxonomy of 
pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and monocotyledons. 

262. Advanced Systematic Botany. II. 3 hr. PR: Bot. 161 or equiv. Taxonomy of 
dicotyledons. 

263. Taxonomy of Vascular Plants. S. 3 hr. Field studies in the taxonomy of higher 
plants. 

265. Aquatic Seed Plants. I. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Classification, ecology, and 
economic importance of aquatic seed plants. 

266. Flora of West Virginia. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Consideration of 
native plant life of the State. 

268. Dendrology. II. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 2. Identification and classification of woody 
plants. 

296, 297. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem. PR: Consent. Critical studies 
of topics assigned by the instructor. 

Zoology 

Upper Division 

191. Honors Course. II. 3 hr. PR: Second semester of junior year, recommendation 
by adviser. For departmental majors only. Supervised reading and investiga- 
tion. 

192. Honors Course. I. 3 hr. PR: Zool. 181. Supervised reading and investigation. 

193. Honors Course. II. 3 hr. PR: Zool. 192. Thesis embodying the results of the 
work done in Zool. 191 and 192. 

210. Animal Behavior. I. 3 hr. Facts and principles of individual and group be- 
havior. 

222. Field Studies of Invertebrates. S. 3 hr. Taxonomy and ecology of the inverte- 
brates. 

223. Field Studies of Vertebrates. S. 3 hr. Taxonomy and ecology of the verte- 
brates. 

224. Limnology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Physical, chemical, and biological 
characteristics of inland waters with an introduction to principles of biological 
productivity. 

231. Comparative Anatomy. I. 5 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Organs and systems of 
various vertebrates, together with other facts of interest concerning those 
animals. 

232. Vertebrate Embryology. II. 5 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Introductory study of 
development <>1 vertebrates, based on frogs, fowl, and mammals. 

233. Comparative Histology. 11.4 hr. PR: Zool. 231 and consent. Limited to seniors 
and graduate students. Comparative study ol tissues ol the vertebrates. 

235. Comparative Development Anatomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Zool. 231. Anatomy and 
development of the organs and systems of various vertebrates. 

236. Comparative Neuroanatomy. II. 4 hr. PR: Zool. 231 and consent. Comparative 
study of development and anatomy of the nervous systems of vertebrates. 

110 



237. Osteology. I. 2 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Development and anatomy of the 
skeleton. 

251. Invertebrate Zoology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Advanced study of animals 
without backbones. 

255. General Parasitology. I. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. The biology of parasites. 

263. Ichthyology. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. Evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, 
and physiology of fishes. 

264. Fisheries Biology. II. 4 hr. PR: Biol. 2 or equiv. and Zool. 263. Fisheries 
management, emphasizing study of age and growth, population techniques, 
and concept of yield. 

265. Ornithology. II. 3 hr. PR: Biol. 1 or equiv., consent. Field and laboratory 
studies on identification, migration, protection, nesting, and food habits of 
birds. 

271. Human Physiology. I, II, S. 4 hr. Introductory course in the functions of man. 
This course may not be counted towards an advanced degree in biology. 

272. Physiology of the Endocrines. II. 4 hr. PR: Comparative anat., or vertebrate 
embryology, and organic chem. Regulation of the organs of internal secretion, 
mechanisms of action of the hormones produced, and experimental techniques 
used in study of the endocrine system. 

276. Comparative Physiology. I. 4 hr. PR: Zool. 273 or equiv. Study of the diverse 
ways in which different kinds of animals meet their functional requirements. 

296, 297. Special Topics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. Critical studies of topics 
to be assigned by the instructor. 



CHEMISTRY 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

The Bachelor of Science degree is designed for those students who desire to 
qualify for professional positions in industry and governmental services as well as 
those who plan to do graduate work in chemistry. Requirements for the Bachelor of 
Science degree are listed below. Electives must be chosen so as to satisfy the distri- 
bution of electives required for the A.B. degree. A total of 136 credit hours is re- 
quired of which a minimum of 126 hours must be established in subjects exclusive 
of credits earned in Military Science or Air Force Aerospace Studies, required 
Physical Education, English 0, and Math. 2. A second language, French or Russian, 
is recommended. Students desiring to pursue an honors program may include 4 to 6 
hours of Chemistrv 194 as ehemistrv electives. 





First 


Year 






Second Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Chem. 17* 


5 


Chem. 18* 


5 


Chem. 133 


3 


Chem. 134 3 


Math. 3 


3 


English 2 


3 


Chem. 135 


1 


Chem. 136 1 


Math. 4 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


Phys. 11 


4 


Phys. 102 4 


English 1 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


German 1 


3 


German 2 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Elect. (AandS) 3 


Math. 16 


4 


Math. 17 4 


Elect. (AandS) 3 






Elect. (A ar 


Ld S) 3 


Elect. (AandS) 3 



18 



16 



IS 



18 



and 18 



°Chem. 15, 16, and 115 will be required for those students not qualified for Chem. 1' 



CHEMISTRY 



111 





Third 


Year 


First Setn. 


Hr. 


Second Sent, II r. 


Chem. 101 


2 


Chem. 144 3 


Chem. 143 


3 


Chem. 146 2 


Chem. 145 


1 


Chem. 210 3 


Chem. 235 


4 


German 122 3 


German 121 


3 


Elect. (AandS) 3 


Elect. (AandS) 3 


Elect. (AandS) 3 



Fourth Year 

First Sent, and Second Sem. Hr. 

Chem. 242 3 

Chem. 222 3 

Chem. Electives 9 

Electives 18 



16 



17 



33 



Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry 

The course requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in 
chemistry are the same as for the Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry with the 
following exceptions: (1) The total number of hours is 128; (2) Chemistry 101 is 
not required; (3) Nine semester hours of general electives must be substituted for 
chemistry electives. 

Chem. 15 and 16 or Chem. 17 and 18 are prerequisite to all other courses in 
chemistry. Chemistry majors are required to take Chem. 15, 16, 111, and 115, or 
Chemistry 17 and 18, and the following: Chem. 101, 133, 134, 135, 136, 143, 144, 
145, 146, 210, 221, and 230. Math. 16 and 17; Physics 11 and 102, or the equivalent. 



Laboratory Fees 

A nonrefundable fee is required of all students who register for the following 
laboratory courses in Chemistry and Physical Science: 



Course 
Chem. 11 



Chem. 
( !hem. 
( Ihem. 
Chem. 
( !hem. 
Chem. 
( .'linn. 
( !hem. 
( !hem. 
( !hem. 
Chem. 



Per Semester Course 



12 10.00 



15 

16 

17 

18 

115 

131 

135 

L36 

141 



10.00 
10.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
12.00 
16.00 
16.00 
12.00 



Per Semester 



$10.00 Chem. 146 $16.00 



Chem. 192 

Chem. 194 

Chem. 202 

Chem. 210 

Chem. 220 

Chem. 235 
Chem. 239 
Physical Science 1 
Physical Science 2 



16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
10.00 
10.00 



145 16.00 



Note: A charge is made for excessive breakage in addition to the nonrefund- 
ible fee. 

Courses of Instruction in Chemistry 
Lower Division 

11. Survey of Chemistry. I. 4 hr. PR: English I or concurrent enrollment. Part 
one oi .i course designed primarily lor students who will not take more than 
"lie year <>l college chemistry. This course emphasizes the role and signifi- 
cance "I chemistrj in the modern world. The topics covered include: atomic 
structure; chemical bonding; acids, bases, and salts; perodicity; properties of 
'.'.iscmus. liquid, and solid states ol matter; a study of the chemistry of the 

more Common elements. Not open to students in Engineering. Two periods ol 

leer., I period of rec, 3 hr. of lab. each week. 

12. Surve) of Chemistry. II. 1 hr. PR: Chem. 11. A continuation of ('hem. 11 
with an introduction to organic and biochemistry. Two periods of lect., 1 
period of rec.. 3 hr. of lab. each week. 



//. 



15. Fundamentals of Chemistry. I, II. 4 hr. PR: English 1 and Math. 2 or equiv. 
or concurrent enrollment. A course designed for students who plan to take 
more than one year of college chemistry and for students in Engineering. 
This course will seek to develop terminology, a working knowledge of the 
conceptual foundations and quantitative relationships on which subsequent 
courses in chemistry will be built. Two periods of lect., 1 period of rec, and 
3 hr. of lab. each week. 

16. Fundamentals of Chemistry. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 15. Continuation of Chem. 
15. Two periods of lect., 1 period of rec, and 3 hr. of lab. each week. 

17. Principles of Chemistry. I. 5 hr. PR: High school chemistry and concurrent en- 
rollment in Math. 3 or more advanced mathematics. A more advanced treat- 
ment of the principles and theories of chemistry than offered in Chem. 15 
and 16. Primarily for students specializing in chemistry and chemical or 
metallurgical engineering. Three periods of lect., 1 period of rec, 3 hr. of lab. 
each week. 

18. Principles of Chemistry. II. 5 hr. PR: Chem. 17. A continuation of Chem. 17. 
Prerequisite for Chem. 143. Two periods of lect., 1 period of rec, and two 
3-hr. lab. periods each week. 

Upper Division 

101. Chemical Literature. I. 2 hr. PR: Organic Chem. Study of techniques of lo- 
cating, utilizing, and presenting information needed by the research worker 
in chemistry. Two periods of lecture each week. 

115. Introductory Analytical Chemistry. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 16. Volumetric 
analysis, gravimetric analysis, solution equilibria, spectrophotometry, separa- 
tions, and electrochemical methods of analysis. Two periods of lecture and 
two 3-hr. laboratories each week. 

131. Organic Chemistry: Brief Course. II. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 16. A one-semester 
course in organic chemistry for students in medical technology, agriculture, 
and home economics. Three periods of lecture and one 3-hr. laboratory each 
week. 

133. Organic Chemistry. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 16 or 18 and 135 or concurrent 
enrollment. Basic principles of organic chemistry, including modern structural 
concepts, the effect of structure on physical and chemical properties, reactions 
and their mechanisms and application to syntheses. Three periods of lecture 
each week. 

134. Organic Chemistry. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 133, 135, and 136 or concurrent 
enrollment. Continuation of Chem. 133. Three periods of lecture each week. 

135. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Chem. 133 or concurrent en- 
rollment. Fundamental organic reactions and the preparation of organic com- 
pounds. One 3-hr. laboratory each week. 

136. Organic Chemistry Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Chem. 133, 134, and 135 or 
concurrent enrollment. Continuation of Chem. 135. One 3-hr. laboratory each 
week. 

141. Physical Chemistry: Brief Course. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 16, Math. 4. A one- 
semester course in beginning physical chemistry covering the subjects of 
chemical thermodynamics, chemical dynamics, and the structure of matter. 
Three periods of lecture and one 3-hr. laboratory each week. 

143. Physical Chemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 18 or 115, Math. 16, and Physics L02. 
A first course in physical chemistry. Topics include a study of thermodynamics, 
solutions, am! chemical equilibria. Three periods of lecture each week. 

144. Physical Chemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 143 and Math. 17. A continuation o( 
Chem. 143. Chemical dynamics and the structure of matter. Three periods ot 
lecture each week. 

CHEMISTRY 113 



145. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. I. 1-2 hr. PR: Chem. 143 or concurrent en- 
rollment. Experimentation illustrating the principles of physical chemistry and 
offering experience with chemical instrumentation. One or two 3-hr. labora- 
tories each week. 

146. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. II. 1-2 hr. PR: Chem. 143, 144, and 145 or 
concurrent enrollment. Continuation of Chem. 145. One or two 3-hr. labora- 
tories each week. 

192. Undergraduate Research. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent. Individual investigations 

under supervision of an instructor. Three to nine hours of laboratory each 
week. 

194. Honors Course. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent. Research for students in the honors 
program. Thesis required. 

202. Selected Topics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Individual instruction under super- 
vision of an instructor. 

210. Instrumental Analysis. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 143 and 235. Basic instrumentation 
of analytical measurement. Electronics and instrument design. Methods of 
electrochemical and spectrochemical analysis. Two periods of lecture and one 
3-hr. laboratory each week. 

211. Intermediate Analytical Chemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 210. Basic concepts of 
analytical procedures and separations at an advanced level. Two periods of 
lecture and one 3-hr. laboratory each week. 

220. Techniques of Chemical Syntheses. II. 2 hr. PR or Cone: Chem. 221. Modem 
techniques involved in the preparation and handling of inorganic and organic 
materials. Inert atmosphere, vacuum system, high temperature and pressure, 
fractional crystallization, distillation, sublimation, chromatography, separation 
of isomers, non-aqueous solvents, microscopy and other special techniques. 
Two 3-hr. laboratories each week. 

222. Chemistry of Inorganic Compounds. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 242. A correlation of 
the reactions and properties of elements and their compounds based on modern 
theories of chemical bonding and structure. Topics include acid-base theory, 
non-aqueous solvents, ligand field theory and stereochemistry. Three periods 
of lecture each week. 

231. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 134. Structural concepts 
(orbital representations, resonance, stereochemistry), reaction mechanisms and 
synthetic applications (condensation reactions, nucleophilic substitution and 
addition) in organic chemistry at an advanced level. Three periods of lecture 
each week. 

232. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. II. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 231. Synthetic organic 
chemistry with particular emphasis on aromatic systems, oxidation and reduc- 
tion techniques, molecular rearrangements, and a review of recent synthetic 
methods. Three periods of lecture each week. 

235. Methods of Structure Determination. I. 4 hr. PR: Chem. 134 and 136. Both 
chemical and physical methods arc used to study unknowns. Application of 
physical methods (u.v., i.r., n.m.r., e.s.r., Raman and mass spectroscopy) to 
problems of organic chemistry with emphasis on structure elucidation. A prac- 
tical course lor students in chemistry and related fields who may need these 
methods in research and applied science 1 . Two lectures and two 3-hour 

laboratories per week. 

239. Organic Syntheses. II. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 136. Modern synthetic methods of 
organic chemistry. Two 3-hr. laboratories each week. 

241. Chemical Thermodynamics. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 144. Principles of classical 
and statistical thermodynamics and their application to chemical problems. 
Three periods of lecture each week. 

114 



242. Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure. I. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 144 and 210. 
An introduction to the quantum theory of chemical bonding. Atomic structure, 
theoretical spectroscopy, predictions of molecular structures and bond proper- 
ties. Three periods of lecture each week. 

244. Colloid and Surface Chemistry. II. 2 hr. PR: Physical Chemistry. Selected 
topics in the properties and physical chemistry of systems involving macro- 
molecules, lyophobic colloids, and surfaces. Two periods of lecture each week. 



THE PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

1, 2. Introductory General Course. I, II. 4 hr. per sem. This course is intended to 
acquaint the student with the physical world in which he lives, and particu- 
larly with the method and philosophy of modern science in its approach to 
an explanation of physical reality. The course has two main objectives: to 
serve as orientation for those students who have not chosen their major field 
of interest, and to present a broad general view of the physical sciences to 
students whose interests lie in other fields. Two periods each week are de- 
voted to lectures on the application of the scientific method to the solution 
of specific problems in chemistry, physics, geology, and astronomy. The third 
period is devoted to discussion of the mathematical background required for 
an appreciation of modern science, and to general lectures on the methods 
and philosophy of science. Students who have successfully completed as much 
as eight hours of chemistry or physics or geology cannot take Phys. Sci. 1 and 
2 for credit. Three periods of lecture, one period of discussion (optional) and 
one 2-hr. laboratory-demonstration period each week. 



ECONOMICS 

The College of Commerce offers all courses in Economics and grants the B.S. 
degree in Economics. The College of Arts and Sciences grants the A.B. degree in 
this field. 

The course of study leading to the B.S. degree is aimed primarily at preparing 
the student for a career as an economist in business or government. Consequently, 
the student selecting this program is required to complete courses in business ad- 
ministration, as well as courses in economics. About one-half of his upper-division 
electives must be taken in courses offered by the College of Commerce. 

The program leading to the A.B. degree in Economics is designed for students 
who wish to continue fundamental training in economics with a liberal arts educa- 
tion. Of the total of 128 hours required for graduation, 30 or more credit hours are 
available for elective subjects. There are two principal requirements which apply to 
the A.B. program, but do not apply to the B.S. program. These are the requirements 
that the student must complete 12 hours in a foreign language and 9 upper-division 
hours in a minor field other than economics. 

A candidate for the A.B. degree with a major in Economics must complete a 
minimum of 128 semester hours excluding required English 0, Mathematics 2, and 
Foreign Languages 1 and 2 if the student has earned two or more units in the same 
language in high school or other preparatory schools. He must also complete at least 
27 credit hours in upper-division economics courses. A minimum of 58 semester hours 
must be completed in the upper-division level. Of these, no less than 9 upper-division 
hours must be earned in a minor field approved by the candidate's adviser. 



ECONOMICS 115 



LOWER-DIVISION PROGRAM 

The curriculum of the lower division provides a background for the study of 
Qomics. The following courses are required and students are expected to com- 
plete them within the first two years in residence at the University: 

First Year Second Year 

Hr. Hr. 

I nglish 1 and 2— Composition 6 Economics 51 and 52— Principles 6 

Foreign Language 6 Foreign Language 6 
Hist. 1 and 2— World Civilization History 52 and 53— American History 

or Humanities 1 and 2 6 or Pol. Sci. 2 and 120 6 

Laboratory Science 8 Mathematics 3— College Algebra 6 

Phys. Ed.— Genera] Program 2 Mathematics 8— Finite Mathematics . 3 

Elecrives** 3 Phys. Ed.— Women's Program 2 

Speech 11— Oral Communication 3 

Electivcs-Men 00 9 

Electives— Women 00 7 

31 36 

°A laboratory science may be chosen from among biology, botany, chemistry, geology, 
physics, physical science, or zoology. 

° "Electives must be taken during the four-year program to satisfy the University Core Cur- 
riculum Requirements. See page 26 for a complete explanation of requirements. 



UPPER-DIVISION PROGRAM 

An Economics major must complete a minimum of 27 upper-division hours in 
Economics, including the following courses: 
Econ. 125— Statistics 
Econ. 130— Money and Banking 
Econ. 211— Micro Economic Analysis 
Econ. 212— Macro Economic Analysis 
Econ. 216— History of Economic Thought 
Icon. 241— Public Finance 

Thus, in addition to the above required courses, the candidate must complete a 
minimum of 9 semester hours of upper-division elective courses in Economics. 

Courses of Instruction in Economics 

Lower Division 

51. Principles of Economies. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Sophomore standing. Principles of 
resource allocation, income, output and price determination under different 
competitive conditions; money, banking, and monetary policy; national in- 
come, unemployment, and fiscal policy; taxation and government spending; 
international economics, underdeveloped areas, and comparative economic 
systems. 

52. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51. Continuation of Econ. 51. 

Upj)rr Division 

125. Statistics. I. II. 3 hi. PR: Math. 3. Basic statistical methods employed in col- 
lection, presentation, analysis, and interpretation <>i business and economic 
data, such as ,in;d>sis ol Frequenc) distribution, time series, inference, index 

numbers, and correlation. 

130. Money and Banking. I. II. 3 hr. Our system ol monetary and banking arrange- 
ments, viewed in relation to Functioning ol the economic system as a whole. 



'Economici 52 u ■< prerequisite to all upper-division courses in Economics. 



ne 



160. Labor Economics. I. II. 3 hr. Introduction to labor economics and labor re- 
lations in industry, including the interaction of economic forces, union poli< ies, 
personnel practices, and labor law. 

205. Can-rent Economic Problems. S. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51 and 52 or consent Edu- 
cation majors only. A course designed to acquaint public school teachers with 
reliable source material in economics and to instruct them in studying current 
economic problems. 

210. Comparative Economic Systems. I or II. 3 hr. Structure and processes of exist- 
ing economic systems throughout the world including review of basic prin- 
ciples of free enterprise, socialistic, communistic, and fascistic societies. Com- 
prehensive analysis based on current and recent experiments in these econ- 
omies. 

211. Micro Economic Analysis. I. 3 hr. Study of price and output determination 
and resource allocation in the firm under various competitive conditions. 

212. Macro Economic Analysis. II. 3 hi. Analysis of the forces which determine 
the level of income, employment, and output. Particular attention is given to 
consumer behavior, investment determination, and government fiscal policy. 

213. Economic Development. I or II. 3 hr. Comprehensive study of the problems, 
changes, and principal policy issues faced by non-industrialized countries in 
the process of economic development. 

216. History of Economic Thought. I. 3 hr. Economic ideas in perspective of his- 
toric development. 

220. Introduction to Quantitative Analysis. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 125. Study of 
the principal mathematical techniques employed in economic analysis; and 

introduction to econometrics. 

226. Advanced Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 125 or equiv. Advanced approach to 
statistical analysis with emphasis on probability 7 , inference, and multivaried 
statistical techniques. 

241. Public Finance. I. 3 hr. Governmental fiscal organizations and policy; taxes 
and tax systems with particular emphasis upon the Federal Government and 
the State of West Virginia. 

245. Government and Business. I or II. 3 hr. Government in its role of adviser and 
umpire: analysis of governmental policies and practices affecting business. 

246. Transportation. I. 3 hr. Development of an inland transportation system and 
relations and policies of transport agencies. 

250. International Economics. I or II. 3 hr. Development of trade among nations; 
theories of trade; policies, physical factors, trends, and barriers in international 
economics. 

255. Regional Economics. I or II. 3 hr. Analysis of the factors that promote or 
deter the economic growth of a region, with emphasis on such matters as 
population shifts, economic base studies, industrial location analyses, input- 
output techniques, regional income estimation, local multiplier and cycle con- 
cepts, and the role of government in regional growth. 

261. Trade Unionism. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 160 or consent. Analysis of the 
structure, government, attitudes, and policies of organized labor; the impli- 
cations of union policy. 

262. Collective Bargaining. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 160 or consent. Theory and 
practice of collective bargaining; including contract issues, types of relation- 
ships, and the role of government policy. 

263. Economics of Wages. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 160 or consent. Determination 
of wage levels and structure; functioning and organization of labor markets. 

ECONOMICS 117 



265. Economics of Social Security. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51 and 52 or consent. 
An examination and analysis of social and political efforts to provide economic 
security, including an examination of the parallel developments of private- 

insurance. 

270. Strategic Factors in American Growth. I or II. 3 hr. Regional impact of chang- 
ing methods of production and distribution. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

A student who expects to major in English should complete lower-division 
survey courses in English and American literature (English 3, 4, 5, and 6). These 
courses, however, are not absolute prerequisites to entrance into the program of major 
studies in English. If a student who is accepted as a major has not had the lower- 
division survey courses, he will be expected to compensate for this deficiency by 
taking certain upper-division courses that will be suggested by the departmental 
adviser. 

Advisers of upper-division students who are not English majors may schedule 
them for English courses in the "100" series without regard to prerequisites. In 
order to qualify for registration in a course in the "200" series, a student is expected 
to have had prior work in upper-division courses. 

Choice of Two Majors in English 

The requirements outlined in groups A, B, and C (below) are minimal. The 
English major is expected to complete a minimum of 42 hours in English exclusive 
of English 1 and 2. 

The prescribed upper-division program for majors in English requires the stu- 
dent to complete courses in both English literature and American literature and 
allows him to determine the relative emphasis he will give to each. Three upper- 
division courses (Group "A") are required of all majors. Credit for this group is 9 
hours. Twelve additional hours are chosen from groups "B" and "C" according to the 
student's desire to emphasize English literature or American literature. 

Group A ( 9 hr. required of all English majors ) : 

1. English 142. Shakespeare. 3 hr. 

2. English 234. Chaucer. 3 hr. 

3. English 230. History of the English Language. 3 hr. 

Choice of twelve additional hours of upper-division work, as follows: 
Emphasis on English Literature: 9 hr. from Group B; 3 hr. from Group C. 
Emphasis on American Literature: 3 hr. from Group B; 9 hr. from Group C. 

Group B: 

English Literature, 1660-1744. 3 hr. 
English Literature, 1744-1798. 3 hr. 
Elizabethan Poetry and Prose. 3 hr. 
Literature of the 17th Century. 3 hr. 
Sixteenth Century Prose and Poetry. 3 hr. 
Seventeenth Century Prose and Poetry. 3 hr. 
Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I. 3 hr. 
Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 hr. 
The Romantic Movement. 3 hr. 
Victorian Poetry. 3 hr. 
Victorian Prose. 3 hr. 

The departmental adviser may allow the substitution of certain cognate period 
courses in English Literature for any of those listed in this group; namely, courses in 
the literature of the Early English period, the Middle Ages, the 16th, 17th, 18th, 
19th, and 20th centuries. 

118 



1. 


English 138. 


2. 


English 139. 


3. 


English 140. 


4. 


English 141. 


5. 


English 244. 


6. 


English 245. 


7. 


English 247. 


8. 


English 248. 


9. 


English 249. 


10. 


English 257. 


1 1. 


English 258. 



1. 


English 166. 


2. 


English 222. 


3. 


English 239. 


4. 


English 250. 


5. 


English 261. 


6. 


English 262. 


7. 


English 270. 



Group C: 

American Fiction. 3 hr. 
Modern American Biography. 3 hr. 
Southern Writers. 3 hr. 
American Romanticism. 3 hr. 
American Drama. 3 hr. 

Study of Selected Authors (American). 3 hr. 
American Poetry. 3 hr. 
English majors are strongly advised to study a second foreign language. For 
the first choice of a foreign language, the Department recommends French or Ger- 
man. 

History 106 and 107 (British Civilization) are required of English majors. 
Courses in English Social History (204, 205) may be substituted for this require- 
ment by permission of the departmental adviser. 

Honors Program 

At the beginning of the second semester of his junior year, an English major 
who has achieved an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or better, and whose record 
in English studies is above 3.0, may apply for admission to the Honors Program of 
the Department. 

SUGGESTED SEMESTER PROGRAMS 
(Not of Teacher-trainees) 

The following course programs for the A.B. degree will satisfy requirements of 
the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of English. The student may 
find it necessary to rearrange the order in which certain of the requirements are 
listed. 



First 


Year 


Second Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


English 3 or 5 3 


English 4 or 6 3 


English 3 or 5 3 


English 4 or 6 3 


For. Lang. 3 


For. Lang. 3 


For. Lang. 3 


For. Lang. 3 


Core "C" 3-4 


Complete Core 


Science (Core 


Science (Core 


History 52 ( Core 


"C" 3 


Group "C") 3-4 


"C") 3-4 


Group "B") 3 


Complete Core 


History 1 (Core 


History 2 ( Care 


Course prelimi- 


"B" 3 


Group "B" 3 


Group "B" 3 


nary to Minor 


English ( or minor 






Subject 3 


subject) 3 


15-16 


15-16 


15-16 


15-16 


Add Phys. Ed., 


Add Phys. Ed., 


Add Phys. Ed., 


Add Phys. Ed., 


Mil. Sci. 


Mil. Sci. 


Mil. Sci. 


Mil. Sci. 



Third and Fourth Years 

The student will complete English 142, 230, and 234; courses to satisfy 12 
hours chosen from English groups "B" and "C" shown above; additional English 
courses to make a minimum of 42 hours exclusive of English 1 and 2; twelve hours of 
upper-division work in a chosen minor subject; History 105 and 106 (or History 204, 
205); electives necessary to complete required hours for the A.B. degree. 



Teacher Certification for English Majors 

Through careful planning, a student may within four years combine studies 
leading to the A.B. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, with major in English, 
and certification for teaching English in the secondary schools. Students interested 
in this combination should call at the English office for a special mimeographed 
summary of the requirements for teacher certification as correlated with the require- 
ments of the College of Arts and Sciences and the Department of English. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



119 



Lower-division students preparing for certification as English teachers, with 
\ B legre< in English, should b< especially careful to enroll for a foreign lan- 
guagi in addition to courses in the general-education program for teacher trainees. 

In order to complete the English Major and requirements for teacher certifi- 
cation m lour years, the student must choose the Language Arts (comprehensive) 
teaching field. Otherwise, he will have to complete the English teaching field AND 
one Other field. Ii the student wishes to attend summer school, or to take an extra 
year, he may qualify in two fields: English and one other. For requirements in vari- 
ous fields, set' the bulletin on teacher certification programs. 

Special notice should he taken of the fact that a lower-division student prepar- 
ing t"i teacher certification should take English 3, 4, 5, and 6, not English 35 and 
36, or 127 and L28. He should take English 111, not English 18. 



SUGGESTED SEMESTER PROGRAMS 
(Four-year course for teacher trainees) 





First Year 




Second 


1 Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


English 5 3 


English 6 


3 


For. Lang. 


3 


For. Lang. 


3 


Art 30 3 


Music 10 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Math. 21 2 


Math. 22 


2 


Biology 1 or 




Biology 2 or 




Speech 31 or 34 


Drama 75 


3 


Phys. Sci. 1 


4 


Phys. Sci. 


2 4 


or Drama 50 3 


For. Lang. 


3 


English 3 


3 


English 4 


3 


For. Lang. 3 
Soc. Sci. 1 3 


Soc. Sci. 2 
Health Ed. ] 


3 
L02 2 




16 




16 


17 




19 


Add Mil. Sci. 


and 


Add Mil. Sci. and 


Add Mil. Sci. and 


Add Mil. Sc: 


i. and 


Phys. Ed. 




Phys. Ed. 




Phys. Ed. 


Phys. Ed. 






Third Year 




Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 142 


3 


English 138, 


139, 


English 234 3 


Educ. 120 


4 


Speech 121 


3 


249, 257 or 


journ. 215 3 


Educ. 124 


6 


Hist. 106 or 204 3 


258 


3 


Educ. 109, 221, 


Educ. 161 


2 


Educ. 100, 105 4 


English 111 


3 


271, or 275 3 


English 230 


3 


Journ. 18 


3 


Drama 180 


3 


Speech Elec. 3 






English 140, 141, 


Hist. 107 or 


205 3 


English, Group 






244, or 245 


3 


Educ. 106 
English 166, 
or 270 


3 
250, 
3 


"B" Elec. 3 
English 118, 278, 
or 280 3 







19 



18 



18 



15 



The student may do well to re-arrange the course pattern 
Indent teaching during the first semester of the senior year. 



in order to do his 



0. 



Courses of Instruction in English Language and Literature 
Lower Division 

students who fail to qualify 



English Composition. I, II. 3 hr, 

for English 1 under Universit) 



Required of 

regulations. 

Composition and Rhetoric. I. II. 3 hr. Required of all candidates for the 

bachelor's degree in all colleges except for certain students of superior achieve- 
ment who nia> be exempted from the requirement under regulations prevailing 

at the time o| admission. Advanced sections are provided for students who 
made exceptionally high grades On the entrance tests in English. 



J 20 



2. Composition and Rhetoric. I, II. 3 hr. Required of all candidates for the 
bachelor's degree in all colleges unless the requirement for certain students 
of superior achievement is waived under regulations announced for the year 
of admission. Advanced sections are provided for students who made ex- 
ceptionally high grades on the entrance tests in English. 

3. Survey: English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. English authors from Beowulf to 
Burns and readings from their works. Upperclassmen may substitute English 
163 for this course. 

4. Survey: English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. English authors from Robert Burns to 
the present and readings from their works. Upperclassmen may substitute 
English 164 for this course. 

5. American Literature. I, II. 3 hr. American authors to 1870 with readings from 
their works. 

6. American Literature. I, II. 3 hr. American poetry and prose from 1870 to the 
present. Continuation of English 5. 

18. Advanced English Composition (Written and Spoken). I, II. 3 hr. PR: English 
1 and 2. Practice in the organization of thought and in the correct and effec- 
tive use of the language in writing and speaking, with emphasis on the various 
types and techniques of exposition. 

25. Introduction to Poetry. I, II. 3 hr. Nontechnical approach to poems selected 
for their intrinsic interest and ease of comprehension. 

26. Introduction to Fiction. I, II. 3 hr. Companion course to English 25 and Eng- 
lish 27 in the reading of works of fiction selected for their interest and sig- 
nificance to the general reader. Emphasis on appreciation and enjoyment. 

27. Introduction to Drama. I, II. 3 hr. How to read, enjoy, and judge significant 
plays. Designed for the general student, not the specialist, with a view to 
developing a lasting interest in dramatic literature. 

35. Types of Literature. I, II. 3 hr. Selected works of English, American and 
world authors, read for appreciation and enjoyment. Poetry and drama em- 
phasized. Designed particularly to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements. 

36. Types of Literature. I. II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 35, with emphasis 
on examples of prose fiction by English, American, and European writers. 
May be taken independently of English 35. 

Upper Division 

100. Honors Course. I, II. 3 hr. Independent reading and study. For students ad- 
mitted to the Honors Program in the second semester of their junior year. 

111. The English Language. I, II. 3 hr. Structure of the English language. Lin- 
guistic study designed especially for teachers of English in the secondary 
schools. Required of all teacher trainees preparing for certification in English 
or Language Arts. 

115. Creative Writing: Narration (Short Story). I. 3 hr. Purpose and pattern of the 
modern short story; study of examples in the current periodicals; special 
assignments and conferences with individual students on a minimum number 
of short storiev 

116. Creative Writing: Workshop. II. 3 hr. For students who have demonstrated 
ability in composition to explore their interests in writing fiction and verse. 

117. Creative Writing. II. 3 hr. A workshop for poetry. A course designed for stu- 
dents with a special interest in and talent for the writing of poetry, introduc- 
ing at an intermediate level various problems of form and technique. 

118. World Literature. I, II. 3 hr. Selected readings in the works of authors of 
world literature both ancient and modern. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 121 



L23. Business English. I, II. 3 lir. PR: English 18. Technical writing; assembling 
and analysis of economic and commercial data; writing of reports; business 
correspondence. Primarily for students enrolled in the College of Commerce. 

126. Advanced Composition. I, II. 3 hr. Technical forms of writing; designed 
particularly for students in science and engineering. 

129. Words and Usage. II. 3 hr. Practical vocabulary building, English grammar 
and usage. Attention is given to the derivation, history, and meaning of words, 
and to the principles of syntax and grammar. 

135. Introduction to Literature (Part I). I, II. 3 hr. Poetry and drama, read for 
understanding and enjoyment. A Core Curriculum course comparable to Eng- 
lish 35, for upper-division students. Should not be taken in addition to 
English 35. 

136. Introduction to Literature (Part II). I, II. 3 hr. A Core Curriculum course 
comparable to English 36. Prose fiction: stories and novels. For upper-division 
students. Should not be taken in addition to English 36. 

138. English Literature, 1660-1744. I. 3 hr. Literature from the Restoration to the 
death of Pope, exclusive of the drama. 

139. English Literature, 1744-1798. II. 3 hr. Literature from the death of Pope to 
the publication of Wordsworth's Lyrical Ballads, exclusive of the drama. 

140. Elizabethan Poetry and Prose. I. 3 hr. The Renaissance in England as mani- 
fested in the great variety of nondramatic literary works of the sixteenth 
century, with emphasis on the major writers of the reign of Elizabeth I. 

141. Literature of the Seventeenth Century. II. 3 hr. Major poets and prose writers 
of the seventeenth century, with the exception of dramatic writings. 

142. Shakespeare. I, II. 3 hr. Twelve of Shakespeare's most important plays. 

160. Contemporary Literature. I. 3 hr. Modern British and American poets and 
prose writers— including novelists, short-story writers, dramatists, and essayists. 
Chronology is roughly from 1900 to 1925. 

161. Contemporary Literature. II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 160 from approxi- 
mately 1925 to the present time. 

163. English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. Survey: English Literature from the begin- 
ning to 1800. May be substituted for English 3 but may not be elected by 
students who already have credit for English 3. 

164. English Literature. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 163 from 1800 to 
present. May be substituted for English 4 but may not be elected by students 
who already have credit for English 4. 

166. American Fiction. I, II. 3 hr. The reading of ten or more of the most im- 
portant American novels from Hawthorne to the present day, each considered 
as a work of art reflecting a significant view of life. Lectures on the works of 
principal authors, with class discussion of particular books. 

173. Poetry. I, II. 3 hr. Appreciation and enjoyment of poems through critical and 
analytical reading. Studies in the various types of poetry, and of the language, 
imagery, and techniques of poetic expression. 

175. The Short Story. II. 3 hr. A study of the short story's structure, history, and 
contemporary forms. 

ISO Bible Literature: Old Testament I. 3 hr. The various types of literature ex- 
emplified in the Old Testament, read for their intrinsic merit and for their 
historical and cultural significance. Continued in English 181. 

I SI. Bible Literature: New Testament and Apocrypha. II. 3 hr. The contents of 
the New Testament, its literary quality, with consideration of its historical 
relations and of the relationships of the several writers represented. Because 
of the difficulty of treating the wealth of materials of the Old Testament 



122 



(luring the one semester of English 180, the first part of this course will be 
devoted to continuation of the study of certain books of the Old Testament. 

198. Honors Course. I, II. 3 hr. For the first semester of the senior year of students 
admitted to the Honors Program. 

199. Honors Course. I, II. 3 hr. For students in the Honors Program; final semester 
of senior year. 

218. Creative Writing Advanced Workshop. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Designed for 
students who are seriously engaged in the writing of a major work. 

222. Modern American Biography. I. 3 hr. A selection of the most significant and 
interesting biographies and autobiographies of Americans of distinction in 
literature, the arts, and public life. 

223. Modern British Biography. II. 3 hr. Representative works by such eminent 
masters of biography as Lytton Strachey, Sir Osbert Sitwell, Lord David 
Cecil, Sean O'Casey, Hugh Kingsmill, and others. 

224. Literary Criticism. II. 3 hr. The history of literary criticism from Aristotle to 
modern times. 

225. Recent Literary Criticism. I, II. 3 hr. A brief survey of the theories and essays 
of four major schools of modern criticism and an application of these theories 
to a novel, a play, and to selected poems and short stories. 

228. Structure of the English Language. I, II. 3 hr. A course in historical, com- 
parative, and descriptive grammar, together with an introduction to English 
linguistics. 

230. History of the English Language. I. 3 hr. A study of the nature of the lan- 
guage; questions of origins, language families, development, relationships of 
English as one of the Indo-European languages. 

231. Old English (I). I. 3 hr. A study of Anglo-Saxon with selected readings from 
the literature of the period. 

232. Old English (II). II. 3 hr. PR: English 231. Beowulf and other texts in Old 
English. 

234. Chaucer. I. 3 hr. Early poems, Troilus and Criseyde, and The Canterbury 
Tales. In addition to an understanding and appreciation of Chaucer's works, 
the student is expected to acquire an adequate knowledge of Chaucer's 
language. 

235. Shakespeare. I. 3 hr. Intensive study of selected plays. Special attention to 
textual problems and to language and poetic imagery, together with the his- 
tory of Shakespearean criticism and scholarship. 

236. Shakespearean Comedies and History Plays. I. 3 hr. A study of representative 
comedies of Shakespeare against the background of classical and Renaissance 
theory and practice, and of selected history plays. 

237. Shakespearean Tragedy. II. 3 hr. A study of the principal tragedies of Shake- 
speare, together with the history of criticism, scholarly investigation, and in- 
terpretation. 

239. Southern Writers. II. 3 hr. Examination of twentieth-century Southern essay- 
ists, poets, short-story writers, and novelists in relation to the ideological 
background. 

242. Literature for Teachers. S. 3 hr. Study and appreciation of selected works of 
American authors, with special reference to the high-school curriculum. Given 
usuallv in the Summer Session. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 123 



243. Literature for Teachers. S. 3 In. Study and appreciation of selected works of 
English authors. Recommended for teachers of high-school English. Given 
usually in the Summer Session. 

244. Sixteenth Century Prose and Poetry. I. 3 In. Studies from Caxton to Bacon, 
from SkeltOD to Shakespeare. 

245. Seventeenth Century Prose and Poetry. II. 3 hr. Studies from Donne to Dry- 
den. 

2 17. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. I. 3 hr. Literature of the period 1700- 
1750, studied in relation to the social, political, and religious movements of 
the time. 

248. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 hr. Continuation of English 247. 
covering the latter half of the centurv. May be taken independently- of Eng- 
lish 247. 

249. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 hr. The works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, and 
Keats, together with an introduction to works of scholarship in the field of 
English Romanticism. 

250. American Romanticism. II. 3 hr. The writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 
Henry David Thoreau, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. A study of the relations of 
these men to the history of their own time, and of their contributions to 
American thought and art. 

252. English Literature, 1880-1918. 3 hr. A study of the more important writers 
and literary movements of the late Victorian and the Edwardian periods with 
emphasis on Hardy, Housman, Hopkins, Henley, Pater, Gissing, Moore, But- 
ler, and the writers of the "Aesthetic movement". 

253. Early English Drama. I. 3 hr. A study of the medieval and early Tudor 
drama, to the age of Shakespeare. 

254. Elizabethan Drama. II. 3 hr. A study of the dramas of Shakespeare's con- 
temporaries and successors to the closing of the theatres in 1642. Includes 
Kyd. Marlowe, Peele, Greene, Jonson, Heywood, Marston. Chapman. Webster, 
Beaumont and Fletcher, Massinger, Ford, and Shirley. 

255. Restoration and Eighteenth Century Drama. II. 3 hr. Comedy, tragedy, the 
heroic play, the drama of sensibility and the reaction against it: Etherege, 
Wycherley, Farquhar, Congreve, Vanbrugh, Dryden, Otway, Goldsmith, and 
Sheridan. 

256. Modern Drama. II. 3 hr. A study of world drama from Ibsen to the present 
day. 

257. Victorian Poetry. I. 3 hr. A study of the major Victorian poets— Tennyson, 
Brownings Arnold, Rossetti, Morris, Swinburne, and Fitzgerald, and a few of 
the later Victorian poets. 

258. Victorian Prose. II. 3 hr. A study of the non-fictional writings of the great 
Victorian prose critics: Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Newman, Macaulay, Huxley, 

and Morris. 

261. American Drama. I. 3 hr. \ study of representative American dramas and of 
the historj of the theatre in America. 

262. Study of Selected Authors. (American). I, II. 3 In. A study of flic works of a 
principal American author, or more than one, as announced when the course 
is scheduled. 

Study of Selected Authors (English). I. II. 3 hr. Study of the works of one or 
more o\ the principal authors, as announced in the schedule when the course 

is listed. 

124 



264. Spenser. I. 3 hr. A study of Spenser's poetry, minor poems, and The Faerie 
Queene, forms and sources, purpose of the great epic, social, political, and 
religious allegory. 

265. Byron and Shelley. II. 3 hr. Reading and study of the works of two poets of 
the later Romantic Movement, together with works of criticism and scholar- 
ship related to the period. 

267. Milton. II. 3 hr. A study of all of Milton's poems and a few selected prose 
works. 

270. American Poetry. I. 3 hr. A study of the major American poets of the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries— Bryant, Poe, Emerson, Longfellow, Whitman, 
Dickinson, Frost, Eliot. Primary emphasis on their poetry as poetry; back- 
ground materials minimized. 

272. Folk Literature. II. 3 hr. A study of the folk ballad, its origin, history, and 
literary significance, based on Child's collection and on American ballad col- 
lections. 

273. Folk Literature of the Southern Appalachian Region. II. 3 hr. A study of the 
traditional literature of the people of the southern Appalachian region, in- 
cluding songs, prose, tales, language, customs, based on material collected in 
the region, especially in West Virginia. 

275. The English Novel to the Time of Scott. I. 3 hr. A study of the English novel 
from the sixteenth century to the time of Scott, showing the development of 
the novelistic art from early narrative beginnings. 

276. The English Novel, 1832-1900. II. 3 hr. A continuation of English 275. The 
development of the English novel from the early nineteenth century to the 
beginning of the twentieth century. 

278. Tragedy. II. 3 hr. Masterpieces of tragedy from Greek times to modern, with 
consideration of the changing concepts of tragedy and of the ethical and 
ideological values reflected in the works of major tragic authors. 

280. The Modern Novel. I. 3 hr. The twentieth-century novel, with emphasis upon 
the works of selected British novelists. 

282. Modern British Poetry. I. 3 hr. A survey of British poetry from 1890 to the 
present, including the Decadents, Counter-Decadents, Hopkins, Housman, 
Hardy, the Georgians, the Imagists, and war poets; Yeats, Eliot, the Auden 
Group, and the post- World War II poets. 

291. Introduction to Literary Research. I, II. 3 hr. Bibliography; materials and 
tools of literary investigations; methods of research in various fields of literary 
history and interpretation; problems of editing. Practical guidance in the writ- 
ing of theses. 



FAMILY RESOURCES (formerly Home Economics) 

The Division of Family Resources provides a program for women and men 
interested in obtaining undergraduate professional preparation in the broad field of 
home economics. The structure of the courses in the Divison provides students the 
opportunity to study the environment of man, particularly his food, clothing, and 
shelter, and the relationship of man to that environment. The focus of the program 
is upon human interaction and its consequences within the framework of the social 
institution of the family. 

Students enroll in the Division who are interested in the numerous career 
opportunities in any of these areas: 

—child development, nursery education, early childhood education, family 
life education, child welfare, family service occupations, and other community serv- 
ice oriented fields. 

FAMILY RESOURCES 125 



— management and effective use of family financial and human resources; for 
example, as consumer education counselors. 

—design and use oi dwellings, interior design, and design and use of products, 
1 in nisi lings and equipment for the home. 

—the textile and fiber industry, fashion, and fashion merchandising. 

—food production, processing, planning and service, particularly in the ad- 
ministration and organization of high volume food services. 

—human nutrition, nutrition education, and dietetics. 

—journalism, particularly in the areas of food, fashion and home service. 

—teaching in elementary, junior high school or secondary programs in family 
life education, foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles and consumer education. 

—large industrial organizations whose major products are food, household 
equipment or educational information and service directed toward the consumer. 

Students who prepare for these career opportunities by enrolling in the 
Division of Family Resources may work with children, adolescents, adults or total 
family units; in schools, small businesses or large corporations, public utility com- 
panies and various government organizations; in their own community, in any part 
of the United States, or in a foreign country. The demand has never been greater for 
the kind of professional services that the home economist has to offer. 

The program of the Division provides not only for lectures, but also for a 
variety of kinds of laboratory experiences and selected field work in different set- 
tings. 

The need to educate competent and informed citizens and family members 
has never been more urgent than it presently is. In addition to the professional 
preparation of students, the program of the Division regularly attracts a large num- 
ber of students from various departments in the University who enroll in courses for 
the purpose of increasing the scope of their knowledge in family relations and child 
development, foods and nutrition, textiles and clothing, housing and design and 
family economics and management. The field of home economics has the longest 
tradition of any field for interest in the education of competent and informed con- 
sumers and family members. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

Students have the choice of seven options toward a degree in home economics: 
social science emphasis, physical science emphasis, art emphasis, journalism em- 
phasis, dietetics emphasis, home economics education, or general emphasis. The de- 
gree granted is a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in home economics. 

Minimum hours in Family Resources 36 

Total hours in other areas 80 

Electives 12 

Grand Total 128 

Required Courses 

I. University Core Hrs. 

English Composition 6 

Physical Education 4 

Core Groups A, B and C 36 



Total 46 



126 



II. Family Resources Professional Core 

1. Child Development and Family Relations 144 3 

2. Textiles and Clothing 22 or 122 3 

3. Nutrition 71 or Nutrition 175 3 

4. Home Management and Family Economics 161 or Home 
Management and Family Economics 165 3 

5. Housing and Design 31 3 

Total 15 

III. Options 

a. Social Science Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in social science areas 12 

2. Additional courses in child development and family 
relations, home management and family economics 
areas 14 

3. Electives 41 

Total 67 

b. Physical Science Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in physical sciences, work in at 
least two fields 12 

a. Biology, bacteriology, zoology, genetics 

b. Chemistry 

c. Mathematics, statistics, physics 

2. Additional courses in foods and nutrition 15 

3. Speech 3 

4. Electives 37 

Total 67 

c. Art Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in at least two of the following 
areas: 21 

a. Accounting, marketing, journalism 

b. Art 

c. Psychology, sociology, history 

2. Additional courses in textiles and clothing, housing and 
design areas 15 

3. Speech 3 

4. Electives 28 

Total 67 

d. Journalism Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in Family Resources 15 

2. Journalism courses 21 

3. Additional courses from University Core B 6 

4. Family Resources electives 6 

5. General electives 19 

Total 67 

e. Dietetics Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in physical sciences 16 

2. Additional courses in foods and institution 
administration and nutrition 29 

3. Accounting 51, Psychology 101, Speech 3 and 
Education 106 12 

4. Electives 10 

Total 67 

FAMILY RESOURCES 127 



f. Homo Economics Education (Teaching Emphasis)— Those 

students wishing to obtain a teaching certificate in 
vocational heme economics must take certain specified 
courses under the University Core Program and must 
havt at least 8 hours in each of the five subject matter 
.in a- in the Division. (Consult the Division of Edu- 
cation section for specific details. ) 

g. Genera] Emphasis 

1. One additional 3 hour course in each area plus 6 
hours of electives in home economics 21 

2. Electives 46 



Total 67 



Laboratory Fees 



A nonrefundable fee is required of all students who take the following lab- 
oratory courses in Family Resources: 

Course Per Semester 

Foods and Institution Administration 55 $ 5.00 

Foods and Institution Administration 151 10.00 

Foods and Institution Administration 255 5.00 

Home Management and Family Economics 160 5.00 

Home Management and Family Economics 165 5.00 



Home Economics Education 
HEED 

211. Evaluation in Home Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: 30 hr. of Home Economics, 7 hr. 
of Education or consent. Experience in devising, selecting, and using a variety 
of techniques for evaluating progress toward cognitive, affective, and psycho- 
motor objectives in home economics. Offered alternate odd years. 

212. Adult Education in Home Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: 30 hr. of Home Economics 
and 7 hr. of Education or consent. A study of adult education as that part of 
the local home economics program which contributes to meeting needs of 
people for continuing education throughout the various life stages. Attention 
given to organization of classes and to selection of content, methods, and 
materials. Offered alternate even years. 



Textiles and Clothing 
TC 

22. Principles of Clothing Construction. I, II. 3 hr. (Three 2-hr. periods per week). 
Basic principles of clothing construction including pattern alteration and fit- 
ting. 

27. Textiles for Consumers. I. II. 3 hr. Presents a survey of traditional background 
information and the new developments in the textile field. Special emphasis is 
given to the development of raw materials into finished consumers' goods. 

L21. Tailoring. I, II. 3 hr. PR: TC 22, 27. Tailoring of suits and coats. Emphasis 
placed on professional techniques, advanced fitting and construction of gar- 
ments. Second garmenl constructed by fast method techniques. 

122. Clothing for the Family. I. 3 hr. Clothing lor the family in relation to social, 
psychological, and economic fatcors including a study of the clothing industry, 
trends, and cultural significance. Field trip included. 

128 



123. Costume Design. II. 3 hr. PR: TC 22, 27. Techniques of figure and fashion 
drawing. Designing for individuals of various types and ages. Some history of 
costume included. 

124. Advanced Clothing Construction. I. 3 hr. PR: TC 123 or consent. Offers 
opportunity for creative expression and for understanding of pattern design 
through handling of fabrics on dress form. Costumes are designed, draped 
and constructed. 

127. Advanced Textiles. I. 3 hr. PR: TC 27. Comparative characteristics of all 
textile fibers are presented. Physical and chemical properties are explained 
with reference to fiber morphology and/or manufacturing processes. Textile 
fiber products legislation is reviewed. 

Housing and Design 
HD 

31. Introduction to Design. I, II. 3 hr. The use of the design elements and the 
application of design principles to stimulate imagination and creative ability 
and to develop discriminating judgment in selection and arrangement of 
materials used for the individual and the home. 

33. Housing Design. I, II. 3 hr. PR: HD 31 or consent. Housing and home plan- 
ning as they relate to family living. Selection, arrangement, and use of the 
interior and exterior space for activities carried on, in, and around the home. 

133. Interior Design I. I. 3 hr. PR: HD 33 or consent. The aesthetic and practical 
aspects of coordinating the furnishings, background, accessories, lighting, and 
space of a house for family living. 

233. Interior Design II. II. 3 hr. PR: HD 33, 133 or consent. Technical and de- 
sign information necessary to comprehend and function within the contempo- 
rary home furnishings market. 

Child Development; Family Relations 
CDFR 

141. Child Development I. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 or Educ. 105 or consent. An 
introduction to major theories of human development. Contributions of Freud, 
Rank, Erikson, Piaget, Sears, etc. will be studied. Laboratory experience as 
observation in laboratory child development center. 

142. Child Development II. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or Ed. 105 or consent. (2 lee. 
and 1 2-hr. lab. arranged.) Principles of development during childhood in- 
cluding physical, psychological, and social factors affecting behavior. Obser- 
vation and participation in the University Nursery School. 

144. Introduction to Marriage and the Family. I, II. 3 hr. Introductory course in 
the study of marriage and the family. Attention is placed particularly on mate 
selection, the interplay of social roles in family relations, and problems of 
decision-making and adjustment arising out of the demands of the contempo- 
rary social setting. 

145. Infant Development. I. 3 hr. Developmental characteristics and issues during 
the prenatal period and the first eighteen months with implications for guid- 
ance and care. 

146. Adolescent Development. I, II. 3 hr. An investigation of the adolescent in 
contemporary American culture, including normative physical, social, and 
personality development; and relationships within various typical social set- 
tings (e.g., family, school, community, peer group). 

241. Cognitive Development of the Child. I. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 141 and 142 or con- 
sent. A normative survey of logical thought development from infancy to 

FAMILY RESOURCES 129 



adolescence. Emphasis is directed toward the growth of spatio-temporal, 
quantity-numerical, spatial-geometric, and infralogical concepts and their re- 
lationship to basic sensory-perceptual functioning during the 2 year to 12 year 
old age interval. 

242. Socio-Emotional Development of the Child. II. 3 hr. A study and examination 
oi contemporary theory and research into various facets of the socialization 
process and the development of attitudes in the child. 

244. Family and Individual in Community. I. 3 hr. PR: One course in the family, 
or sociology, or consent. Social psychological analysis of the individual in the 
family and in other social systems. Involves the study of role relationships, 
community processes and attitudes and values as they affect the behavior of 
the individual. 

245. Family Development. I, II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 144 or consent. A course de- 
signed to increase knowledge and understanding of comparative family pat- 
terns through the use of cross-cultural and historical materials. Intensive study 
of family development in contemporary United States with special attention 
to social class differences and the use of the life cycle and developmental 
task concepts as analytic tools. 

247. Comparative Study of the Family. II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 144 or consent. The 
comparative method as a framework for family analysis. The family as both an 
independent and dependent variable in social change in relation to other 
social systems. Modal and unique patterns of structure and functioning. Al- 
ternative methods for achieving similar cultural objectives. Converging pat- 
terns in the contemporary world setting. 

248. Theories of Child Development. II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 141, 142 or consent. An 
examination of the major theoretical conceptions of child development. The 
work of Werner, Piaget, Lewin, Freud, and the American learning theorists 
will be covered. 



Foods; Institution Administration 
FIA 

55. Food Principles and Practices. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 8 hr. of a laboratory science. 
(2 lee, 1 lab.). Basic principles of food selection, care and preparation. Em- 
phasis is placed on the chemical and physical properties of foods and re- 
actions which occur during processing. 

151. Meal Management. I, II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 55 or consent. (1 lee, 3-hr. lab.). 
Selection and purchase of foods; planning, preparing, and serving meals with 
emphasis on time, energy, and money management. 

153. Quantity Cookery. II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 151. (1 lee, two 3-hr. labs, arranged). 
Application of principles to preparation of food in large quantities. Use of 
standardized formulae, calculation of costs, and use of institution equipment. 
Field trip included. Offered alternate odd years. 

154. Institution Food Procurement. I. 3 hr. PR: FIA 153. Producing areas, distri- 
bution of food products, specifications, storage, and food practices in quantity 
buying. Observation in local wholesale markets, warehouses, and storage 
units. Tour of market facilities in Pittsburgh area required. Offered in alternate 
odd years. 

L58. Institution Organization and Management. II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 153. Principles 
of organization and management of food service. Field trip included. Offered 
alternate even years. 

5 Experimental Foods. II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 55, Chem. 131, or consent. (1 hr. lee, 
two 2-hr. labs.). The study and experimentation with factors involved in food 
processing under various conditions. Offered alternate odd years. 

130 



258. Laboratory Practice in Institution Management. I, II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 158 and 
consent. Experience under supervision in planning, preparing and serving 
food in an institution. Selection of place and type of experience to be deter- 
mined by needs of students. 

Home Management; Family Economics 
HMFE 

160. Communication of Consumer Information. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Minimum of 3 hr. 
in each of four areas of home economics, or consent. Techniques of com- 
municating ideas and information relative to goods and services available to 
the consumer. Emphasis upon demonstration techniques. 

161. Family Economics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing. Management of the 
family's money resources. Consideration of the economic problems of families, 
of planned spending and saving, and of the role of the consumer. 

165. Home Management; Principles and Applications. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Upper- 
division standing. Study and application of management in a variety of situa- 
tions faced by the family with opportunity to integrate knowledge from other 
courses. 

166. Home Management; Residence Laboratory. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: HMFE 165. 
Residence laboratory in home management principles and practices. 

167. Household Equipment. I, II. 3 hr. Selection, arrangement, use and care of 
equipment for various situations and for different income levels. Lecture, 
laboratory, and discussion. 

261. Consumer Economics. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51, HMFE 161, or consent. Course 
designed to help students understand the role of consumer in our economy. 
Involves the study of research methods and techniques being used to identify, 
understand, and solve consumer problems. 

Nutrition 
NTR 

71. Introduction to Nutrition. I, II. 3 hr. Essentials of adequate diet; applications 
are made with particular reference to needs of college students. 

175. Food and People. I. 3 hr. The cultural, social, ethnic, and economic problems 
involved in feeding families. 

271. Human Nutrition. I. 3 hr. PR: NTR 71, biochemistry, physiology. The role of 
food nutrients in the physiological and biochemical processes of the body; 
nutritional needs of healthy individuals under ordinary conditions and in 
periods of physiologic stress. Offered alternate even years. 

273. Family and Community Nutrition. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Special emphasis is 
given to nutritional status of the individual and family in the community. 
Students study nutritional problems and work toward their solutions through 
fieldwork. 

274. Diet Therapy. II. 3 hr. PR: NTR 271, Zool. 271. Adaptations of normal diet 
for diseases whose prevention or treatment is largely influenced by diet. 
Offered in alternate odd years. 

Family Resources 
FR 

281. Seminar in Home Economics Education. I, II, S. 1-4 hr., max., 9 hr. PR: Senior 
standing and consent. A review and discussion of home economics education 
at secondary, college, and adult levels. Emphasis on current research and 
trends in selected areas. 

FAMILY RESOURCES 131 



282. Seminar in Clothing or Textiles. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination oi significant contemporary issues in the area of clothing or tex- 
tiles. 

283. Seminar in Housing or Design. I, 11, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination of significant contemporary issues in the area of housing or de- 
sign. 

284. Seminar in Child Development. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination of significant contemporary issues in the area of child develop- 
ment. 

285. Seminar in Foods and/or Institution Administration. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., 
max., 9 hr. Critical examination of significant contemporary issues in the area 
of foods and/or institution administration. 

286. Seminar in Home Management or Family Economics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per 
sem., max., 9 hr. Critical examination of significant contemporary issues in 
the area of home management or family economics. 

287. Seminar in Nutrition. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical examina- 
tion of significant contemporary issues in the area of nutrition. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers work in foreign languages, liter- 
atures, cultures, and in linguistics. Areas included are French, Spanish, Italian, Ger- 
man, Russian, Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Linguistics, Language Teaching Methods, and 
Bibliography and Research. A student may be a candidate for an A.B. degree, with 
a major or minor in French, Spanish, German, Russian, or Latin, or with a minor in 
Greek. Students whose grades have frequently fallen below "B" in language work in 
the lower division should not select a foreign language as a major or minor. At least 
36 hours of work in a given language constitutes a major and 12 hours of upper- 
division work a minor. All foreign language majors must take Linguistics 111. In 
most cases the department recommends that students who major in a foreign lan- 
guage should minor in a second. This is not a requirement, however, and other fields 
may be selected with the approval of the department chairman. During the second 
semester of the senior year each major will be required to take a comprehensive 
examination testing his control of the major language. Students who wish to earn pro- 
fessional certificates as elementary or secondary foreign language teachers are ad- 
vised to consult the College of Human Resources and Education section of this bul- 
letin. Students who have completed two or more years of study of a foreign language 
in high school can receive no credit towards a degree in the College of Arts and 
Sciences lor either semester of the elementary work in that language. 



MAJOR IN FRENCH 

Requirements'. French 1 and 2 or equiv., French 3 and 4, 103 and 104, 109, 
110, 115, 116, 118, and 231. 

Suggested Program: 

First Year Second Year 

Second Sem. Hr. 
French 104 3 

Minor Subject 3-6 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
I'l.vs. Ed. 1 



15-19 15-19 15-19 15-19 

132 



hirst Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


French 3° 3 


French 4° 3 


French 103 3 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


Minor Subject 3-6 


1 liimanities 1 3 


1 lumanities 2 3 


Linguistics 111 3 


Electives, Groups 


Electives, Groups 


Electives, Groups 


\ B, or c: 3-9 


\ B, or C 3-9 


A, B, or G 3-6 


Phys. Ed. 1 


I'l.vs. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. 1 





Third 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


French 109 


3 


French 110 


3 


French 115 


3 


French 116 


3 


Minor subject 




Minor subject 




and electives 


12 


and electives 


12 



Fourth Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

French 118 3 

Minor subject 
and electives 15 



Second Sem. llr. 
French 231 3 

Minor subject 
and electives 15 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 



*If a student has not had French in high school, he will normally take French 1 and 2 in 
his first year and will take French 3 and 4 concurrently with French 103 and 104 in his second 
year. 



MAJOR IN SPANISH 

Requirements: Spanish 1 and 2 or equiv., Spanish 3 and 4, 103 and 104, 109 
110, and 12 hr. of literature courses from the following: Spanish 211, 212, 217, 218, 
221, and 222. 



Suggested Program; 



First 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Spanish 3° 3 


Spanish 4° 3 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


Humanities 1 3 


Humanities 2 3 


Electives, Groups 


Electives, Groups 


A, B, or C 3-9 


A, B, or C 3-9 


Phys. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. 1 



First Sem. 
Spanish 103 3 

Minor subject 3-6 
Linguistics 111 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 



Second Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Spanish 104 3 

Minor subject 3-6 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 

Phys. Ed. 1 



15-19 



15-19 



15-19 



15-19 



Third Year 



Fourth Year 



First Sem. 
Spanish 109 
Spanish 211 

or 217 
Minor subject 

and electives 



Hr. 

3 



12 



Second Sem. 
Spanish 110 
Spanish 212 

or 218 
Minor subject 

and electives 



Hr. 

3 



12 



First Sem. 
Spanish 221 
Minor subject 
and electives 



Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 
3 Spanish 222 3 

Minor subject 
15 and electives 15 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 



°If a student has not had Spanish in high school, he will normally take Spanish 1 and 2 in 
his first year and will take Spanish 3 and 4 concurrently with Spanish 103 and 104 in his second 
year. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



133 



MAJOR IX GERMAX 

Requin merits: German 1 and 2 or equiv., German 3 and 4, 103 and 104, 109, 
110, and at least 12 hr. of additional upper-division courses in German literature or 
Germanic linguistics. (See Linguistics 211, 212, 251, 252, 271, 272, 281, and 282.) 



Suggested Program: 
First Year 






Second 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 
German 3° 3 
English 1 3 

Humanities 1 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 


Second Sem. Hr. 
German 4° 3 
English 2 3 
Humanities 2 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 


First Sun. Hr. 
German 103 3 
Minor subject 0-3 
Linguistics 111 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 0-6 
Phys Ed. 1 


Second Sem. Hr. 
German 104 3 
Minor subject 0-3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 


15-19 


: 


L5-19 




15-19 


15-19 




Third Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 
German 109 3 
German elective 3 
Minor subject 6 
Electives 3-6 


Second Sem. Hr. 
German 110 3 
German elective 3 
Minor subject 6 
Electives 3-6 


First Sem. 

German 

Electives 


Hr. 

6 

9-12 


Second Sem. Hr. 
German 3 
Electives 12-18 



15-18 



15-18 



15-18 



15-18 



°If a student has not had German in high school, he will normally take German 1 and 2 
in his first year and will take German 3 and 4 concurrently with German 103 and 104 in his 
second year. 



MAJOR IX RUSSIAX 

Requirements: Russian 1 and 2 or equiv., Russian 3 and 4, 103 and 104, 109, 
110, and at least 12 hr. of additional upper-division courses in Russian literature or 
Russian linguistics (see Linguistics 231). 



Suggested Program: 



First Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

Russian 3° 3 

English 1 3 

Humanities 1 3 

Electives, Groups 
A, B, or C 3-9 



Phys. Ed. 



Second Sem. 
Russian 4* 
English 2 
Humanities 2 



Hr. 
3 
3 
3 



Electives, Groups 
A, B, or C 3-9 



1 Phvs. Ed. 



Second Year 



First Sem. Hr 

Russian 103 3 

Minor subject 3-6 
I Inguistics 111 3 
Electives, Groups 
A, B, or G 3-9 



1 Phys. Ed. 



Second Sem. Hr. 
Russian 104 3 

Minor subject 3-6 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or G 3-9 
Pins. Ed. 1 



First Sent. 

Russian 109 3 

Russian elective 3 

Minor subject o' 

Electives 3-6 

15-18 



15-19 

Third Year 

Hr. Second Sem 



15-19 



Hr. 

Russian 110 

Russian elective 3 
Minor subject 6 

Electives 3-6 

L5-18 



First Sem. 

Russian 

Electives 



15-19 15-19 

Fourth Year 
Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 
6 Russian 3 

9-12 Electives 12-15 



15-18 15-18 



°Ii ,i itudenl lias not had Russian in high school, he wfl] normally take Russian 1 and 2 in 
Ins fust yeat and will tako Russian 3 and 4 concurrently with Russian 103 and 104 in his 
ie< "ml year. 

134 



MAJOR IN LATIN 

Requirements: Latin 1 and 2 or equiv., Latin 3 and 4, 109, 110, 121, 122, and 
enough upper-division courses in Latin literature or Latin linguistics to bring the 
total college hours to 36. 

Suggested Program: 
First Year 
First Sem. Hr. Second Sem 

Latin 3 3 

English 1 3 

Humanities 1 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 



Hr. 

Latin 4 3 

English 2 3 

Humanities 2 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 
Phys. Ed. 1 



First Sem. 

Latin elective 3 

Latin 109 3 

Minor subject 0-3 

Linguistics 111 3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 0-6 

Phys. Ed. 1 



Second Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Latin elective 3 

Latin 110 3 

Minor subject 0-3 
Electives, Groups 

A, B, or C 3-9 

Phys. Ed. 1 



15-19 
Third Year 



15-19 



First Sem. 
Latin 121 
Latin elective 
Minor subject 
Electives 



Hr. 
3 
3 
6 

3-6 

15-18 



Second Sem. 
Latin 122 
Latin elective 
Minor subject 
Electives 



Hr. 
3 

3 

6 

3-6 

15-18 



First Sem. 

Latin 

Electives 



15-19 

Fourth Year 

Hr. Second Sem. 



6 
9-12 



15-18 



Latin 
Electives 



15-19 



Hr. 

3 

12-15 



15-18 



Courses of Instruction in French 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary French. I, II. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary French. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of French 1. 

3. Intermediate French. I, II. 3 hr. Reading of modern French prose. 

4. Intermediate French. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of French 3. 



Upper Division 

Elementary Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: French 3 and 4, or consent. 
Elementary Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: French 103 or consent. 
Grammar and Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French, or equiv. 
Advanced Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: French 109, or equiv. 

115. The Classical School. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French, or equiv. 

116. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French, or equiv. 
118. Literature of the Nineteenth Century. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French, or equiv. 

Refresher Course in Conversational French. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

Fundamentals for Reading French. I. 3 hr. Undergraduate credit only. Gradu- 
ate students must register as auditors. PR: Graduate status or upper-division 
status. The sequence 205-206 is intended for graduate students from other 
departments to teach them to read general and technical French. 

206. Reading French. II. 3 hr. Undergraduate credit only. Graduate students must 
register as auditors. PR: 12 hr. of French or equiv. or French 205. Graduate 
students may meet the doctoral foreign language requirement by achieving a 
grade of B or better in this course. Not open to Department of Foreign 
Languages majors. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 135 



103 
104 
109 
110 



203 
205 



217. French Civilization. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French. 

221. The Romantic Movement. I. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

222. French Realism. II. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

22(i. Literary Criticism. II. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

227. Graduate Reading in French. No credit. A special course to help students 
prepare for the Ph.D. reading examination in French. 

22 l J. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. I. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

231. Phonetics and Pronunciation. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of French, or equiv. 

237. Moliere. II. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

241. French Structural Linguistics. 4 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French. Special course for 
the NDEA Language Institute. 

242. Methods in French Secondary Teaching. 4 hr. PR: 12 hr. of French. Special 
course for the NDEA Language Institute. 

244. Explication de Textes. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of French, or equiv. 

271. Modern iNovel to 1930. I. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

272. The Novel After 1930. II. 3 hr. PR: A.B. in French, or consent. 

292. Pro-Seminar in French Literature. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable credit 
courses normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emergencies 
and must be approved by the department chairman and the professor teaching 
the course. 



Courses of Instruction in Spanish 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Spanish. I, II. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Spanish. I, II. 3 hr. Continuation of Spanish 1. 

3. Intermediate Spanish. I. 3 hr. Reading of modern Spanish prose. 

4. Intermediate Spanish. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Spanish 3. 
Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 3 and 4, or consent. 

104. Elementary Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 103, or consent. 

109. Grammar and Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

110. Advanced Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 109, or equiv. 

211. Nineteenth Century Literature to 1870. I. 3 hr. PR: Spanish 3 and 4, and 
consent. 

212. Spanish Literature Since 1870. II. 3 hr PR: Spanish 3 and 4. and eonsent. 
215. Lyric Poetry. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

210. Spanish Civilization and Culture. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

217. Spanish-American Literature and Culture. I. 3 hi. PR: 18 hr. of Spanish, or 
equiv. 

218. Spanish-American Literature and Culture. II. 3 lir. PR: 18 In. of Spanish, or 

equiv. Continuation <>l Spanish 217. 

221. Literature of the Golden Age to 1035. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

The Golden Age After Lope He Vega. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of Spanish or 
equiv. 

223. Estudios de Estilo. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 
136 



224. Explicacion de Textos. II. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

225. The Picaresque Novel. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish, or equiv. 

227. Graduate Reading in Spanish. No credit. Special course to help students pre- 
pare for the Ph.D. reading examination in Spanish. 

241. Spanish Structural Linguistics. 4 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish. Special course for 
NDEA Language Institute. 

242. Methods in Spanish Secondary Teaching. 4 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Spanish. Special 
course for tlue NDEA Language Institute. 

291. Cervantes. II. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of Spanish, or consent. 

292. Pro-Seminar in Spanish Literature. 1-6 hr. Special topics. 

295. Sixteenth Century Literature. I. 3 hr. 

297. Pro-Seminar in Spanish-American Studies. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable 
credit courses normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emer- 
gencies and must be approved by the department chairman and the professor 
teaching the course. 

Courses of Instruction in Italian 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Italian. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Italian. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Italian 1. 

3. Intermediate Italian. I. 3 hr. Reading of modern Italian prose. 

4. Intermediate Italian. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Italian 3. 

Courses of Instruction in German 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary German. I, II. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary German. I, II. 3 hr. 

3. Intermediate German. I, II. 3 hr. Reading of modern German prose. 

4. Intermediate German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 3. 
Upper Division 

103. Spoken German. I. 3 hr. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. 

104. Spoken German. II. 3 hr. PR: German 103, or consent. 

105. The German Novelle. I. 3 hr. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. Representa- 
tive stories of Keller, Meyer, Storm, and Stifter. 

106. The German Novelle. II. 3 hr PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. From Natural- 
ism to present day. Continuation of German 105. 

107. Nineteenth Cen'.ury Drama. I. 3 hr. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. Critical 
study of selected dramas by Kleist, Grillparzer, Hebbel, and Ludwig. 

108. Nineteenth Century Drama. II. 3 hr. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. Con- 
tinuation of German 107. 

109. Advanced Grammar and Composition. I. 3 hr. PR: German 103 and 104, or 
consent. Intensive review of German grammar with extensive practice in Ger- 
man composition and translation into German. 

110. Advanced Composition and Conversation. II. 3 hr. PR: German 109, or con- 
sent. Additional practice in composition, with all explanations and discussions 
conducted in German. 

121. Scientific German. I. 3 hr. PR: German 1 and 2. Primarily for students in 
science courses. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 137 



122. Scientific German. II. 3 hi. Continuation of German 121. 

136. Introduction to Goethe. II. 3 hi. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. 

161. Lyric Poetry. 1. 3 hr. PR: German 3 and 4, or consent. 

163. Modern German Prose in English Translation. I. 3 hr. Reading and discussion 
of outstanding German short stories and a few novels. (Xo credit allowed for 
departmental major nor for regular language requirements). 

201. Independent Reading. I. 3 hr. Supervised reading lor students who wish to 
do intensive work in any field of interest. 

202. Independent Reading. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 201. 

227. Graduate Reading in German. No credit. Special course to help students pre- 
pare for the Ph.D. reading examination in German. 

242. Faust. II. 3 hr. Critical study of Goethe's Faust. 

243. Medieval German Literature. I. 3 hr. PR: German 4, or consent. 

244. German Literature of the Restoration and Renaissance. II. 3 hr. PR: German 
4, or consent. 

245. Classicism and Romanticism. I. 3 hr. PR: German 4, or consent. Critical study 
of German literature from 1750 to 1830. 

246. The Liberal Age. II. 3 hr. PR: German 4, or consent. Critical study of Ger- 
man literature from 1830 to 1880, with an emphasis upon Poetic Realism. 

247. The Age of Crisis. I. 3 hr. PR: German 4, or consent. Critical study of Ger- 
man literature from 1880 to the present. 

265. German Civilization. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of German, or consent. General com- 
prehensive survey of the most important aspects of German culture, including 
a brief historical background, the development of the German language, 
geography, science, music, art, architecture, literature, and philosophy. 

275. The Modern Novel. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of German. Supervised reading of 
nineteenth century novels. 

276. The Modern Novel. II. 3 hr. Continuation of German 275, with emphasis on 
recent fiction. 

292. Pro-Seminar in German Literature. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable credit 
courses normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emergencies 
and must be approved by the department chairman and the professor teaching 
the course. 



Courses of Instruction in Russian 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Russian. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Russian. II. 3 hr. 

3. Intermediate Russian. I. 3 hr. Reading of modern Russian prose. 

4. Intermediate Russian. II. 3 hi. Continuation of Russian 3. 

Upper Division 

103. Elementary Conversation. II. 3 hi. PR; Russian 3 and 4, or consent. 

104. Elementary Conversation. I. 3 hr. PR: Russian 103, or consent. 

105. The Russian Short Story. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Russian, or equiv. 

L06. The Russian Short Story. II. 3 hi. PR: 12 hr. of Russian, or equiv. Continua- 



tion ol Russian 105. 



138 



109. Advanced Grammar and Composition. I. 3 hr. PR: Russian 103 and 104, or 
consent. Intensive review of Russian grammar with extensive practice in Rus- 
sian composition and translation into Russian. 

121. Scientific Russian. I. 3 hr. PR: Russian 1 and 2, or equiv. Primarily for stu- 
dents in science courses. 

122. Scientific Russian. II. 3 hr. PR: Russian 121 or consent. Continuation of Rus- 
sian 121. 

144. Survey of Russian Literature. I. 3 hr. PR: Russian 3 and 4, or consent. 

145. Survey of Russian Literature. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Russian 144. 

211. The Russian Novel. I. 3 hr. PR: Russian 3 and 4, or consent. 

212. The Russian Novel. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Russian 211. 



Courses of Instruction in Latin 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Latin. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Latin. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Latin 1. 

3. Intermediate Latin. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 1 and 2. or two years of high-school 
Latin. Selections from Caesar, Aulus, Gellius, and Nepos, and from other 
authors of comparable difficulty, designed to prepare students to read orations 
of Cicero. 

4. Cicero's Orations. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3, or two years of high-school Latin. 

Upper Division 

109. Selections from Roman Prose. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3 and 4, or equiv. 

110. Selections from Roman Poetry. II. 3 hr. PR Latin 4 and 109, or equiv. 

113. Roman Biographers. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3 or 4 or consent. Selections from the 
Famous Men of Cornelius Nepos, and from the Silver Age biographers. 

114. Roman Elegy. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 3 or 4 or consent. Selections from Ovid. 

121. Survey of Latin Literature. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109 and 110, or consent. 

122. Survey of Latin Literature. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109 and 110, or consent. 

131. Latin Prose Composition. II. PR: Latin 3 or 4 or consent. Advanced grammar 
and composition. 

192. Special Topics. PR: Latin 4 or consent. Selected writings and special prob- 
lems in Latin Literature. 

201. Roman Novelists. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. The origin of the 
novel is traced from Homer to the Medieval Greek and Latin romance 
writers. Readings include selections from Petronius, the Cena Trimalchionis, 
and from Apuleius, Cupid and Psyche. 

202. Roman Comedy. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. A brief history of the 
origin and development of Greek and Roman comedy. Readings include the 
Menaechmi of Plautus, and the Andria of Terence. 

231. Roman Satire. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. Greek satirical writings 
and the origin of the Roman satire. Readings include selections from the 
Satires of Horace, and from the Satires of Persius and Juvenal. 

234. Roman Historians. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. The origin and de- 
velopment of Roman historiography and its Greek antecedents. Readings in- 
clude selections from Livy's History, from Tacitus' Agricola, and from Sue- 
tonius' Augustus. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 139 



235. Roman Epic. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. The origin and develop- 
ment of the Greek and Roman epic. Readings include selections from Vergil's 
Aeneid, from Lucretius' De Rerum Natura, and from the earlier and later 
epic poets. 

236. Roman Philosophers. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. The origin and 
development of Greek philosophy and its influence upon Roman philosophy. 
Readings include selections from Cicero's Tusculan Disputations on the im- 
mortality of the soul and from Seneca's Epistles. 

237. Roman Lyric Poetry. I. 3 hr. PR: Latin 109, 110, or equiv. Origin and de- 
velopment of the Greek and Roman lyric poetry. Readings include selections 
from Horace, Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius. 

292. Pro-Seminar in Latin Literature. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable credit courses 
normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emergencies and must 
be approved by the department chairman and the professor teaching the 



Courses of Instruction in Greek 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Greek. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Greek. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Greek 1. 

3. Intermediate Greek. I. 3 hr. 

4. Intermediate Greek. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Greek 3. 

Upper Division 

109. Selections from Medieval and Modern Greek Literature. I. 3 hr. 

110. Selections from the Attic Orators. II. 3 hr. 

111. New Testament Greek. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Selections from the Septuagint, 
the Greek New Testament, and the early Church Fathers. 

121. Survey of Greek Literature. I. 3 hr. PR: Greek 109, 110, or consent. 

122. Survey of Greek Literature. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Greek 121. 

292. Pro-Seminar in Greek Literature. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable credit courses 
normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emergencies and 
must be approved by the department chairman and the professor teaching the 
course. 

Courses of Instruction in Hebrew 

Lower Division 

1. Elementary Hebrew. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Hebrew. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hebrew 1. 

3. Intermediate Hebrew. I. 3 hi. Reading of Hebrew prose. 

4. Intermediate Hebrew. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Hebrew 3. 

Courses of Instruction in Swahili 
Lower Division 

1. Elementary Swahili. I. 3 hr. 

2. Elementary Swahili. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Swahili 1. 

3. Intermediate Swahili. I. 3 hr. Heading of Swahili prose. 

J. Intermediate Swahili. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Swahili 3. 
140 



Courses of Instruction in Linguistics 

Upper Division 

111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics. I. 3 hr. Required for foreign language 
majors. 

201. Linguistics As Applied to Spanish-American Dialects. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

211. Middle High German. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of German from upper division. 
Study of the linguistic developments of Middle High German from the elev- 
enth to the fifteenth centuries with illustrative readings from the Nibelunge- 
lied. 

212. Middle High German. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Linguistics 211 with illustra- 
tive readings from the Middle High German lyric poets and the courtly epics. 

225. Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

226. Italic Dialects. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

227. Vulgar Latin. II. 3 hr. PR: Latin 12, 22, or equiv. Selections from Latin in- 
scriptions and later Latin literature are studied to illustrate the development 
of the Latin language from its earliest time to its passing into the Romance 
languages. 

231. The Structure of Modern Russian. I. 3 hr. PR: 12 hr. of Russian, or consent. 

241. See French 241 and Spanish 241. 

251. History of the German Language. I. 3 hr. PR: 18 hr. of German, or consent. 
Historical development of standard German with emphasis on its relationships 
to the other German languages and dialects. 

252. Comparative Germanic Linguistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Linguistics 251, or consent. A 
comparative study of Gothic, Old English, Old Norse, Old High German and 
Old Saxon. 

255. History of the Spanish Language. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. The development of 
Spanish and the transformation of the Castilian dialect into the national lan- 
guage of Spain. The course, given in Spanish, will include the cultural factors 
as well as a study of historical phonology, morphology, and syntax. 

271. Old English. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Elementary study of Old West Saxon with 
illustrative materials from prose and poetry. 

272. Old English. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Linguistics 271. Comparison of the 
Old English dialects, with extensive illustrative readings, especially in Beo- 
wulf. 

281. Old Norse. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Elementary study of Old West Xorse prose. 

282. Old Norse. II. 3 hr. Continuation of Linguistics 281. Readings in various Old 
Icelandic sagas; introduction to Old Norse poetry. 

290. Old French. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

292. Pro-Seminar in Linguistics. 1-6 hr. Special topics. Variable credit courses 
normally carry 3 hr. credit. Exceptions are made only in emergencies and 
must be approved by the department chairman and the professor teaching the 
course. 

296. Old Spanish. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

Courses of Instruction in Language Teaching Methods 

Upper Division 

221. The Teaching of Foreign Languages. I. 3 hr. Required of all graduate stu- 
dents who are prospective foreign language teachers. 

222. Language Laboratory Techniques. II. 3 hr. Required of all candidates for a 
graduate degree in a foreign language. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 141 



212. See French 242 and Spanish 242. 

270 Problems in the Teaching of French in the Elementary School. I. 3 hr. PR: 

Consent. 

Courses of Instruction in Bibliography and Research 

Upper Division 
265. Methods of Research. I. 3 hr. For students of French, German, or Spanish. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Laboratory Fees 

A nonrefundable fee is required of all students who take the following labora- 
tory courses in Geology: 



Course 
Geol. 2 
Geol. 4 



Per Semester 

$2.00 

2.00 



Course 
Geol. 202 



Per Semester 
$2.00 



BACHELOR OF SCIExNCE IN GEOLOGY 

Students planning to seek employment in the petroleum industry should take 
Math. 16 and Math. 17. A total of 132 hours is required, of which a minimum of 
124 hours must be established in subjects exclusive of credits earned in required 
Physical Education, English 0, and Math. 2. 



First 


Year 


Second 


[ Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


Chem. 15 4 


Chem. 16 4 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Geol. 1 3 


Geol. 3 3 


Geol. 125 1 


C.E. 1 2 


Geol. 2 1 


Geol. 4 1 


Geol. 184 4 


Geol. 185 4 


Math. 3 3 


Math. 4 3 


Math. 15 4 


Mil. or A.S. 4° 2 


Mil. or A.S. 1° 2 


Mil. or A.S. 2° 2 


Mil. or A.S. 3° 2 


Electives 3 


Phys. Ed. 1 1 


Phys. Ed. 2 1 







16 



'Optional. 



16 



18 



18 



Summer Session Before Fourth Year 

Geol. 266 (5 weeks) 



Hr. 



Third Year 



First Sem. 
Geol. 127 
Geol. 151 
Geol. 270 
Physics 1 (11) 
Electives 



Hr. Second Srtn. Hr. 

2 English 126 3 
4 Geol. 231 4 

3 Geol. 261 3 

4 Physics 2 (102) 4 
4-5 Electives 2-3 

L7-18 16-17 



Fourth Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Geol. 221 3 Geol. 235 4 

Electives 14 Electives 13 



17 



17 



142 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY 



See General Requirements for All Degrees on page 100. 



First Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Foreign language 3 Foreign language 3 



Geo!. 1 
Geol. 2 
Math. 2 or 3 
Mil. or A.S. 1 
Phys. Ed. 1 



First Sem. 
Geol. 151 
Physics 1 
Electives 



Geol. 3 
Geol. 4 
Math. 4 
Mil. or A.S. 2* 
Phys. Ed. 2 



16 

Third Year 
Hr. Second Sem. 



3 

1 
3 
2 
2 

16 



Chem. elective 
Geol. 261 
Physics 2 
Electives 



Hr. 
3 
3 
4 

7-8 



First Sem. 
Chem. 15 4 

Foreign language 3 
Geol. 184 4 

Mil. or A.S. 3° 2 
Electives 3-4 



Second Year 
Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 
Chem. 16 4 

Foreign language 3 
Geog. 109 3 

Mil. or A.S. 4° 2 
Electives 3-4 



17 15-16 

Fourth Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Geol. 127 2 English 126 3 

Geol. 221 3 Geol. 231 4 

Electives 12 Electives 10 



17 



17-18 



17 



17 



•Optional. 



Courses of Instruction in Geology 

Lower Division 

1. Physical Geology. I, II. 3 hr. Description of composition and structure of 
earth; physical processes which change earth's surface. Accompanied by Geol. 
2 to meet requirements for 4 hr. credit in a laboratory science in physical 
geology. 

2. Physical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. Accompanies Geol. 1. 

3. Historical Geology. I, II. 3 hr. Evolution of earth and its inhabitants. Accom- 
panied by Geol. 4 to meet requirements of 4 hr. credit in a laboratory science 
in historical geology. 

4. Historical Geology Laboratory. I, II. 1 hr. Accompanies Geol. 3. 

5. Introduction to Geology. I, II. 3 hr. Designed especially for non-science 
majors. Composition and structure of earth and geologic processes which 
shape its surface. Accompanied by Geol. 2 to meet requirements for 4 hr. 
credit in a laboratory science in physical geology. 



125. 
127. 

151. 



184. 



Upper Division 

Geologic Drafting. I. 1 hr. 

Map Interpretation. I. 2 hr. PR: Geol. 2, 4. Relation of earth structure and 
history to land forms as shown on topographic maps. 

Structural Geology. I. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 1. Shape and position of rock masses 
in the earth's crust; mechanical principles underlying various types of rock 
deformation; indication of economic importance of deformed rock structures 
with respect to recovery of mineral products. 

Mineralogy. I. 4 hr. PR: 1 year of geology. Elements of crystallography and 
systematic study of minerals except silicates. Identification of minerals by 
their physical properties supplemented by blow-pipe analysis. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 



J 13 



185. Mineralog) and Petrography. II. 4 hr. PR: Ceol. 184. Description, mode of 
occurrence, and classification of silicate minerals and rocks. 

201. Physical Geology for Teachers. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: High school teaching cer- 
tificate and consent. Composition and structure of earth and the geologic 
processes which shape its surface. 

2<>2. Physical Geology Laboratory for Teachers. I, II, S. 1 hr. Accompanies Geol. 
201. Laboratory and field study of earth materials and features, and the 
topographic and geologic maps used to represent them. 

218. Geology and the Earth Sciences. 4 hr. PR: Open only to members of N.S.F. 
Summer Institute. 'Hie physical nature of the earth. Rotation, revolution, 
shape, and structure of the earth. Geologic forces changing the earth. Geo- 
logic history. 

221. Geomorphology. I. 3 hr. Surface features of eastern United States. 

222. Geomorphology. II. 3 hr. (Alternate years). Surface features of western United 
States. 

228. Photogeology. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 127, 151. Instruction in basic and advanced 
techniques of air photo interpretation. 

231. Invertebrate Paleontology. II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 3, 4. Invertebrate fossils; bio- 
logic classification, evolutionary development, and use in correlation of strata. 

235. Introductory Paleobotany. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 3 and/or Bot. 2. Resume of 
development of principal plant groups through the ages, present distribution, 
mode of occurrence and index species, methods of collection. 

261. Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. II. 3 hr. Study of sediments and sedimentary 
rocks. Field techniques stressed as data gathered and interpreted from rocks 
of Pennsylvanian age in Morgantown vicinity. Two-day field trip required. 

262. Sedimentology Field Course. S. 3-6 hr. Field-lab course in experimental, 
modern and ancient sedimentation. Living expenses in addition to tuition must 
be paid at time of registration. 

263. Ground-Water Hydrology. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 1 or consent. Study of the prin- 
ciples of ground-water hydrology; occurrence, development, uses, and con- 
servation of ground-water. 

266. Appalachian Geology Field Camp. S. 6 hr. PR: Geol. 231, 261. Practical ex- 
perience in detailed geological field procedures and mapping. Living ex- 
penses in addition to tuition must be paid at time of registration. 

269. X-Ray Diffraction. I, II. 3 hr. The theory of X-ray diffraction and application 
to the analysis of crystalline materials using the powder camera and X-ray 
diffractometer. Open to advanced students in geology, chemistry, engineering 
and related fields with consent of instructor. 

270. Mineral Resources. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 1, 2. General survey of character, 
origin, and distribution of natural mineral resources, including mineral fuels, 
nonmetallic minerals, ore deposits, and ground-water. 

272. Petroleum Geology. II. 1-4 hr. PR: Geol. 151. Origin, geologic distribution, 
methods oi exploration and exploitation, uses and future reserves of petroleum 
and natural gas in the world. 

274. Problems in Economic Geology and Geochemistry. I, II. 1-4 hr. PR: Consent. 

285. Optical Mineralogy. I. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 185 and one year of physics. Principles 
and practice in use of the petrographic microscope in identification ol min- 
erals. Emphasis on determination 1>\ Immersion method. 

290. Geologic Problems. 1, II. L-6 In. Special problems for seniors and graduates. 

2' J I Seminar. I. 1 hr. 

/// 



294. Introductory- Geochemistry. I. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 185 or consent. Evolution of 
earth as suggested by chemical and physical data, followed by topics of cur- 
rent interest, including geologic thermometry, oxidation potential and pH, 
and geochemical prospecting. 

295. Geochemistry. II. 3 hr. PR: Geol. 185 or consent. Mineral systems at low 
temperatures and low pressures considered in terms of partial pressure, oxida- 
tion potential, and pH. Laboratory study includes directed investigation of a 
topic of interest to the student. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

A minimum of 124 hours must be established in subjects exclusive of credits 
earned in required Physical Education, Military Science or Air Force Aerospace 
Studies, English 0, and Math. 2. It is strongly recommended that any student major- 
ing in geography should have a strong minor in either economics, sociology, political 
science, history, geology, or statistics (other fields will be considered upon petition.) 
The elective hours in the Junior and Senior years are to be used for this specific 
purpose. Students who intend to do graduate work should take at least Math. 15 in 
lieu of Math. 8. 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Geog. 109 


3 


Geog. 108 


3 


Geol. 1 


3 


Geog. 8 


3 


Math. 8 


3 


Foreign language 3 


Geol. 2 


1 


Geol. 3 


3 


Econ. 51 


3 


Geog. 161 


3 


Geog. 7 


3 


Geol. 4 


1 


Foreign langi 


jage 3 


Sociol. 1 


3 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 










Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 












17 




17 




15 




15 




Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Geog. 251 


3 


Geog. 116 


3 


Geog. 216 


3 


Geog. 214 


3 


Statistics 211 


3 


Geog. 218 


3 


Electives 


13 


Geog. 219 


3 


Hist. 52 


3 


Statistics 212 


3 






Electives 


10 


Sociol. 2 or 51 3 


Electives 


7 










Electives 


4 















L6 



16 



16 



16 



8. 



Courses of Instruction in Geography 

Lower Division 

Introduction to Geography. I, II. 3 hr. Basic principles of the discipline, in- 
cluding maps, climate, physiographic, urban, political and cultural geography 
Not open to students who have completed either Geography 7 or 8. 

Physical Geography. I, II. 3 hr. Study of earth's physical regions as modified 
and classified by man. 

Human Geography. I, II. 3 hr. Study of land use and settlement patterns re- 
sulting from man's occupance of the earth. 



Upper Division 

1 OS. Geography of Natural Resources. 

natural resources in the United 
resource-development projects. 



II. 3 hr. Nature and distribution of the 
States and factors involved in planning 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 



145 



109. Economic Geography. I, II. 3 hr. Earth's land use patterns and interactions 
that result from man's economic activities. 

116. Geography of Anglo-America. I. 3 hr. Regional characteristics and problems 
of development. 

118. Geography of Western Europe. I. 3 hr. Regional characteristics and problems 
of development. 

161. Weather and Climate. II. 3 hr. Processes of weather and patterns of climate 
and their significance to man. 

214. Historical Geography of Anglo-America. II. 3 hr. Exploration, settlement, and 
changing patterns of human occupance from the sixteenth century to the 
present; cultural areas and their significance. 

216. Urban Geography. II. 3 hr. Location, development and change of urban land 
use patterns. 

218. Political Geography. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Examination of spatial inter- 
relationships of man and his environment in a political setting. 

219. Problems in Geography. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Consent. 

220. Seminar in Geography. I, II. 3 hr. per sem.; maximum 12 hr. 

240. Geography of the USSR and Eastern Europe. II. 3 hr. Regional characteristics 
and problems of development. 

251. Cartography. I. 3 hr. Theory and practice of map design. 



HISTORY 

History majors are required to complete 12 hours in lower-division history 
courses, and 18 hours in upper-division history courses. Courses in Group A are re- 
quired of all majors at the lower-division level. Of the 18 hours in upper-division 
history courses at the 100 course level, the major should divide his course selections 
equally between Groups B and C below. With the approval of his adviser, he may 
elect options at higher course levels. 



Group A 
Group B 
Group C 



History 1, 2, 52, 53. 

History 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156. 

History 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108. 



CURRICULUM FOR A.B. WITH MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Second Year 

First Sem. Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 

Lab. Sci. 4 English Lit* 3 
Foreign language 3 Foreign language 3 

Hist. 52 3 Hist. 53 3 

Econ. 51 3 Econ. 52 3 

Pol. Sci. 1 3 Pol. Sci. 2 3 

Phys. Ed. 1 Elective 3 

Phys. Ed. 1 

17 17 17 19 



First 


Year 


First Setn. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 2 


1 r oreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Lai). Sci. 4 


Lab. Sci. 4 


Hist. 1 3 


Hist. 2 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. 1 



•Teacher*! Certification. 

146 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


History 


6 


History 


6 


History 


6 


I listory 


3-6 


Minor 


3 


Minor 


3 


Minor 


3-6 


Minor or 




Electives 


6-9 


Electives 


6-9 


Electives 


6-9 


Electives 


3-6 














Electives 


6-9 



15-18 



15-18 



15-18 



15-18 



Courses of Instruction in History 
Lower Division* 

1. Western Civilization from the Earliest Times to the Reformation. I, II. 3 hr. 

2. Western Civilization from the Reformation to the Present. I, II. 3 hr. 

52. Growth of the American Nation to 1865. I, II. 3 hr. 

53. Making of Modern America, 1865 to the Present. I, II. 3 hr. 

°A11 first- and second-year courses are offered as lower-division "year-courses". These 
courses run through the year, but in no case is the first half-year a prerequisite for the second 
half. For example, Hist. 1 is not a prerequisite for Hist. 2. Hist. 1 and 2 make up the introductory 
first year in history. Hist. 52 and 53 are primarily for sophomores but are open to freshmen. 



Upper Division 

101. History of Ancient Times: Stone Age to the Fall of Rome. 3 hr. 

102. Medieval Europe: Fall of Rome to the Renaissance. 3 hr. 

103. Modern Europe, 1500-1763. 3 hr. 

104. Modern Europe, 1763-1871. 3 hr. 

105. Modern Europe, 1871 to Present. 3 hr. 

106. British Civilization to 1660. 3 hr. 

107. British Civilization Since 1660. 3 hr. 

149. The United States and Pennsylvania. 3 hr. 

150. West Virginia. 3 hr. 

151. The American Colonial and Revolutionary Experience. 3 hr. 

152. The Early Republic, United States, 1781 to 1861. 3 hr. 

153. The United States, 1865 to 1918. 3 hr. 

154. Recent America, United States Since 1918. 3 hr. 

155. Latin American History, Colonial Period and the Wars of Independence. 3 hr. 

156. Latin America Since 1824. 3 hr. 

200. Social and Economic History of the Middle Ages, 300-1000. 3 hr. 

201. Social and Economic History of the Middle Ages, 1000-1500. 3 hr. 

202. The Renaissance. 3 hr. 

203. The Reformation. 3 hr. 

204. English Social History, 14th to 18th Century. 3 hr. 

205. English Social History, 18th Century to the Present. 3 hr. 

206. French Revolution and Napoleon. 3 hr. 

207. History of Modern France. 3 hr. 

208. History of Russia from Ancient Times to Alexander III. 3 hr. 



HISTORY 



147 



2(H). History of Russia: The Revolutionary Era and the Soviet Period. 3 hr. 

210. European Diplomatic History, 1815 to 1919. 3 hr. 

211. European Diplomatic History, 1919 to Present. 3 hr. 

212. History of Germany from the Roman Era to the Early 19th Century. 3 hr. 

213. History of Modern Germany. 3 hr. 

214. Modern Spain. 3 hr. 

215. History of Modern China. 3 hr. 
2 Hi. History of Modern Japan. 3 hr. 

230. The ABC Powers of Latin America. 3 hr. 

250. Economic and Social Development of West Virginia. 3 hr. 

253. The American Frontier East of the Mississippi. 3 hr. 

254. The American Frontier West of the Mississippi. 3 hr. 

255. History of the Negro in America. 3 hr. 

256. The Old South. 3 hr. 

257. The American Civil War. 3 hr. 

258. The New South. 3 hr. 

259. The United States from McKinley to the New Deal, 1898 to 1933. 3 hi. 

260. American Diplomacy to 1901. 3 hr. 

261. American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy, 1901 to the Present. 3 hr. 
269. Recent American History, 1933 to the Present. 3 hr. 

279. American Economic History to 1865. 3 hr. 

280. American Economic History Since 1865. 3 hr. 

281. The American Labor Movement. 3 hr. 

290. Intellectual and Social History of the United States to 1876. 3 hr. 

291. Intellectual and Social History of the United States Since 1876. 3 hr. 

292. European Intellectual History to the Age of Enlightenment. 3 hr. 

293. European Intellectual History from the Age of Enlightenment to the Present. 

3 hr. 



THE HUMANITIES 

1, 2. Introductory' General Course. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. This course takes cross 
sections of Western Civilization at its most significant points. Within an his- 
torical framework, it treats of the principal developments and landmarks of 
literature, philosophy, art, architecture, and music from pre-Greeo-Roman 
times up to now, comparing the 1 past with the present and interrelating the 
various aspects ol our civilization. A special syllabus helps lie together the 
materia] of the course. 

3,4. Seminar. I, II. I hr. per sem. Optional discussion group for students in Hu- 
manities 1 and 2. Affords participants an opportunity to talk informally about 

selected topics pertinent to the main course. Limited to 20 students. 

101. Classical Culture in the Modern World. I. 3 hi. This course introduces the 
student to classical culture through the study of Greco-Roman art, religion, 
philosophy, literature, science, and law. as well as daily life and customs, and 
their influence upon the present day. 

148 



102. Classical Myths in the Modern World. II. 3 hr. This course introduces the 
student to classical myths of gods and heroic legends and their influence upon 
modern culture. 

141. Great Books. (First Course). I. 3 hr. This course considers six literary master- 
pieces in translation: Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex and Antigone, 
Dante's Divine Comedy, Cervantes' Don Quixote, and Goethe's Faust. Taken 
separately and in order, they represent the Greek world, the Middle Ages, the 
Renaissance, and the Modem period. Taken as a group, they illustrate the 
persistent conflict between the actual and the ideal in the literature of West- 
ern Civilization. 

142. Great Books. (Second Course). II. 3 hr. This course considers five literary 
masterpieces of which four are in translation: Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, 
Benvenuti Cellini's Memoirs, Montaigne's Essays, Rousseau's Confessions, and 
The Education of Henry Adams. These personal evaluations of the problems 
of life, ranging from the Roman Empire to modem America, constitute the 
integrating principle of the course. 

143. Great Books. (Third Course). I. 3 hr. This course considers selected master- 
pieces of scientific writing, including Lucretius' On the Nature of Things, 
Francis Bacon's Novum Organum, Descartes' Discourse on Method, Charles 
Darwin's Origin of Species, Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams, and White- 
head's Science and the Modern World. Taken as a group, these works provide 
a survey from the ancient world to the present day of the impact of science 
in the realm of the humanities. 

144. Great Books. (Fourth Course). II. 3 hr. This course considers a group of great 
and provocative creations of societies, ideal or not so ideal, starting with Sir 
Thomas More's Utopia and including Bacon's The New Atlantis, Butler's 
Erewhon, Bellamy's Looking Backward, B. F. Skinner's Walden Two, Hux- 
ley's Brave New World, and Orwell's 1984. Taken as a group, these works 
provide a record of modern man's hopes and fears in his attempt to adjust to 
a world of rapid technological and social change. 

181, 182. American Civilization. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. This course acquaints the 
student with the salient characteristics of American Civilization as they have 
developed since the planting of European colonies on this continent. Emphasis 
is placed on the unique contributions of successive arrivals on American 
shores to the making of the distinctive American culture, as evidenced in its 
folkways, arts, and philosophy. The central theme of the course is the mani- 
festation of the democratic spirit in the thought and feelings of the American 
people. 

250. Culture Tour of Europe. S. 6 hr. PR: Some cultural background in European 
civilization such as Humanities 1 and 2, History 1 and 2, art survey courses, 
or equiv., or consent. 

260. Culture Tour of Latin America. S. 6 hr. PR: Some cultural or historical back- 
ground in Latin America, such as history or art courses, or consent. 

270. Cradle of History Tour of the Near East. S. 6 hr. PR: Humanities 1 and 2, 

History 1 and 2, or equiv., or consent. 

280. Around-the-World Culture Tour. S. 6 hr. PR: A course in world or western 
civilization, such as Humanities 1 and 2, History 1 and 2, or consent. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Courses in undergraduate library science are designed to meet the needs of 
students preparing to qualify for State certification as teacher-librarians in public 
schools, students who desire a general program in library science, and students who 
are interested in preparing for graduate study in librarianship. A student planning 
to serve as a school librarian must complete the minimum number of hours of Edu- 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 149 



cation courses required for certification. Students wishing to enter other fields of 
library m i< nee should plan their programs to include appropriate courses. 



CURRICULUM FOR A.B. DEGREE WITH MAJOR IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 



First Sem. 

English 1 3 

Foreign language 3 

Laboratory Sci. 4 

Lib. Sci. 1 3 

Electives 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 



First Year 

Hr. Second Sem. II r. 
English 2 3 

Foreign language 3 

Laboratory Sci. 4 
Electives 2-7 

Phys. Ed. 1 



18 



16-18 



First Sen}. 

Lib. Sci. 223 3 

Humanities 141 

Great Books I 3 
Electives 12 



Third Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. 
3 Lib. Sci. 224 3 
Humanities 142 

Great Books II 3 
Electives 15 



Second Year 



First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 3 


3 


English 4 


3 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Soc. Sci. or 




Soc. Sci. or 




Pol. Sci. 


4 


Pol. Sci. 


4 


Lib. Sci. 101 


3 


Electives 


7 


Electives 


4 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 








18 




18 




Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Lib. Sci. 222 


3 


Lib. Sci. 227 


3 


Lib. Sci. 226 
Electives 


3 
12 


Electives 


15 



14-18 



14-18 



18 



18 



Courses of Instruction in Library Science 

1. Using Books and Libraries. I, II, S. 3 hr. Planned to give working knowledge 
of library facilities, particularly of the University Library. General reference 
sources, basic principles of cataloging, and departments of the library are 
studied. A course that is useful to any student in the University. 

101. Reference and Bibliography. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Basic reference books, 
dictionaries, encyclopedias, indexes, yearbooks, and other reference materials 
are studied and evaluated, with emphasis on the theory and practical ex- 
perience of reference books. Required for Library Science majors. 

203. Library Materials for Children. I, II, S. 3 hr. Survey of the development of 
children's literature with emphasis on modern books. Evaluation of the aids 
and standards for selection of books and materials in this field. Investigation 
of children's reading interests and storytelling techniques. Discussions, re- 
ports, and special projects. 

205. Book Selection for Secondary School Libraries. I, S. 3 hr. A study of print 
and non print materials for junior and senior high school libraries. Practice in 
use of general and specialized aids; techniques lor making library resource's 
appealing to young people. 

207. Organization and Administration of the Instructional Materials Center in the 
Secondary School. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Lib. Sci. 205, 223; for school librarians. A 
study of organization and administration, including planning, equipment, 
routines and schedules, and the role of the librarian in the instructional pro- 
gram. 

221. Public and Regional Library Service. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Principles govern- 
ing the administration ol tax-supported public libraries and the development 
of larger units of service. Objectives, functions, control, finances, building and 
equipment, personnel, special services. 

222. Field Practice. I, II, S. 3 hr. Designed to promote an understanding of total 
library programs and the interrelations of library methods and skills found in 
the different libraries. A minimum of 100 clock hours are required to be com- 
pleted by the student. Taken only after basic courses have been completed. 

150 



223. Cataloging and Classification. I, S. 3 hr. Basic principles and problems of 
cataloging and classification combined with practical experience in processing 
the various types of books and materials. Problems peculiar to the school 
librarian will be considered. 

224. History of Books and Libraries. I, S. 3 hr. A survey course, including the 
development of the books from early manuscript form, history of printing, 
printers, book illustrations, bindings, and the library and its development. 

225. Books and Reading for Adults. II, S. 3 hr. Reading and evaluation of repre- 
sentative books in broad subject fields. Stress on both modern titles and the 
classics for the adult leader. Emphasis on book reviewing, both written and 
oral, with a study of book selection aids. Class discussions, problems, term 
reports. 

226. Literature of the Social Sciences. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. An approach to the 
selection and use of books and materials in the social sciences. 

227. Literature of the Humanities. II, S. 3 hr. Bibliographical and other reference 
sources in the major subject areas of the humanities, including religion, phi- 
losophy, fine arts, music, and literature. 

228. Literature of Science and Technology. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Designed to 
give the student a good working knowledge of the increasingly complex 
literature of science and technology. 

230. Library Resources for the School Curriculum. II, S. 3 hr. Broadened experi- 
ences in both library and outside resources that lend themselves to curriculum 
enrichment, including guidance, remedial reading, text books, community re- 
sources, all phases of audio-visuals, etc. Presented to elementary and secon- 
dary teachers as well as librarians. 

235. Organization and Administration of the Instructional Materials Center in the 
Elementary School. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Lib. Sci. 223; for school librarians. In- 
cludes planning quarters, selection, acquisition and organization of books and 
other materials, supervision of library assistants, relations with faculty, ad- 
ministration and community. 

MATHEMATICS, ASTRONOMY, AND STATISTICS 

A student must have a grade-point average of 2.0 or higher in mathematics 
courses in the lower division before he will be admitted to the upper division as a 
mathematics major. 

Lower-division students who plan to become majors in the Department, who 
also wish to meet the requirements for teacher certification, should so inform their 
lower-division adviser, and plan their schedules carefully in order to avoid loss of 
time. 

The foreign language should be French, German, or Russian. 

Mathematics majors must complete 24 hours of mathematics beyond calculus, 
including Math. 235, 236, 237, 243, 251, and 252. 

SUGGESTED MATHEMATICS PROGRAM 



First Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

English 1 3 
Foreign language 3 

Math. 15 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 
Electives Core 

Gp. A or B 3-8 



16-17 



Second Sem. Hr. 
English 2 3 

Foreign language 3 



Math. 16 
Phys. Ed. 
Electives Core 
Gp. A or B 



4 
1 

3-8 



16-17 



Second 

First Sem. Hr. 

Foreign language 3 
Math. 17 4 

Elective Core 

Group C 4-5 
Phys Ed. 1 

Electives Core 

Gp. A or B 3-8 



Year 

Second Sem. Hr. 
Foreign language 3 
Math. 235 or 236 3 
Elective Core 

Group C 4-5 
Phys. Ed. 1 

Electives Core 

Gp. A or B 



17-18 
MATHEMATICS 



3-8 

17-18 
151 



Third 


Year 




Fourth Year 




First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. Second Sem 


Hr. 


Math. 236 or 235 3 


Math. 237 


3 


Math. 251 3 Math. 252 


3 


El< i ti\ es Core 


Math. 243 


3 


Math, elective 3 Math, elective 


3 


Gp. A or B 0-3 


Electives Core 




Electives 12 Electives 


12 


Electives 12 


Gp. A or B 
Electives 


0-3 
12 







18 



18 



18 



is 



Courses of Instruction in Mathematics 

Math. and 1 are offered to enable students to remove entrance conditions in 
mathematics. Each course meets throughout the school year. Neither course carries 
University credit, although each is considered equivalent to three hours per semester 
in calculating student course loads. 

Self-instruction programmed course materials in Math. and 1 are available on 
a rental basis. 



2. 



Pre-College 

Elementary Algebra. I and II. x k unit per sem. A two-semester course equiva- 
lent to first-year high school algebra. 

Geometry. I and II. A unit per sem. A two-semester course covering the usual 
material of high school plane and solid geometry. 

Algebra. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 1 unit of algebra. 



Lower Division 

3. College Algebra. I, II. 3 hr. PR: VA units of algebra and a satisfactory per- 
formance on the American College Test or Math. 2, and 1 unit of geometry. 

4. Plane Trigonometry. I, II. 3 hr. PR: VA units of algebra and a satisfactory 
performance on the American College Test or Math. 2, and 1 unit of geome- 
try. 

8. Finite Mathematics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Two years of high school algebra or 
Math. 3. Logic, sets, partitions, probability theory, vectors, matrices, linear 
programming, and applications in commerce. 

14. Pre-Calculus Mathematics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: IX units of algebra and 1 unit of 
geometry. A treatment of algebra, analytic geometry, and trigonometry neces- 
sary for the study of calculus. 

15. Calculus I. I, II. 4 hr. PR: 2 units of algebra, Vi unit trigonometry, and satis- 
factory performance on the American College Test, or Math. 3 and 4, or Math. 
14. Introduction to the calculus with analytic geometry. 

16. Calculus II. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Math. 15. Completion of plane analytic geometry 
as needed for geometric applications of the calculus, techniques of integration, 
further interpretations of the definite integral, and infinite series. 

17. Calculus III. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Math. 16. Solid analytic geometry, calculus of 
two or more variables, and introduction to differential equations. 

21, 22. Introduction to Mathematics. I, II. 2 hr. per sem. PR: 1 unit of algebra. 
Reasoning, development of elementary mathematics, function and limit con- 
cepts, topics in modern mathematics, the nature of mathematics and its re- 
lation to modern civilization. 

31. Introduction to Computing Concepts. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 3 or consent. An 
introduction to how computers work, computer system organization, flow dia- 
grams, simple FORTRAN programming. A discussion of some recent develop- 
ments in computing, areas of applications, and their significance. 



152 



56, 57. Introductory Mathematics for Elementary Teachers. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. 
PR: One unit of high school algebra. Structure of the number systems; tech- 
niques of arithmetic computation derived from the properties of the real 
number system; informal geometry. 

Upper Division 

106. Mathematical Logic 1. I. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 4 or consent. A study of the logic 
of statements, predicates, and identity (equivalent to Philos. 106). 

110. Digital Computer Programming. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Math. 3. Preparation and 
execution of Fortran computer programs. 

125. Theory of Games. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. Elements of Matrix 
Algebra and Probability. Theory of Games, including decision theory, linear 
and dynamic programming, and strategy. 

131. Introduction to Numerical Procedures. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. 
Finite differences, zeros of polynomials, interpolation and approximation, linear 
equations, least squares, quadrature, numerical methods for ordinary differ- 
ential equations. This course is intended for those students who are interested 
in immediate applications and do not intend to pursue further studies in 
numerical analysis. 

138. Modern Geometry for Teachers. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. For high 
school teachers. Foundations of geometry. Special topics from Euclidean, pro- 
jective, and non-Euclidean geometries. 

140. Differential Equations. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Primarily for engineers and 
scientists. Ordinary differential equations and applications; simultaneous sys- 
tems, solution by series; numerical methods; boundary value problems and 
Fourier series. 

148. History of Mathematics. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 15. Survey of the development 
of mathematics through the calculus, with emphasis on the mathematical 
theories and techniques of each period and their historical evolution. 

159. Introduction to the Laplace Transform. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Introduction 
at the undergraduate level to the theory and application of the Laplace trans- 
form. 

170. Structure of the Real Numbers. I, II. 3 hr. PR: One year each of high school 
algebra and geometry, Math. 56, Math. 57. For elementary education majors. 
The real numbers as a complete ordered field and its subsystems. Linear and 
quadratic equations and inequalities, modular arithmetic, functions, matrices, 
complex numbers, and algebraic structures. 

171. Infonnal Geometry for Elementary Teachers. I, II. 3 hr. PR: One year of high 
school algebra and geometry, Math. 56, 57, 170, or consent. Logic, finite 
geometries, and an informal approach to the concepts of congruence, similarity, 
parallelism, measure, symmetry, symmetry groups, and coordinate geometry 
as related to Euclidean geometry. 

201, 202. Combinatorial Analysis. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: One year of calculus. 
Permutations, combinations, generating functions, principle of inclusion and 
exclusion, distribution, partitions, compositions, trees, and networks. 

206. Mathematical Logic 2. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 106. Formalization of the 
material in the previous term, the concepts of consistency, decidability, and 
completeness (equiv. to Philos. 206). 

208. 209. Theory of Probability. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Math. 17. Fundamental 
theorems. Development of density and distribution functions in the discrete 
and continuous cases. Classical problems and solutions. Moments, character- 
istic functions, limit theorems. Applications. 

MATHEMATICS 153 



213. Intermediate Differential Equations. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140, 252 (or 258). 
Second-order linear equations, Riccato equations, complex variables. Series 
solutions. Equations of Fuchsian type, hypergeometric equation, confluence 
of singularities. Classical equations, applications. 

214. Partial Differential Equations. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Primarily for engineers 
and scientists. One-dimensional wave equation, linear second-order equations 
in two variables, elliptic and parabolic equations, Fourier series, non- 
homogeneous and higher dimension problems, Sturm-Liouville theory, and 
approximate methods. 

215. Operational Methods in Partial Differential Equations. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 
140, 252, (or 258). Laplace transformation, properties and elementary appli- 
cations; problems in partial differential equations; complex variable; prob- 
lems in heat conduction, mechanical vibrations, etc. Sturm-Liouville systems. 
Fourier transforms. 

220, 221. Introduction to Numerical Analysis. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 and Math. 
237 or Math. 245 or consent. Approximation of functions, iteration proce- 
dures, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical solution of linear 
and non linear equations, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, 
error analysis and pitfalls of computation. 

230, 231. Theory of Numbers. I, II. 3 hr. PR: One year of calculus. Introduction 
to classical number theory, covering such topics as divisibility, the Euclidean 
algorithm, Diophantine equations, congruences, primitive roots, quadratic resi- 
dues, number-theoretic functions, distribution of primes, irrationals, and com- 
binatorial methods. Special numbers, such as those of Bernoulli, Euler, and 
Stirling. 

232. Mathematical Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Discrete and continuous 
variables; correlation, regression, sampling theory, normal, chi-square, t, and 
F distributions; significance tests; analysis of variance. 

235. Introduction to Analysis and Topology. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. 
A study of sets, relations, functions; cardinal numbers, and orderings. Topo- 
logical spaces including continuity, covergence, separation, compactness, and 
connectedness. 

236. Introduction to Algebraic Structures. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. 

Basic study of groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and polynomial rings. 
Special consideration of the real and complex fields and related topics. 

237. Introduction to Linear Algebra. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17 or consent. A study 
of vector spaces, matrices, determinants, linear transformations, linear pro- 
gramming, bilinear and quadratic forms, and related topics. 

243. Projective Geometry. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 236, 237 or consent. Projective and 
affine spaces, transformation groups for pianos. Introduction to axiomatic 
plane geometries. 

245. Vector Analysis. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Primarily for engineers and scien- 
tists. Vector algebra, differential operators, curvilinear coordinate systems, 
Stoke's and Gauss' theorems, applications, linear systems of equations, 
matrices, determinants, quadratic forms, eigenvalues and canonical forms, and 
numerical inversions. 

247. Theorj of Numbers. S. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Divisibility, distribution of primes, 
theory of congruences, theory of quadratic residues, arithmetical properties oi 
the roots of unity. Diophantine equations, and the prime number theorem. 

2.11. 252. Introduction to Real Analysis. I, II. 3 hi. PR: Math. 235 or consent. A 
study ol sequences, limits, continuity, definite integral, convergence, differ- 
entiation, differentials, functional dependence, multiple integrals, line and 

surface integrals, and differential forms. 

154 



256. Complex Variables. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Complex numbers, functions of 
a complex variable; analytic functions; the logarithm and related functions; 
power series; Laurent series and residues; conformal mapping and applica- 
tions. 

257, 258. Advanced Calculus. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Primarily for engineers 
and scientists. Functions of several variables, partial differentiation, implicit 
functions, transformations; line, surface and volume integrals; point set theory, 
continuity, integration, infinite series and convergence, power series, and im- 
proper integrals. 

260. Advanced Real Calculus. S. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Limits, series, metric spaces, 
uniformity, integrals. 

261, 262, 263. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2-4 hr. Topics in algebra, geometry, and 
analysis. 

264, 265. Foundations of Algebra. S. 2 hr. PR: Differential and integral calculus, 
or consent. Not open to students with credit for Math. 236. Introduction to 
algebraic structures; rings, the integral domain of integers, properties of the 
integers, fields, polynomials over the field, groups; matrices; linear systems; 
vector spaces; vector geometry; linear transformations; and linear program- 
ming. 

266, 267. Foundation of Geometry. S. 2 hr. PR: Differential and integral calculus, 
or consent. A study of affine, projective, Euclidean, and non-Euclidean ge- 
ometries. 

268, 269. Probability and Statistics. S. 2 hr. PR: Differential and integral calculus, 
or consent. Finite sample space, measure of the set of outcomes and prob- 
ability of events, independent trials, functions on the sample space, approxi- 
mations to the binomial distribution, elementary statistical inference, con- 
tinuous sample spaces, limit theorems, stochastic processes, statistical models 
and applications. 

270, 271. Introduction to Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher. I, II. 3 hr. 
per sem. PR: Math. 56, 57 or consent. Systems of numeration; sets, relations, 
binary operations, decimal and other base systems; natural numbers, integers, 
rational numbers, and real numbers with emphasis on the algebraic structure 
of each; the notions of length, area, and volume; Pythagorean theorem; and 
coordinate geometry. (Not open to students who have credit for Math. 170, 
171.) 

280. Introduction to Metamathematics I. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Survey of the 
methodology of the deductive sciences with emphasis on the theory of proof 
and effective operations therein (equiv. to Philosophy 280). 

281. Introduction to Metamathematics II. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 280. This course 
deals with recursive function theory. Godel's proof and associated results 
(equiv. to Philosophy 281). 

299. Seminar in Applied Mathematics. I, II. 1-2 hr. 

Courses of Instruction in Astronomy 

Upper Division 

106. Descriptive Astronomy. II. 3 hr. 

216. Astronomy for Teachers. S. 3 hr. Introduction to astronomy with special em- 
phasis on the needs of physical science teachers and science club directors. 
Not open to students with credit for Astron. 106. 

255. Mathematical Astronomy. II. 3 hr. PR: Astron. 106, Math. 140. Development 
of the implications of Kepler's Laws and Newton's Law of Gravitation. 

ASTRONOMY 155 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM IN STATISTICS 



Statistics majors must complete 24 hours of mathematics and/or statistics be- 
yond calculus, including 6 hours each in statistical methods, statistical theory, and 
applied statistics. 



First Year 



First Sem. II r. 

English 1 3 

Foreign language 3 
Math. 15 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Electives— Core 
Cp. A or B 3-8 



16-18 



Second Sent. Hr. 
English 2 3 

Foreign language 3 
Math. 16 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Electives— Core 
Gp. A or B 3-8 



16-18 



Second Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

Foreign language 3 
Math. 17 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Electives— Core 

Gp. A or B 3-8 
Elective— Core 

Gp. C 4 



16-18 



Second Sem. Hr. 
Foreign language 3 
Math. 237 3 

Stat. 101 3 

Phys. Ed. 1 

Elective Core 

Gp. C 4 

Electives— Core 

Gp. A or B 0-5 

16-19 



Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Stat. Methods 1 


Stat. Methods 2 


Stat. 261 


3 


Stat. 262 


3 


(Stat. 211 or 


( Stat. 212 or 


Stat, or Math 




Stat, or Math. 




213) 3 


214) 3 


electives 


6 


electives 


3 


Stat. 161 3 


Stat, or Math. 


Electives 


9 


Electives 


12 


Math. 257 3 


elective 3 










Electives— Core 


Math. 258 3 










Gp. A or B 0-3 


Electives— Core 










Electives 6 


Gp. A or B 0-3 

Electives 6 











18 



18 



18 



18 



Courses of Instruction in Statistics 
Upper Division 

101. Introduction to Statistical Methods. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 3. Basic concepts of 
statistical models, distributions, probability, random variables, tests of hy- 
potheses, confidence intervals, regression, correlation, chi-square and index 
numbers. (Equivalent to Econ. 125 and Psych. 130.) 

161. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 16. Probability, 
discrete and continuous probability distributions, expectations, sums of ran- 
dom variables, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, tests of 
hypotheses. 

201. Intermediate Statistical Methods. II. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 101. Extension of basic 
concepts of statistical models, elementary decision theory, estimation, random 
variables, one- and two-day classification models, analysis of variance, F- 
distribution, lime series, seasonal and cyclical movements, simple and mul- 
tiple linear regression and correlation analysis. (Equivalent to Econ. 256). 

211. Statistical Methods 1. I. II. 3 hi. PR: Math. 3. Basic concepts of statistical 
models, distributions, probability, random variables, tests of hypotheses, con- 
fidence intervals, regression, correlation, transformations, F and X 2 distribu- 
tions, analysis of variance lor one- and two-way classification models, mul- 
tiple range tests, missing plots, and sample size. (Equivalent to Psvch. 211 
and Fd. 211.) 

212. Statistical Methods 2. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 211, Stat. 213, or Stat. 201. Ex- 
tension of basic concepts ol statistical models, design of experiments, multi- 
was- classification models, factorials, split plot design, simple covariance, or- 



156 



thogonal comparisons, multiple linear and nonlinear regression and correlation 
analysis, chi-square, and non-parametric statistics. (Equivalent to Psych. 215.) 

213. Basic Statistical Analysis 1. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 16. Measures of central 
tendency and variation, probability, sampling, probability distributions, infer- 
ence, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, analysis of variance, simple 
linear regression and correlation, and enumeration. (Equivalent to I.E. 244.) 

214. Basic Statistical Analysis 2. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 213 or equiv. Single and 
multi-factor experimental designs; fixed, mixed and random effect models; 
split plot designs; multilinear and nonlinear regression and correlation analy- 
ses; and analysis of covariance. (Equivalent to I.E. 214.) 

215. Statistical Computer Techniques. II. 2 hr. PR: Math. 110 or I.E. 180 and pre- 
or corequisite Stat. 212, or consent. Extension of concepts and skills related 
to using digital computers for statistical analysis. In addition to programming 
statistical analyses and elementary simulations in the Fortran language, pro- 
grams available in the Computing Center Statistical Program Library will be 
utilized. 

221. Design of Experiments. I. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 212 or Stat. 214. Extension of basic 
concepts of statistics to the more complicated models and use of samples, de- 
sign and analysis of experiments over time and space, fractional replications, 
incomplete block designs, cross-over designs, lattice designs, and least squares 
analysis for designs with unequal subclass numbers. 

231. Sampling Methods. I. 3 hr. PR: An introductory course in statistics. Methods 
of sampling from finite and infinite populations, choice of sampling unit, 
sample survey design, estimation of confidence limits and optimum sample 
size, and single and multi-stage sampling procedures. 

233. Xonparametric Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: An introductory course in statistics. 
Single sample tests; tests for related samples, two independent samples, k re- 
lated samples, k independent samples; and measures of correlation. 

241. Multivariate Methods 1. I. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 201, Stat. 211, or Stat. 213. Intro- 
duction to elementary matrix operations, partial and multiple linear and non- 
linear correlation and regression analyses, and introduction to discriminant 
analysis. (Equivalent to Psych. 217.) 

242. Multivariate Methods 2. II. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 241 or equiv. This course includes 
a discussion of the multivariate normal distribution, tests of hypotheses about 
the sample mean vectors and variance-covariance matrices from a multi- 
variate normal distribution, and analysis of variance of multiple responses in 
basic statistical designs. 

261. Theory of Statistics 1. I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17. Probability and random vari- 
ables, univariate and multivariate probability distributions, expectations, mo- 
ment, marginal and conditional distributions, independence, correlation, trans- 
formations, and functions of random variables. 

262. Theory of Statistics 2. II. 3 hr. PR: Stat. 261. Estimation including bias, con- 
sistency, efficiency and sufficiency, hypothesis testing, distribution-free prob- 
lems, order statistics, linear models and analysis of variance, and special dis- 
tributions. 

291. Special Topics. I, II, S. 2-4 hr. Advanced study of special topics in statistics. 



PHILOSOPHY 

The Department of Philosophy encourages its majors to take either a general 
liberal arts and science course, or a strong minor in some recognized discipline with- 
in the University. During the first two years the student will meet most of the 
general requirements of the University and of the College of Arts and Sciences. He 
must take Philos. 101, 102, 106, and 104 or 108. During the junior and senior years 

STATISTICS 157 



he will complete the work of his major and minor and round out his education 
through electives. The student who intends to major in Philosophy should, if possible, 
take the required course, Philos. 106, before the beginning of the junior year. Upon 
consent of the Department of Philosophy, a student may elect to receive credit for 
selected courses in the 100 series (or below) by (a) independent study and (b) passing 
a comprehensive examination on the content of the given course. 

Courses of Instruction in Philosophy 

Lower Division 

10. Introduction to Logic. I or II. 3 hr. This is an informal course on the nature 
of argument. 

11. Introduction to Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. This course presents some of the 
basic philosophical questions and attempts to give defensible answers. 

Upper Division 

101. History of Ancient Philosophy. I. 3 hr. Major philosophies of the Western 
World from the pre-Socrates to Plotinus. 

102. History of Modern Philosophy. II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101 or consent. Major 
philosophies of the Western World from Descartes to J. S. Mill. 

104. Theory of Knowledge. I or II. 3 hr. The major philosophical problems asso- 
ciated with knowledge. 

106. Mathematical Logic 1. I. 3 hr. The logic of statements, predicates, and ident- 
ic)'; elementary set theory (equiv. to Math. 106). 

108. Ethics. I or II. 3 hr. Various theories on the nature of obligations, right and 
good, and the function of punishment. 

110. Problems of Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. An introduction to the major philo- 
sophical problems of past and present. 

114. Recent Philosophy. I. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101 or Philos. 102 or consent. Major 
philosophies of nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 

121. Existentialism. I or II. 3 hr. A survey of the major existentialist thinkers. 

122. Oriental Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. Major philosophies of Asia. 

123. Philosophy of Religion. I or II. 3 hr. An attempt to discover the defensible 
foundations of religion. 

130. Philosophy of Art. I or II. 3 hr. Philosophical problems raised by art and art 
criticism (assumes some acquaintance with arts). 

140. Philosophy of Education. I or II. 3 hr. A study of the various theories on the 
nature of education (equiv. to Educ. 140). 

150. Social and Political Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. Application of moral concepts 
to questions concerning the individual and the state. 

166. Metaphysical Problems. I or II. 3 hr. Traditional problems; e.g., causation, 
time, motion, personal identity, determinism. 

206. Mathematical Logic 2. II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 106 or consent. Formalization oi 
the materia] in the previous term, the concepts of consistency, decidability, 

and completeness (equiv. to Math. 206). 

214. Theory of Knowledge. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 106 and consent. Advanced 
topics in the theory of knowledge. 

218. Ethical Theory. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 108 or consent. Selected, complete 
ethical theories and/or special problems in meta-ethics. 

221. Contemporary Philosophies of Continental Europe. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 
114. A study of the various European thinkers of the present day. 

258 



223. Philosophy of Religion. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 123 or consent. Advanced 
topics in the philosophy of religion. 

230. Aesthetic Theories. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 130 or consent. 

241. Introduction to Analytic Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 102, 106. Con- 
temporary schools of analytic philosophy. 

250. Social and Political Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 150. Advanced topics 
in social and political philosophy. 

253. Philosophy of Mathematics. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 106 or consent. Con- 
temporary viewpoints in the foundations of mathematics. 

258. Philosophy of Science I. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 106 or consent. An analysis 
of the conceptual and methodological foundations of science. 

259. Philosophy of Science II. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 258 or Philos. 106 or 
consent. Further topics including induction, confirmation and cognitive status 
of scientific theories. 

264. Empiricism. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101, 102. Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. 

266. Metaphysics. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 166 or consent. Advanced topics in 
metaphysics. 

268. Rationalism. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101, 102. Descartes, Spinoza, and 
Leibniz. 

270. Greek Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101 and Philos. 102 or consent. 

272. Philosophy of Law. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 108 or Philos. 150. Selected 
topics in foundations and procedures of law. 

278. Medieval Philosophy. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 101, 102. A study of the major 
philosophies of the western world from Plotinus to Descartes. 

280. Introduction to Metamathematics I. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Survey of the 
methodology of the deductive sciences with emphasis on the theory of proof 
and effective operations therein (equiv. to Math. 280). 

281. Introduction to Metamathematics II. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 280. This course 
deals with recursive function theory, Godel's proof and associated results 
(equiv. to Math. 281). 

283. Philosophy of History. I or II. 3 hr. Typical theoretical problems such as the 
nature of historical explanation, relativism, and the status of speculative prin- 
ciples of history. 

285. Philosophy of Language. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 106 or Philos. 104. An 
analysis of the nature of meaning and language. 

287. Philosophy of Mind. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 241 or Philos. 114 or consent. 
Typical problems in this course have to do with whether there are minds, the 
difference between minds and bodies, other minds, and the analysis of mental 
concepts. 

289. Advanced Topics in Logic. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Philos. 206 or Philos. 280. 

290. Seminar: Selected Topic. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

291. Seminar: Selected Topic. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

292. Seminar: Selected Author. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

293. Seminar: Selected Author. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 
299. Problems in Philosophy. I or II. 1-12 hr. PR: Consent. 

PHILOSOPHY 159 



PHYSICS 

Various courses offered in Physics are designed to meet the needs of students 
in the Colleges of Human Resources and Education, Engineering, Arts and Sciences, 
Agriculture and Forestry, and the School of Pharmacy. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR A.B. DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

The Bachelor of Arts degree is intended for those students who wish a founda- 
tion in physics but with a wider choice of elective subjects than is possible for those 
wishing to enter the field at a professional level. A total of 124 hours exclusive of 
Physical Education and English are required. The following are required: Physics 
1-2. 109-110, 225-226, 231-232, 233-234, and 3 semesters of 200-level laboratory 
work; Mathematics 15, 16, 17 plus 3 additional upper-division hours (usually Math. 
140) subject to departmental approval; and Chemistry 15-16. Physics 113-114 is 
strongly recommended. 





First 


Year 






Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Physics 109 


2 


Physics 110 


2 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


Math. 16 


4 


Language 3 


3 


Language 4 


3 


Language 1* 


3 


Language 2 


3 


Physics 113 


3 


Physics 114 


3 


Physics 1 


4 


Physics 2 


4 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Elective Gr. 


At 3 


Elective Gr. A 3 











18 



18 



16 



15 



First Sem. 
Physics 200 
Physics 200- 

Lab. 
Elective Gr. A 
Elective Gr. B 
Elective 
Elective 



Third Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Hr. First Sem. 



Physics 200 
Physics 200- 

Lab. 
Elective Gr. A 
Elective Gr. B 
Elective 
Elective 



Physics 200 
Physics 200 
Physics 200- 

Lab. 
Elective Gr. 
Elective 
Elective 



Fourth Year 

Hr. Second Sem. Ilr. 

Physics 200 3 

Physics 200 3 
Elective Gr. B 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 

Elective 3 



16 



16 



16 



is 



"German, Russian and French are recommended. 

fThe letters A and B refer to the Core Curriculum group. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR B.S. DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

The following are required: Physics 1-2, 109-110, 225-226, 231-232, 233-234, 
241, 242, 245, 249, plus an additional 6 hours at the 200 level; Mathematics 15, 16, 
17 plus at least 6 upper-division hours subject to departmental approval (usually 
140, 257, 258); and Chemistry 15, 16. Physics 113-114 and 6-12 hours of a second 
language are strongly recommended. 



160 



Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Physics 225 3 


Physics 226 


3 


Physics 233 




3 


Physics 234 3 


Physics 231 3 


Physics 232 


3 


Physics 241 




1 


Physics 243 1 


Math. 3 


Math. 


3 


Physics 249 




1 


Physics 245 1 


2nd Language 1 3 


2nd Language 


2 3 


Physics 200 




3 


Physics 200 3 


Elective Gr. B 3 


Elective Or. B 


3 


Elective Gr. 


A 


3 


Elective Gr. A 3 


Elective 3 


Elective 


3 


Elective Cr. 
Elective 


B 


3 
3 


Elective Cr. B 3 
Elective 3 



IS 



is 



17 



17 



Laboratory Fee 

A nonrefundable fee is required of all students who take the following 
laboratory courses in Physics: 

Course Per Semester Course Per Semester 

Physics 1 $ 5.00 Physics 102 $ 5.00 

Physics 2 5.00 Physics 116 10.00 

Physics 11 5.00 Physics 257 10.00 

Courses of Instruction in Physics 

Lower Division 

1. Introductory Physics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Plane geometry and algebra. Mechanics, 
sound, heat. 

2. Introductory Physics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Physics 1. Electricity, magnetism, and 
light. 

11. General Physics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Math. 15. Not open to students who have 
credit for Introductory Physics. Mechanics, sound, and heat. 



Upper Division 

General Physics. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Physics 11, Math. 16. Not open to students 
who have credit for Introductory Physics. Light, electricity, and magnetism. 

110. Physics Problems. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Physics 1, 2; Math. 15, 16. Designed 
primarily for physics majors. 

113, 114. Introductory Electronics. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: 1 year of college 
physics. 

Photography. II. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college physics, 1 year of college chem- 
istry. The physics and chemistry of photography with practical application. 

Descriptive Meteorology. I. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college physics. Description 
of the atmosphere and its weather. Reading and analysis of weather maps. 
Weather observations. 



102. 



109, 



116. 



i 1 



118. 



124. 



Physical Meteorology. II. 3 hr. PR: Physics 117 or equiv. The physics of the 
atmosphere. Analysis of surface and upper air charts. Forecasting. 



Modern Physics for Engineers. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Physics 11, 102. Aspects of 
physics of current engineering interest. 

125, 126. Modern Physics for Engineers. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Physics 11, 102. 
Aspects of physics of current engineering interest. 

201, 202, 203, 204. Special Topics. I, II. 1-3 hr. per sem. 

213. Introductory Electronics. S. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college physics. Primarily for 
Education majors, not for graduate credit for science majors. 

218. Dynamic Meteorology. II. 3 hr. PR: Calculus, Physics 117 or equiv. Dynamics 
of lower atmosphere relating to transport and dispersion of foreign matter. 



PHYSICS 



161 



221. Optics. II. 3 hr. PR: Calculus, 1 year of college physics. Work with optical 
instruments, spectrometry, interferometry, and polarization. 

225. 226. Modern Physics. I. II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Calculus, Physics 11, 102, or 
equiv. Particle analysis, phenomena connected with the structure of the atom, 
and nucleus. Not open to those who have credit for Physics 125 and 126. 

231, 232. Theoretical Mechanics. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Calculus, Physics 11, 
102. or equiv. Theorems and problems in intermediate mechanics. 

233, 234. Introductory Electricity and Magnetism. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Cal- 
culus, Physics 11, 102. or equiv. Electrostatics, magnetostatics, introduction of 
electrodynamics, and applications. 

241, 242. Mechanics Laboratory. I. 1 hr. To supplement Physics 231, 232. 

243, 244. Electricity Laboratory. II. 1 hr. To supplement Physics 233, 234. 

245, 246. Modern Physics Laboratory. II. 1 hr. To supplement Physics 125, 126, 
or 225, 226. 

247, 248. Physics Seminar. I, II. No credit. Required of junior, senior and gradu- 
ate physics majors. 

249. Optics Laboratory. I. 1 hr. PR: Physics 11, 102 or equiv. To supplement 
Physics 221. 

251. Introductory Quantum Mechanics. II. 3 hr. PR: Physics 225, 226. An intro- 
duction to the concepts and methods of elementary quantum treatment in 
physics. 

254. Outline of Modern Physics. S. 3 hr. PR: 10 hr. college physics, 1 year college 
math. Selected topics in modern physics. Primarily for Education majors, not 
open to physics majors. 

255, 256. Workshop for Physics Teachers. SI, SII. 3 hr. PR: 1 year of college 
physics, 1 year college mathematics. Techniques of apparatus construction and 
demonstration. Primarily for Education majors, not open to physics majors. 

257. Photography. SI. 3 hr. PR: 1 year college physics or equiv. Primarily for Edu- 
cation majors, not open to physics majors. 

258. Light. SII. 3 hr. PR: 1 year college physics or equiv. Primarily for Education 
majors, not open to physics majors. 

261, 262. Molecular Physics. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Physics 225, 226. Molecular 
spectra, molecular structure. 

271, 272. Solid State Physics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Physics 225, 226, or 125, 126. 

283. Thermodynamics. I. 3 hr. PR: Calculus, Physics 11, 102 or equiv. Application 
of the fundamental law of thermodynamics to physical systems. 

284. Kinetic Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Calculus, Physics 11, 102 or equiv. Applications 
of Boltzman statistics to physical systems. 

287, 288. Introduction to Mathematical Physics. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. PR: Calculus, 
Physics 11, 102 or equiv. Boundary value problems in vibration, heat con- 
duction, introductory quantum mechanics and elasticity. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The political science curriculum provides a systematized course of study ol the 
origin, basis, and nature ol the state in its many and varied aspects. These include: 
principles, Organization, and structure ol political institutions, both domestic and 
foreign; tin processes and functioning of government; interrelationships between 
political institutions on various levels of government; political behavior; the control 
of government instrumentalities and die means for holding its agents responsible; and 

162 



the identification and analysis of public problems falling within the range of govern- 
ment. Course offerings in the Department of Political Science provide a basic general 
knowledge of the field, as well as more extensive and intensive training in the 
specialized areas of political science, particularly on the senior and graduate levels. 
Primary departmental objectives may be classified under four principal head- 
ings as follows: 

1. To develop an understanding of the role of government in modern society, 
thus contributing to a general, liberal education and to preparation of students for 
a career in the public service. 

2. To impart a basic knowledge and understanding of the techniques and pro- 
cesses of government and administration to those persons who look forward to a 
career in the public service. 

3. To provide pre-professional training for students who are preparing to 
enter the legal profession. 

4. To provide advanced and specialized instruction, through the Ph.D. degree, 
for persons who wish to enter teaching or research in the field of political science. 

The political science curriculum, therefore, enables the major in this field to 
gain an understanding of the political society in which he lives and also to plan his 
academic program so as to prepare himself for a career of public service. 

Requirements for Majors 

Hours. Undergraduate majors in political science are required to take at least 
27 hours of upper-division course work in the department. There must be a first 
minor consisting of 12 hours of upper-division courses, normally in history, econ- 
omics, sociology, or psychology and a second minor of 6 hours of upper-division 
work in a related field. 

Required Courses. Each undergraduate major is required to take Pol. Sci. 1 
(3 hr. ) or 2 (3 hr.). Departmental majors are encouraged to take both Pol. Sci. 1 
and 2. 

Distribution of Courses. The major in political science should work out his 
program in such a way as to secure a well-rounded knowledge of the field, as well as 
to concentrate in some particular area. Although the 27 hours of upper-division work 
in political science is the minimum requirement, students should take at least 33 
hours. 

The following are distribution requirements for an undergraduate major in 
political science: 

1. At least one upper-division course in each of the six groups into which the 
offerings of the department are divided. 

2. At least three upper-division courses in some one group. 



Groupings of Upper-Division Courses by Fields 

I. American National, State, and Local Government 

Pol. Sci. Ill, 113, 120, 121, 210, 211, 213, 214, 215, 216, 218, 221, 
225, 226, 310, 311, 314, 320-321, 324, 325-326. 
II. Politics and Policy Development 

Pol. Sci. 130, 231, 232, 233, 234, 330-331, 334. 

III. Public Administration 

Pol. Sci. 140, 241, 243, 244, 245, 246, 344, 346-347. 

IV. Foreign and Comparative Government 

Pol. Sci. 150, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257, 258, 259, 290, 
291, 294, 295, 351-352, 354. 
Y. International Relations, Organizations and Law 

Pol. Sci. 160, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 361-362, 364. 
VI. Political Theory 

Pol. Sci. 170. 171, 272, 273, 274, 374, 375-376. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 163 



COURSES SUGGESTED FOR POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJORS 



First 


Year 


Second 


1 Year 


First S< m. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 3 


English 2 3 


Pol. Sci. 1 3 


Pol. Sci. 2 3 


Croup A 3-4 


Group A 3-4 


Group A 2-3 


Group A 2-3 


Group C 3-4 


Group C 3-4 


Group C 3-4 


Group C (if 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


necessary to 


Phys. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. 1 


(if necessary) 


fulfill Core 


Psychol. 1 3 


Sociol. 1 or 


History 52 3 


Curriculum re- 


(or 2nd year) 


Geog. 7 or 8 3 


Phys. Ed. (\V) 1 


quirements ) 3-4 




(or 2nd year) 


Econ. 51 3 


Foreign language 3 

(if necessary) 
History 53 3 
Phys. Ed. (W) 1 
Econ. 52 3 


15-19 


15-19 


15-19 


15-19 


Third Year 


Fourth Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Pol. Sci. 200 3 


Pol. Sci. Group V 


Pol. Sci. 170 3 


Pol. Sci. 171 3 


Pol. Sci. Group I 3 


or Group IV 3 


Pol. Sci. Group II 


Electives, 


Pol. Sci. Group IV 


Pol. Sci. Group II 


or Group III 3 


minors 6-9 


or Group V 3 


or Group III 3 


Electives, 


Pol. Sci. 


Elective, minors 3 


Elective, minors 3 


minors 6-9 


electives 6-9 


Econ. 51 (if not 


Econ. 52 (if not 


Pol. Sci. 




taken prev. ) 3 


taken prev. ) 3 


electives 6-9 




Electives 3-6 


Pol. Sci. elective 3 
Electives 3-6 







18-20 



18-20 



18-21 



18-21 



Courses of Instruction in Political Science 

Lower Division 

1. Elements of Democratic Government. I, II. 3 hr. Introduction to government. 
Origin, forms, and functions of the state; organization and forms of govern- 
ment; and the relations of groups and individuals to the state. Primarily for 
freshmen. 

2. The American Federal System. I, II. 3 hr. A survey course in American 
national government. Intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores. 

I r pper Division 

101. Introduction to Government. I, II. 3 hr. (Exclusively for students in the Col- 
li ge of Agriculture and Forestry and the College of Engineering). A con- 
sideration of the basic principles and operation of national, state, and local 
government in the United States. 

111. Functions of American National Government. I, II. 3 hr. The activities of the 
executive branch of government, particularly as they relate to social and eco- 
nomic development! expansion ol government activities and services since 
L932. 

113. American Constitutional Principles. 1 3 hr. U. S. Constitution as interpreted 
by the Supreme Court. Treatment is analytical rather than historical. Text 

Supplemented l>> some leading eases. 

120. State and Local Government. I, II. 3 hr. Survey of the legal basis, .structure, 
and operation ol slate and local governments, their relations with each other 

and their place in the federal system. 



164 



121. Introduction to Urban Planning. I, II. 3 hr. Structure of urban communities; 
history, processes, and objectives of planning; trends in planning and urban 
development. 

130. Political Parties and Electoral Processes. I, II. 3 hr. The nature of political 
parties. Public regulation of parties and electoral processes. A close examina- 
tion of suffrage, nominating devices, campaign procedures, and the conduct 
of elections. 

140. Introduction to Public Administration. I, II. 3 hr. Introductory study of the 
development, organization, procedures, processes, and human relation factors 
of governmental administration in American democracy. 

150. Contemporary European Governments. I, II. 3 hr. Comparative analysis by 
countries of constitutions, political structures, and functions, with major em- 
phasis upon the United Kingdom, France, Russia, and West Germany. 

160. International Relations. I, II. 3 hr. Introduction to contemporary world poli- 
tics. Just enough background to make present-day international affairs more 
understandable. 

170. History of Political Thought: Plato to Machiavelli. I. 3 hr. Examination of 
major political ideas from the Greeks to sixteenth century with special em- 
phasis upon development of natural law and western conception of justice. 

171. History of Political Thought: Machiavelli to Bentham. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 
170 or consent. Analysis of the political ideas which developed from the 
separation of faith and reason, the culmination of this movement in rational 
integral liberalism, and the origins of modern conservatism as expounded by 
Edmund Burke. 

200. Research Materials and Techniques in Political Science. I. 3 hr. Basic source 
materials in political science and of the techniques and methods of govern- 
mental research. 

210. American Political Institutions. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 2 or consent. Develop- 
ment of the Constitution, Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court 
as institutions with special attention to current problems and issues. 

211. Problems of American National Government. II. 3 hr. This course is intended 
to give recognition to the major contemporary problems of government. Ex- 
tensive readings of background materials as well as current literature. 

213. American Constitutional Law. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 2 or consent. Basic prin- 
ciples of American constitutional law as developed through interpretation 
with special emphasis on constitutional theories and national development. 

214. Civil Rights and Liberties in the United States. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 213 or 
consent. Scope and meaning of civil liberty guarantees in the United States 
Constitution, as illustrated by cases involving original constitutional provisions, 
the federal Bill of Rights, and Civil War Amendments (with special attention 
to the rule of law; free speech, press, religion, assembly, and petition; per- 
sonal security; racial discrimination; and the labor problem). 

215. American Constitutional Development I. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 2 or consent. 
A survey of American constitutional development, with special emphasis on 
the origins of constitutionalism here; liberty vs. government; mixed govern- 
ment: separation of powers; the problem of federalism and the Philadelphia 
Convention of 1787; the Marshall court and establishment of judicial review; 
Federalisl vs. States Rights; construction of the Constitution; Jacksonian in- 
fluences: the Taney Court prelude to the Civil War. secession, and conflict. 
heralding constitutional change. 

216. American Constitutional Development II. II. 3 hi. PR: Pol. Sci. 2, 215 or 
consent. Continuation of a survey in American constitutional development, 
with special attention to Reconstruction, the Supreme Court, and the Four- 

POLITICAL SCIEXCE 165 



teenth Amendment; laissez-faire and the commerce clause; stirrings of reform 
toward a constitutional revolution under the New Deal; changing federal- 
state relationships; the impact of war upon constitutional interpretation; an 
expanding role for the president in domestic matters and foreign relations; 
the Warren Court and triumph for libertarian activists over judicial restrain- 
ts in an era of civil liberties. 

218. Government and Business. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 2 or consent. Government 
regulations ol the economy dealing with the origin and development of public 
politics, constitutional and policies basis of regulation, relationships between 
political and economic institutions and processes, and an evaluation of the 
consequences of regulatory policies. 

221. West Virginia Government and Administration. I, II. 3 hr. The organization 
and operation of the state government of West Virginia. 

225. Municipal Government. II. 3 hr. Legal basis, structure, operation, and prob- 
lems of municipal government and municipal relations with other govern- 
mental units. 

22(1 Problems of State and Local Government. I. 3 hr. Current problems of state, 
county, and municipal governments. Students are expected to have completed 
Pol. Sci. 120 or its equiv. 

231. History of Political Parties. I. 3 hr. The growth of political parties in the 
United States. Analysis of issues in presidential campaigns as they relate to 
political party development. 

232. Public Opinion and Propaganda. II. 3 hr. Techniques of sampling and measur- 
ing public opinion; detection of propaganda; the nature of propaganda and 
methods of the propagandist. 

233. Current Political Issues. I. 3 hr. Political party platforms and the major issues 
of the political campaign. Students will be expected to examine background 
materials thoroughly. 

234. The Legislative Process. II. 3 hr. Structure and organization of legislative 
bodies. Power of legislature. Detailed study of lawmaking procedures. The 
influence of outside forces. 

241. Administrative Organization and Management. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 140 or 
consent. Analysis of governmental administrative organization and reorganiza- 
tion and of such management functions as leadership, planning, coordination, 
and financial organization. 

243. Public Personnel Administration. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 140 or consent. A 
survey of public personnel administration with particular attention to the 
merit system concept, career staffing, classification and salary administration, 
selection, manpower utilization, training, the rights and duties of employees 
and the relationship between management and personnel specialists. Emphasis 
is given to psychological and human relations aspects of the work situation 
with attention to role and status, motivation, leadership, employee relations, 
and supervisor- subordinate interaction. 

244. Administrative Law and Regulations. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 140 or consent. 
Study of the law of administration, primarily by the case method, covering 
administrative powers, procedure in administrative adjudication and rule- 
making, discretion, judicial control, and administrative liability. 

245. Public Administration and Polio Development. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 140 or 
consent. Analysis of decision-making and policy development in the admin- 
istrative process l>y the case method. 

246. Comparative Public Administration. II. 3 In. The theory and practice of pub- 
lic administration in diverse cultures and national political systems. 

166 



250. Comparative Government. I. 3 hr. Comparative study of modern political 
institutions with particular attention to European constitutional government 
and politics. 

251. Modern Dictatorships. II. 3 hr. Politically undemocratic governments. Pro- 
vides background of dictatorship generally, followed by treatment of several 
modern dictatorships. 

252. British Government and Politics. I. 3 hr. Intensive study of British government 
with emphasis upon both internal and external policies, primarily during the 
twentieth century. 

253. The Commonwealth of Nations. II. 3 hr. Analysis of the political relationships 
between the members of the Commonwealth and a comparative study of the 
governments of the Dominions with particular reference to Canada and Aus- 
tralia. 

254. Governments of Asia. I. 3 hr. Contemporary politics and governments of Asia. 

255. Governments of Latin America. I. 3 hr. Comparative study of the major 
nations of Latin America. 

256. Governments of the Middle East. II. 3 hr. The governments and political 
forces of the Middle East. 

257. Governments of Southeast Asia. II. 3 hr. Survey of political institutions and 
governmental processes of the Southeast Asian countries with a special em- 
phasis on the analysis of contemporary political problems of the governments 
surveyed. 

258. Politics of Africa. I. 3 hr. A survey of the historical legacies and current 
political processes of tropical African countries designed primarily for 
secondary-level social studies teachers who are pursuing graduate training. 

259. Political Tour of Europe. 6 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 1 and 2 or consent. Examination 
of governments and politics in selected European countries. Lectures and dis- 
cussions supplement observation while visiting these countries. 

261. International Organization. I. 3 hr. Emphasis will be placed upon agencies 
created since the close of World War II. Some reference to development of 
international law and League of Nations. 

262. Specialized Agencies of the United Nations. II. 3 hr. A detailed treatment of 
the specialized agencies and related institutions. 

263. Public International Law. I. 3 hr. Law governing relations among nations, 
including development of rules, means of enforcement, and conflicts between 
theory and practice. 

264. Conduct of American Foreign Relations. I. 3 hr. Basic concepts about and 
factors influencing the decision-making process and the conduct of L T nited 
States foreign policy, with special attention to the problems of ends and 
means of democracy, pressure interest groups (i.e., the military-industrial com- 
plex and the administrative bureaucracy); recent theories, analytical tools, and 
methodology in the problem areas of conflict-resolution, nonconsensus situa- 
tions, and inter-nation influence; regional patterns, problems, and prospects 
of United States policy in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the 
Soviet bloc since 1945. 

265. Basic Factors in Power Politics. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 2 or consent. Analysis 
of factors of power in the nation-state system. Evaluation of nationalism and 
concepts of national interest in modem world politics. 

266. Soviet Foreign Policy. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 150 or 160 or consent. Basic con- 
cepts about and factors influencing choice in the formulation and execution 
of Soviet foreign policy; the development and present patterns in Soviet 

foreign relations with key states and the United Nations; possible problems 
and prospects in future Soviet relations. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE lh7 



267. Latin America in International Affairs. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 160 or 255 or 
consent. A survey of the relations of Latin American states among themselves, 
to the United States of America, to the United Nations, to other regional 
organizations, and to non-Western states. Analyzed in depth are the Monroe 
Doctrine and its corollaries, and the Inter-American system. 

268. Inter-State Conflict in International Affairs. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 160 or con- 
sent. The Study of conflict in interstate relations, in particular armed conflict 
between nations. Attention to the role of force, the impact of modern tech- 
nology and nuclear weaponry, theoretical and research approaches to the 
causes and nature of conflict, and different modes of conflict control and 
resolution. 

272. Recent and Contemporary Political Thought. I. 3 hr. Integral liberalism and 
the forces leading to the decline of liberalism and a critical analysis of the 
fascist and communist ideologies with their threat to the traditions of western 
civilization embodied in Christianity and conservatism. 

273. American Political Theory. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 171 or consent. Major 
political ideas and their influence upon American society and government 
from the seventeenth century to the present. 

274. Problems in Contemporary Political Thought. II. 3 hr. An intensive study of 
current trends in political thought through examination of the works of con- 
temporary writers. 

290. Socio-Politics of Africa. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 1, 2, three hours of comparative 
government and three hours of sociology or anthropology, or consent. A com- 
parative inquiry into political behavior and its social bases in tropical Africa, 
with particular reference to eastern and central Africa. 

291. Leadership and Authority in Africa. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 1, 2, three hours 
of comparative government and three hours of sociology or anthropology, or 
consent. A comparative study of traditional, colonial, and contemporary 
political leadership and authority patterns in Africa south of the Sahara. 

294. The Theory of Political Development. I. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 1, 2, three hours 
of comparative government and three hours of sociology or anthropology, or 
consent. A survey of contemporary theories concerning political change and 
the relationship of political change to economic and technological develop- 
ment, with particular reference to the new nations. 

295. The Politics of Planned Development. II. 3 hr. PR: Pol. Sci. 294 or consent. 
A comparative study of the political aspects of directed economic and tech- 
nological change, with special reference to the politics of national develop- 
ment planning and the development process. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Courses in psychology are designed for one or more of the following ends: to 
convey flic principles, methods, and theories necessary for a better understanding of 
human and animal behavior; to provide a preparation for graduate professional 
training; and to provide training in the scientific methodology and substantive con- 
Not required by users oi psychological knowledge and technology in the applied 
social sciences. 

The emphasis ol pre-professional undergraduate training in psychology i^ 
placed on broad education in the behavioral, biological, physical, and social sciences, 
and the humanities. During the first two years the student will meet most of the 
genera] requirements of the University and of the College of Arts and Sciences, lb- 
will also take Psychology 1. 2, and 111. and two courses from the group including 
Psychology 121. 122, and L23. During the junior and senior years ho will complete 
the work of Ins major and minor and round out his education through eloctivos. Ex- 
cessive specialization in psycholog) is discouraged for students who intend to pursue 

168 



professional training in psychology at the graduate level. A strong major, however, is 
recommended for students who do not intend to continue their education beyond 
the Bachelor's Degree. 

Laboratory Fee 

A nonrefundable laboratory fee of $8.00 is required of students who take 
Psychology 122. 

('nurses of Instruction in Psychology 
Lower Division 
l/l. Introduction to Psychology. I, II, S. 3 hr. Survey of general psychology. 

2. Introduction to Experimental Psychology. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Lectures, 
demonstrations, and laboratory exercises in sensory processes, perception, 
learning. 

Upper Division 

101. Leadership and Human Relations. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Leadership 

training, motivation and morale, human relations, safety, industry, and society. 

111. Statistical Methods in Psychology. I and II. hr. PR: Psych. 1. Analysis and 
interpretation of psychological data. Open to psychology and sociology majors 
who are concurrently enrolled in Statistics 101. 

121. Intermediate Experimental Psychology. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Principles 
of experimental method, psychophysics and sensory processes surveyed at 
intermediate level. 

122. Introduction to Conditioning and Learning. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Lectures 
and lab. Principles of learning surveyed at intermediate level. Lab exercises 
and demonstrations. 

123. Learning and Thinking. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. An introduction to com- 
plex human behavior with emphasis upon the processes underlying learning 
and cognition. Special attention is accorded the mechanisms of memory, lan- 
guage, verbal behavior, and conceptual processes. 

141. Introduction to Human Development. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. An intro- 
duction to concepts, theories and methods of studying human development 
throughout the entire life cycle. 

151. Introduction to Social Psychology. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Social factors which 
determine human behavior. The relationship of class, race, culture, social 
structure and other group phenomena to individual behavior. Other topics in- 
clude: attitudes, public opinion, propaganda, mass media of information and 
national character. 

164. Personal and Social Adjustment. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1. Applications of 
material from personality, abnormal, clinical and social psychology to the 
problems of achieving positive personality change. 

202. Job Analysis. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 203 or consent. Instruction and super- 
vised practice in the preparation of job analyses and in the use of occupational 
descriptions. Especially designed for students in psychology, guidance, engi- 
neering, management, and rehabilitation counseling. 

203. Personnel Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 and Statistics 101 or equiv. 
Application of psychological principles and techniques to the problems of 
measurement and prediction of proficiency in industry and society. Includes 
discussion of proficiency measurement, personnel selection by tests and inter- 
views, conditions of work and productivity, engineering psychology, work 
methods and safety. 

211. Statistical Methods in Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Statistics 101 or equiv. 
Sampling theory, probability, further parametric and non-parametric statistics. 
(Equivalent to Statistics 211). 

PSYCHOLOGY 169 



212. History of Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology. Traces the de- 
velopment of the concepts of psychology from their origins in philosophy and 
medicine up to the modern era. 

213. Directed Studies. I, II, S. 1-3 hi. per sem. PR: Consent. 

214. Theory of Tests and Measurement. I or II, S. 3 hr. PR: Statistics 101 or con- 
sent. Theory underlying psychological scaling, mathematical models, classical 
ps\ chometrics; includes introduction to concepts of reliability, validity, cor- 
relation and regression, multivariate analysis procedures. 

215. Analysis of Variance. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 211 or consent. A discussion 
of tests of homogeneit} <>i variance, parametric and non-parametric analysis of 
variance, and analysis of covariance. Implications of these techniques for ex- 
perimental design will be considered. (Equivalent to Statistics 212). 

217. Multivariate Analysis. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 214 or Statistics 211 or con- 
sent. Correlational methods in psychology with application to typical research 
problems. Includes simple matrix algebra, multiple correlation, discriminant 
analysis, and an introduction to factor analysis. (Equivalent to Statistics 241). 

219. Survey of Psychology. I. 1 hr. PR: Junior standing. Survey of fields of psychol- 
ogy. For juniors and seniors preparing for professional graduate training in 
psychology. 

221. Sensory Processes. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 121. Psychophysics of vision and 

audition are analyzed and related to current theories. Methods of research in 
sensory processes are reviewed. 

223. Perceptual and Cognitive Processes. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 121 or 123. Con- 
sideration of classical and contemporary research and theory on perception 
and cognitive processes, including concept formation and thinking. 

224. Motivation. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 122 or 123. Survey of experimental data 
and theory in the area of motivation and its relation to learning. 

227. Conditioning and Learning. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 122 or 123. Outline of 
current research in operant and classical conditioning. Controversial issues in 
learning are reviewed in light of recent research and theory. 

231. Physiological Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 121 and Zool. 271 or 
equiv. The organic basis for psychological activities such as perception, emo- 
tion, motivation, and learning. 

232. Comparative Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 121 or 122. Ontogenetic 
and phylogenetic development of representative species in relation to differ- 
ences in behavior. 

241. Advanced Developmental Psychology. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 141 and 214 
or equiv. Research methods and substantive findings in the psychology of 
human development from birth to death, emphasizing developmental processes 
occurring over the entire life span. 

243. Child Behavior. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology or graduate standing. 
Growtli trends in behavior through adolescence, including development in the 
physical, intellectual, emotional, social, and personality areas. 

247. Adolescence and Early Adulthood. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 141, 263 and 281 
or equiv., or consent. Psychosexual, psychosocial, and other focal problems of 

development are stressed. The role of high school and higher education in 
growtli and development is examined. 

252. Group Dynamics. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. L51 and consent. Psychological 
approaches to the dynamics operating in groups. Topics treated include: 
Leadership, informal communication and group processes, the relation of group 
aims to group organization, and the effeel ol the group on personality. 

170 



253. Attitudes and Propaganda. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 151. The nature of atti- 
tudes and opinions, attitude measurement, opinion changes, propaganda use 
and analysis, the social psychology of mass media. Designed for students in 
psychology, sociology, political science and journalism. 

261. Individual Differences. I or II. 3 hr. PR: One course in psychology. Nature 
and extent of differences among individuals in such traits as intelligence, 
achievement, personality, and interests as affected by hereditary and environ- 
mental differences and by such variables as schooling, socioeconomic status, 
sex, age, and race. Primarily for students of psychology and education. 

262. Group Psychometric Testing. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Statistics 101 or equiv., 9 hr. 
of psychology or graduate standing. Theory underlying the construction and 
use of psychometric measurement techniques for evaluating aptitudes, inter- 
ests, attitudes, and other personality characteristics. 

263. Introduction to Personality. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology or graduate 
standing. The development and significance of the personality concept in 
psychology including a survey of the major theories such as psychoanalytic, 
interpersonal, trait, and learning. 

264. Psychology of Adjustment. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology or graduate 
standing. Dynamic principles of human personality adjustment. 

271. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. I or S. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 263 or 281 or 
consent. A review of concepts, techniques and professional roles in clinical 
psychology. Of interest to advanced undergraduates and graduates in educa- 
tion, guidance, personnel, pre-medicine, and social work, as well as pro- 
fessionally oriented students in psychology. 

281. Abnormal Psychology. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology or graduate 
standing. A survey of the major behavioral disorders— neurosis, psychosis, and 
character disorders. Emphasis is placed on the developmental dynamics lead- 
ing to these disorders, and the psychological treatment thereof. 

282. Exceptional Children. I or II. 3 hr. PR: 9 hr. of psychology including Psych. 
141 or equiv. or graduate standing. Study of children who present psycho- 
logical problems because of exceptional mental retardation or advancement; 
organic disabilities having behavioral consequences, such as cerebral palsy or 
deafness; disorders of conduct associated with a typical personality function- 
ing. Of special interest to those who regularly deal with children, such as 
teachers, guidance counselors and nurses. 



RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

100. Introduction to the Gospels. I. 3 hr. A study of the four Gospels of the New 
Testament, involving a brief introduction to the literature and historical set- 
ting of the Gospels with an intensive study of the Christ event. 

101. A Study of Paul. II. 3 hr. An introduction to the life and theology of Paul, 
involving a study of the letters of Paul and other pertinent early Christian 
literature. 

102. Introduction to the Old Testament. I. 3 hr. A brief introduction to Old Testa- 
ment literature, its historical background, its great personalities, and the 
development of beliefs and customs of importance both to Jews and to Chris- 
tians. The development of Israel and her theology will be traced up to the 
eighth century B.C. 

103. Introduction to the Old Testament. II. 3 hr. A brief introduction to Old 
Testament literature, its historical background, its great personalities, and the 
development of beliefs and customs of importance both to Jews and to Chris- 
tians. The development of Israel and her theology will be traced from the 
eighth century B.C. until the time of Christ. 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 171 



120. Historj of Christian Thought. I. 3 hr. A study of significant men and move- 
ments ol thought among the Christians and ol the way in which these con- 
tributed to answering the perennial questions of religion from a Christian 
perspective. The course will cover the historj ol Christian thought to 1500. 

L21. Ilistor> of Christian Thought. II. 3 hr. A study of significant men and move- 
ments of thought among the Christians and of the way in which these con- 
tributed to answering the perennial questions of religion from a Christian 
perspective. The course will cover the history ol Christian thought from 1500 
to the present time. 

150. Sophomore Honors Course in Religious Studies. 3 hr. Open only to honors 

students. A stud\ of fundamental tenets of Judaism and Christianity; also an 
introduction to their Scriptures, their origin and growth as well as certain 
problems contained in them. The course will constantly strive to show the 
contemporary relevance of each topic discussed. Readings from great Christian 
and Jewish thinkers of all ages will be assigned weekly. 

210. Problems in Contemporary Judaeo-Christian Thinking. I. 3 hr. PR: A 100 

Religious Studies course or consent. Problems to be treated include the fol- 
lowing: the function of reason in the Judaeo-Christian faith and the relation- 
ship of reason and revelation to each other; the Judaeo-Christian under- 
standing of history; a selected topic. 

211. Problems in Contemporary Judaeo-Christian Thinking. II. 3 hi. PR: A 100 

Religious Studies course or consent. Problems to be treated include the fol- 
lowing: the ecumenical movement within the Church; the Spirit; recent trans- 
formations in ethical and social thinking (new morality); secular theology 
now theology). 

212. Judaeo-Christian Teachings About the Problems of Man. I. 3 hr. PR: Either 
a 100 Religious Studies course or consent. A presentation of the dialog be- 
tween the existential problems of man, e.g., anxiety, loneliness, meaningless- 
ness, guilt, death, lust, wrath, and others, and the response of the Judaeo- 
Christian faith. The course embraces an introduction to existential theology. 

220. History of American Religion: 1607-1820. I. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies 
course or consent. A study of the origins, growth, and influence of the major 
religious ideas and movements which were significant in the shaping of the 
religious life of the American people in the colonial and early federal periods. 

221. History of American Religion: 1820 to Date. II. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious 
Studies course or consent. A study of the origins, growth, and influence of the 
major religious ideas and movements which have been significant in the 
shaping ol the religious life of the American people since 1820. 

223. Roman Catholic Thought: From the Council of Trent to Vatican Council II. 

II. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or consent Roman Catholic 
thinkers and movements in doctrinal, biblical, historical, and social thought: 
the reform and renewal movement ol Vatican Council II; the role of Roman 
Catholicism in contemporary society. 

224. Christian Thought in the Reformation Era. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies 
course or consent. A study ol the significant men and movements in the four 
primar) streams <>l sixteenth centur) Christian thought in western Europe: 
Protestantism, radical Christianity, Roman Catholicism, and Anglicanism. 

226. Early Medieval Theology and Culture. I. 3 hr PR: A 100 Religious Studies 
course <u consent. A stud) ol the primar) ways in which early medieval 

Christian thought responded to the cultural heritage of the West. Major con- 
sideration will be given to the rise ol (he medieval synthesis of theology and 

culture. 

227 Late Medieval Theology and Culture. II. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies 
course "i consent. A stud) ol the medieval theological, philosophical, cultural 

172 



synthesis in the period A.D. 1200-1450. Emphasis will fall upon such topics 
as the rise of the universities, papal absolutism, mendicant orders and con- 
ciliarism in theological perspective. 

230. World Religions: Religions of India. I. 3 hr. Proto-Indian religion, Hinduism, 
the beginnings of Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism; historical and theological 
foundations; developments of thought; contemporary expressions and en- 
counter with the modern world. 

231. World Religions: Religions of China and Japan. II. 3 hr. Buddhism, Con- 
fucianism, Taoism, Shinto: historical and theological foundations; develop- 
ments of thought: contemporary expressions and encounters with the modem 
world. 

232. World Religions: Zoroastrianism, Islam, and Modern Syncretisms. I. 3 hr. An 
investigation of the historical and theological foundations and the subsequent 
development of Zoroastrianism, Islam, and modern attempts at syncretism 
such as Soka (iakkai and Baha'i. 

233. Comparative Religions. II. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or con- 
sent. A comparison of the answers given by the major contemporary religions 
to questions concerning the nature of the absolute, man, sin, salvation, and 
the good life. 

240. Theology and Culture. I. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or consent. 
An interdisciplinary course involving members of various parts of the faculty 
of the University in dialog with a professor of religious studies. The dialog 
will he carried on with the humanities and the arts. 

241. Theology and Culture. II. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or consent. 
An interdisciplinary course involving members of various parts of the faculty 
of the University in dialog with a professor of religious studies. The dialog 
will he carried on with science and technology. 

290. Seminar: Selected Topic. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or consent. 
Seminar: Selected Topic. 

291. Seminar: Selected Topic. 3 hr. PR: A 100 Religious Studies course or consent. 
Seminar: Selected Topic. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 

1, 2. Introductory' General Course. I, II. 3 hr. per sem. The interdisciplinary course 
in social science aids the student in his preparation for citizenship by ad- 
vancing his understanding of the social order. In the first semester the con- 
cepts and forms of organization pertinent to economics, political science, and 
sociology are treated. In the second semester these social sciences are applied 
to the anal\ sis of problem conditions such as economic dislocations and pov- 
erty, race relations and civil rights, and international relations. Three lectures 
and one optional discussion group per week. 



SOCIOLOGY 

An undergraduate major in sociology provides basic preparation for teaching 
the social sciences in high school and for professional careers in social work and other 
fields involving interpersonal relations. Students completing the undergraduate major 
in sociology are well equipped to enter graduate study in the discipline. 

A major in sociology normally consists of 24 hours of upper-division courses 
including as a rule Sociology 202: Introduction to Social Research; Sociology 246; 
Types of Sociological Theory, and a course in basic statistics. 

A student planning to major in sociology normally elects Sociology 1 during 
his freshman year and Sociology 51 and 104 during his sophomore year. 

SOCIOLOGY 173 



Courses of Instruction in Sociology 

/ •lit r Division 

1. Introduction to Sociology. I. II. 3 hr. Basic concepts; fundamental institutions 
and functions of society. 

2. Introduction to Sociology, (Continued). II. 3 hr. A continuation of Sociol. 1 
for students in the Honors Program. (Not open to other students.) The appli- 
cation of sociological principles to the analysis of selected aspects of Ameri- 
can social life. 

51. Introduction to Anthropology. I, II. 3 hi. Introductory survey of the field of 
anthropology, with emphasis on the nature of culture. Behavior ot man illus- 
trated by the simpler societies. 

52. Introduction to Anthropology. II. 3 hr. PR: Sociol. 51 or consent. Stress will 
be placed on the effects of conflict on the relation of the individual to the 
group in varying cultural contexts. For students in the Honors Program. 



Upper Division 

Prerequisites for Sociology courses in the "200" series: Sociol. 1 or 51, or 
Social Sci. 1, 2 (or equivalents). 

104. Social Problems. I, II. 3 hr. Examinations, within a sociological framework 
of such topics as labor-management relations, social class conflict, family dis- 
organization and parent-child relations, race relations, juvenile delinquency 
and crime, religious adjustment, and social planning. 

190. Man and Food. (Same as Agriculture 190). I. 3 hr. An exploration on a global 
basis of the interactions between man and his environment as reflected in his 
lood supply and in turn the development and maintenance ol his social and 
political institutions. 

202. Introduction to Social Research. I, II. 3 hr. Trends in social research; exami- 
nation of methods and techniques. 

205. Urban Sociology. II. 3 hr. Sociological analysis of institutional structure. 
social values, and individual goals in urban-industrial society, bureaucratiza- 
tion, collectivization, and mass culture; emphasis on political, economic, re- 
ligious, and family institutions. 

206. Sociology of Rural Life. II. 3 hr. Social aspects of rural living. Character- 
istics of rural population, social structure, and institutional arrangements: 
family, community, education, religion, recreation, health, welfare, and local 
government. 

207. Principles of Community Development. 3 hr. PR: Sociol. 1 or consent. An 
"applied" course in which principles and techniques ol community organiza- 
tion and development arc organized. 

208. The Community. S. 3 hr. An analytical course intended chiefly to provide 
background data lor students interested in programs ol community action. 
Topics to be included are: the basic characteristics ol communities; com- 
munity institutions and resources; social cleavages within the community; and 
community sni\e> and community planning. 

210. The Family. I. II. 3 hr. Sociological analysis ol tin contemporarj family and 
its problem! 

211. Sociology of Childhood. II. '1 In. Adjustment ol child to American culture. 
210. Sociology of Education. (Same as Educ. 210). I. II. 3 hr. An examination of 

education as a social institution: cultural and (lass influences on education: 
SOCial roles and career patterns in the school system: the school and prob- 
lem^ ol the communitj . 

174 



218. The Sociology of Economic Life. 3 lir. PR: Sociol. 1 or consent. Economic 
behavior is examined in the context of the social environment. The interaction 
of selected social-psychological variables with economic motivation and be- 
havior is examined. Attention is given to occupational selection, work careers, 
the changing meaning of work, effects of unemployment and downward mo- 
bility upon the individual, and criteria of employability. 

220. Social Change. I. 3 hr. Sociological analysis of the major changes now going 
on in our society, of the forces underlying them, and of the tensions to winch 
they give rise. Alternative future directions; rational manipulation and plan- 
ning for social change. 

224. Social Stratification. I. 3 hr. Description and analysis of various types of 
stratification systems such as class and caste; social mobility, and status- 
striving. The course emphasizes the place of status, prestige, and power in 
the structure of American society. 

229. Population and Migration. I. 3 hr. Population theories, growth, composition, 
and distribution of American population; immigration and culture pluralism; 
internal migrations and their consequences. 

231. Race Relations. I. 3 hr. Race relations in the U.S. with emphasis on the 
American Negro. 

233. Criminology. I. 3 hr. Explanation of crime; critical study of criminal justice, 
penal methods, and reform movements. 

234. Juvenile Delinquency. II. 3 hr. A scientific study of the nature, extent, and 
causes of delinquency in the United States. Methods of treatment, correction, 
and prevention, with emphasis on the work of the juvenile courts. 

235. Collective Behavior. I. 3 hr. Analysis of new group formation and behavior 
following social dislocation, social unrest, crowd behavior, and other forms of 
social contagion; the public and public opinion; social movements. 

244. Culture and Personality. II. 3 hr. Significant interrelations between the in- 
dividual and his culture. 

246. Types of Sociological Theory. I, II. 3 hr. Examination of leading schools of 
sociological thought in our day. 

250. Human Relations in Industry. II. 3 hr. The sociology of industrial relations. 
The factory or business firm as a social system. Formal and informal relations 
within the plant. 

260. Complex Organizations. II. 3 hr. A sociological analysis of large-scale organi- 
zations emphasizing their structure and functions. The course will examine 
the place in contemporary society of such organizations as the military, pris- 
ons, and hospitals. 

265. The Sociology of Latin America. II. 3 hr. A systematic sociological considera- 
tion of the problem of "underdeveloped" countries, with special emphasis on 
the culture, social structure, and national character of Latin American coun- 
tries. The main focus will be on social change. 

270. Group Dynamics. (Same as Psych. 252.) I. 3 hr. An interdepartmental course, 
combining psychological and sociological approaches, in which the dynamics 
of groups in operation are considered. 

275. Cultural Dynamics. I. 3 hr. The nature of culture and cultural change. His- 
torical trends in the study of cultural dynamics: focal interests, doctrines, and 
methods of study. 

276. Cross-Cultural Studies in Development. II. 3 hr. Comparative study of the 
processes of change in societies in the early stages of industrialization. 

SOCIOLOGY 175 



27 s. Anthropology of Religion. II. 3 hr. An overview o£ the nature and variety of 
human religious systems with emphasis on examples from non-WYstern cul- 
tures. The functions, development, and change in systems of religious belief 
and practice illustrated with ethnographic materials. 

281. African Society and Culture. II. 3 hr. Analysis of contemporary societies and 
cultures south of the Sahara, with some emphasis on current changes. 

282. Latin-American Society and Culture. II. 3 hr. A survey of the Post-Conquest 
societies and cultures, with emphasis on present-day sociocultural arrange- 
ments. 

285. Introduction to Archaeology. I. 3 hr. Survey of archaeology: its methods and 
significance for the understanding of prehistoric cultures. 

286. Archaeology of Appalachia. II. 3 hr. Intensive study of the content, distribu- 
tion, sequence, and significance of early Appalachian Indian cultures. 

2 l l(>. Special Topics in Anthropology. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Tutorial or seminar for 
selected strongly qualified students. 



SPEECH 

The curriculum of the Department of Speech is so organized that a student 
may receive basic training in the theory, as well as the cultural and practical aspects 
<>t any one or more of the three fields of speech: (1) rhetoric and public address; 
(2) radio, television, and motion pictures; (3) general speech and the teaching of 
speech. 

Major Requirements: The minimum number of hours in speech for a major is 
36 semester hours of credit, including the following required courses: Speech 10, 31, 
34, 80, 120, 121, and SPA 250. Electivcs taken in addition to these required courses 
must be upper-division courses and may represent concentration in one field or an 
appropriate distribution in all fields. A total of 42 semester hours in speech may be 
counted toward graduation. 

Forensic Activities. Intramural and intercollegiate forensics, including debati . 
oratory, and extemporaneous speaking, receive due attention. Speech tournaments, as 
well as campus and television debates, are included in the program. Participation in 
the activities may lead to membership in Delta Sigma Rho-Tau Kappa Alpha, forensic 
honor society. 

Radio, Television, Film Programs. Faculty-directed programs in radio, tele- 
vision, and motion pictures offer students opportunity to participate in productions 
which utilize studio facilities both on the campus and in cooperating commercial 
stations in the area. The Department of Speech lias a complete range of motion pic- 
ture equipment, including Super 8 mm, 16 mm, and 35 mm (Hollywood-type) 
cameras. 



SUGGESTED DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES FOR A.B. DEGREE IN SPEECH 
(The University Core Curriculum requirements to be observed and included.) 



/ list Seta. 
English 1 

s< him e 



First Year 

Hr. Second S< 



3 
4 

Foreign language 3 
Speech 10 3 

Speech 31 3 

Phys. Ed. 1 



m. Hr. 

English 2 3 

Science 4 
Foreign language 3 

Speech 34 3 
Psych. I 

Phys. Ed. 1 



Second 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Foreign language 3 


Foreign language 3 


Science 1 


1 listen 52 or 53 3 


Pol. Sci. 1 3 


Pol. Sci. 2 3 


English bit. 3 


English bit. 3 


Speech so 3 


Speech 120 3 


Phys. I'd. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



17 



17 



17 



16 



176 



RHETORIC AND PUBLIC ADDRESS CURRICULUM 



First Sem. 
Speech 121 
Speech 125 
Hist. 53 or 153 
English 129 
Core or other 
Electives to 

Recommended 

Electives: 
English 111 
Psych. 101 
Philos. 104 



Third Year 
Hr. Second Sem. 



Fourth Year 



Speech 121 
SPA 250 
Joum. 212 
Core or other 
Electives to 

Recommended 

Elect iv es: 
English 228 
Philos. 108 
Hist. 154 



Hr. 
3 
3 
3 



First Sem. 
Speech 220 
Speech 223 
Psych. 151 
Electives to 



Recommended 

Electives: 
Hist. 291 
Pol. Sci. 232 
Sociol. 224 



Hr. 

3 
3 
3 
9 



Second Sem. Hr. 
Speech 270 3 

Speech Elective 3 
Electives to 9 



Recommended 
Electives: 

Sociol. 235 

Psych. 252, 253 



RADIO, TELEVISION, AND FILM CURRICULUM 





Third 


Year 


Fourtl 


i Year 


First Sem. 
Speech 181 
Speech 182 
Speech 184 
Core or other 
elect. 


Hr. 
3 
3 
3 

7-9 


Second Sem. Hr. 
Speech 189 3 
SPA 250 3 
Speech 185 3 
Core or other 
elect. 7-9 


First Sem. Hr. 

Speech 282 3 
Speech 283 3 
Electives 7-12 


Second Sem. Hr. 
Speech 280 3 
Speech 284 3 
Electives 9-12 


Recommended 
Electives: 




Recommended 
Electives: 


Recommended 

Electives: 


Recommended 
Electives: 


Speech 89 

Drama 50, 75, 102 

Joum. 182, 286 


Journ. 18, 182, 281 
Drama 103, 180 


Speech 221 
Journ. 243, 289 
Drama 104, 281 


Speech 223 
Journ. 282, 288 
Drama 150, 176 



GENERAL SPEECH AND TEACHING OF SPEECH CURRICULA 

In consultation with the chairman of the department, programs in General 
Speech and the Teaching of Speech are structured to fit the specific needs and career 
goals of each student following these curricula. Those students seeking certification 
in elementary or secondary education must also fulfill the requirements of the College 
of Human Resources and Education. 

Courses of Instruction 

Lower Division 

3. Voice and Diction. I. II, S. 3 hr. Three class meetings per week, one lecture, 
two programmed-laboratories. Theoretical basis for attitudes and standards to 
proper speech, general problems of voice and diction, including individual 
analyses. Students are acquainted with special problems in the voice sciences 
and arts of breath control, tone production, resonance, and connected dis- 
course. Emphasis is placed upon the desirability of a strong, flexible, resonant 
voice for clarity of communication. The phonetic approach to speech is used 
to analyze and to remedy diction problems. Voices are regularly tape-recorded, 
with corrective exercises provided through a programmed-laboratory method. 
Not open to Speech Majors. 

10. Communication in a Democratic Society. I, II. 3 hi. The nature, psychology, 
process and effects of communication in its various forms in our society. Open 
to all students. Required of those majoring in Speech. 



SPEECH 



11. Principles of Oral Communication. I, II, S. 3 hr. Intensive braining and prac- 
tice in the fundamentals ol oral communication, with particular emphasis on 
public speaking. Attention to developing and organizing speeches, gaining 
audience attention, holding interest, and the principles oi delivery for more 
effective informative and persuasive communication. (Not open to majors in 
Speech, Speech Pathology and Audiology, or Education. See Speech 34.) 

31. Basic Speech Skills. I, II. 3 hr. Required of and limited to Speech, Drama. 
Speech Pathology and Audiology, and Education majors. The phonetic ap- 
proach to language. Improvement in clarity, audibility, variety, vocal quality, 
and correct use of language. Emphasis upon the development oi vocal skills 
in effective communication of itleas and feelings. 

1. Basic Speech Skills. I, II. 3 hr. Required of and limited to Speech majors. 
Study of and practice in extemporaneous speaking. Integration of the spoken 
word, voice, and action for accurate communication of ideas and feelings. 
Stress upon selection, organization, and presentation of materials in effective 
oral language. 

60. Junior Varsity Debate. I. 1-2 hr. PR: Consent. Intercollegiate debate training 
and participation preparatory to varsity debate team competition. Open to 
freshmen and sophomores who wish to take part in intercollegiate debating. 

61. Junior Varsity Debate. II. 1-2 hr. PR: Consent. 

75. Parliamentary Procedure. I, II. 1 hr. Devoted to an understanding through 
study and practice, of those rules of order by which group affairs can be con- 
ducted in an expeditious manner. Emphasis upon a philosophy which insures 
the observation of the basic principles of parliamentary procedure. 

80. Introduction to Broadcasting. I, II, S. 3 hr. Survey of the industry and its 
rolt 1 in today's society. Historical development of broadcasting, its responsibili- 
ties, and job opportunities. Organization of stations and their relation to net- 
works. Federal regulations and industry codes. Technical aspects of radio and 
television. Brief consideration of programming and production techniques. 
Field trips to area commercial and educational stations. (Also listed as Journal- 
ism 80). 

89. Appreciation of the Motion Picture. I, II, S. 3 hr. An introduction to the 

motion picture as an art form and communication medium. Selected films are 
viewed weekly and evaluated through class discussion. Consideration given to 
technique and aesthetics. Open to all students. (Also listed as Journalism 89). 
Lab. fee. 

Upper Division 

120. Group Discussion. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11 or 34. Discussion is studied 
through theory and practice. Principles, research and organization lor a group 
discussion are covered. Each student is given the opportunity to lead, he a 

discussant and ,i critic. Various aspects of group dynamics are studied and 

observed. 

121. Argumentation and Debate. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11 or 34. Study of the 
principles of research and use of evidence and reasoning in argumentative 
communication. Classroom debates test the student's ability to organize ideas 
and to analyze critically logic and evidence presented to support a proposition. 

L23. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. I. 3 hi. PR: Speech 121 or consent. 
Intensified training in the principles and techniques or argumentation and 
debate. Designed especially to prepare the student for participation in inter- 
collegiate debate competition. 

L24. Advanced Argumentation and Debate. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. 

L25. Advanced Public- Speaking. I. II. 3 hr. PR: Speed. 11 or 34. A practical 
approach I nun classical rhetoric. Recognizing that rhetoric- is both a positive 

178 



and an analytical art, techniques of clarity and interest are studied as well as 

methods of persuasion through motivation, ethos, suggestion and reasoning. 
The student is given an opportunity to speak in instructive, persuasive and 
evocative situations. 

126. Speech for Business and Industry. II. 3 hr. Designed particularly to meet the 
needs of business executives, supervisors, foremen, public relations personnel, 
salesmen, etc. Study of and performance in public speaking, conference 
methods, making reports, committee work, management leadership, group con- 
trols, and personnel relationships. 

170. Directed Speech Activities. I, II, S. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent of the Chairman. 
Credit may be awarded to non-majors who pursue a special reading program, 
independent research project, or extracurricular activity, under the guidance 
and direction of a member of the Speech faculty. 

181. Radio and Television Announcing. I and II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80 or consent. 
Procedures and routines of announcing in both media. Staff assignments, regu- 
lations, logged broadcasting operation, reports, and emergency procedures. 
Practice in reading of news, commercial and other types of broadcast copy. 
In-class production experience. 

182. Elements of Sound Reproduction. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80 or consent. A 
survey of the nature of sound, with emphasis on recording and reproduction 
techniques. Consideration given to acoustics, microphone operations, record 
manufacture, and fundamentals of speaker operation. In-class production ex- 
perience, and visits to area broadcasting stations. Open to all students. 

184. Broadcast Continuity- Writing. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80 or consent. Formats of 
all types of radio and television writing except dramatic scripts. Continuity 
for talks, interviews, discussions, music, variety, documentary programs, and 
commercial copy. Students will participate in studio productions of writing 
projects. 

185. Fundamentals of Television Production. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80 or consent. 
Elementary treatment of technical aspects. Station organization and personnel. 
Theory of camera operation, of television directing and staging. Field trips to 
educational and commercial stations for observation and/or the production of 
programs. Lecture and laboratory. 

189. Techniques of Motion Picture Production. I, S. 3 hr. Lab fee. An introduction 
to basic film making principles and techniques. Student film teams will pro- 
duce short sound films. (Also listed as Journalism 89). 

220. Speech Composition. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11 or 34 and consent. Emphasis on 
composing the speech for purposes of oral discourse. Consideration given to 
oral language as compared with written language, word choice, rhetorical 
structure and style. Study and critical analysis of selected speeches employed. 

221. Persuasion. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11 or 34 and consent. Study and practice in 
identification of factors motivating human behavior and belief, how to secure 
and hold attention, the uses of suggestion, the dramatization of ideas. Appli- 
cation to advertising and writing as well as speaking. 

222. Forms of Public Address. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Speech 11 or 34 and consent. Com- 
bines the study of the essential principles of effective speaking with the 
application of those principles to specific speech occasions. The critical analysis 
of model speeches, and the composition and delivery of forensic, deliberative, 
and epideictic speeches. 

223. Advanced Group Discussion. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 120 or consent. Application 

of the principles and practices of group discussion to classroom teaching, the 
conference tables, committee work, policy-determining groups, and the public 
form. Opportunities for participation by members of the class using current 
national and international problems. 

SPEECH 179 



225. [nterscholastic Forensics. S. 3 In. PR: Consent. Interscholastic speaking activi- 
ties with emphasis upon types commonly termed original speech, such as dis- 
cussion, debate, oratory, and extemporaneous speaking. 

*SPA 250. Survey of Oral Communication Disorders. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. A 
survej oi basic concepts and principles of the disorders of speech and their 
treatment. Primary attention is given to the more common speech deviations. 
Students observe examination and corrective methods of therapists in the 
clinic and schools. Normal speech and hearing development of children is 
considered. This is an orientation course for students majoring in speech as 
well as teachers, school administrators, psychologists, and rehabilitation 
workers. 

27(i. Psychology of Speech. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Modern psychological principles 
of speech learning and usage. Influences of emotion, conditioning, and habit 
on listening, thinking, language, learning, judgments, imagery, and personality 
as factors in oral communication. 

275. Speech Problems of Children. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Normal maturational de- 
velopment of listening and speaking skills, their relationships to language 
acquisition, and their influences upon achievement in reading and writing. 
Primarily for elementary and secondary school teachers and principals, lan- 
guage arts supervisors, and students in guidance and counseling. 

280. Radio and Television Dramatic Writing. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80, and Speech 
184, or consent. Theory and practice of the basic principles of broadcast 
dramatic script writing. Experience in writing adaptations, and original 
comedy, tragedy, melodrama and fantasy type scripts, as well as poetry pro- 
grams, serial dramas, children's shows and documentaries for commercial and 
educational purposes. Scripts are written for definite markets. 

282. Radio Workshop. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 181 or 182, or consent. Brief discussion 
of techniques of radio production. Advanced laboratory experience in the 
production of University radio programs. Adapted to students interested in 
commercial and educational broadcasting. 

283. Television Workshop. I. 3 hr. PR: Speech 185 or consent. Brief discussion of 
techniques of television production. Advanced laboratory experience in the 
production of University television programs. Adapted to students interested 
in commercial and educational broadcasting. 

284. Radio and Television Program Planning. II. 3 hr. PR: Speech 80 and consent. 
Analysis of the purpose and basic idea of a program in relation to audience 
composition. Requirements of effective structure. Practice in laying out pro- 
gram formats for all types of radio and television programming. 

280. Documentary Motion Picture Production. II or S. 3 hr. PR: Speech/Journalism 
ISO and Speech 184 or Speech 280. A detailed study of the documentary as a 
film form and social commentary. Students will write, produce, and exhibit a 
30-minute documentary using L6 mm Bolex camera equipment. Lab fee. 



•SPA Speech Pathology and Audiology. 



I HO 



The College of Commerce 



The College of Commerce, as a part of the University community, not only provides 
students with a rich education in the liberal arts tradition, but also offers professional 
programs in tune with the needs of business, industry, and government. 

Recent studies indicate that approximately 20 per cent of all college students 
are enrolled in business administration and economics. Such studies also estimate that 
nearly 60 per cent of all college graduates pursue careers closely akin to business. 
More and more high school graduates, appreciating the fundamental differences be- 
tween high school commercial training and collegiate business education, are selecting 
institutions offering quality professional programs. 

The College of Commerce offers programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science in Economics and Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. The 
curricula of the College consist of a balanced study of liberal arts and commerce. 
During the freshmen and sophomore years, undergraduates are given breadth in their 
collegiate education via the humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and other 
sciences. During the last two years, undergraduates attain depth in Commerce in the 
selection of a major program among accounting, economics, finance, industrial man- 
agement, and marketing. 

Colleges and universities offer their products— graduating seniors— in a free 
market to those enterprises which have a demand for their products. Every year there 
is an increasing number of firms, many of them national in scope and others regional 
in nature, recruiting on this campus for the business managers of tomorrow. The 
managers of the future must be better educated and better equipped to seize the 
opportunities and meet the challenges of an emerging automated economy. 

The thoughtful and farsighted high school graduate interested in progressing 
to top positions in business, industry, and government will select wisely an institu- 
tion offering quality programs. The College of Commerce is a full member of the 
American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, a status limited to a surpris- 
ingly small number of schools. Doubtless, the most important ingredient of professional 
education evolves around the quality of the faculty. The faculty of the College ex- 
ceeds fifty members and they have attained their graduate degrees from a wide but 
a very prominent number of universities. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

Jack T. Turner, D.B.A., Dean of the College of Commerce. 

Edward A. Johnson, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Programs in Business. 

Joseph New house, M.S., Director of the Undergraduate Programs and Administrative 

Assistant to the Dean. 
Richard D. Raymond, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Programs in Economics. 
James Thompson, Ph.D., Director of the Bureau of Business Besearch. 

181 



FACULTY 

John J. Aluise, M.B. V. Instructor in Marketing. 

Vance Q. Alvis, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Charles P. Austin, M.B. A., Instructor in Economics and Management. 

Robert J. Barill, M.B. A., Instructor in Management. 

Lewis C. Bell, Ph.D., Fiscal Economist and Professor of Economics. 

Robert D. Britt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economies. 

Thomas C. Campbell, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. | on leavi 

Robert B. Conner, M.B. A., Instructor in Management. 

Robert B. Crawford, M.S., Instructor in Management. 

Howard O. Croasmun, B.S., Lecturer in Accounting. 

Virginia 11. Cross, M.B. A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Accounting. 

Lynn E. Dellenbarger, Ph.D., Professor of Finance. 

Philip Divita, M.B. A., Instructor in Marketing. 

Betty G. Fishman, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Leo Fishman, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Finance. 

Charles France, M.B. A., Instructor in Economics. 

John R. Goodwin, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Business Law. 

William D. Goodwin, LL.B., Assistant Professor of Accounting and Business Law. 

Raymond M. Haas, D.B.A., Associate Professor of Marketing. 

Paul W. Hamelman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management. 

John Harpell, Jr., M.B. A., Assistant Professor of Management. 

Thomas S. Isaack, D.B.A., Professor of Management. 

Guy H. Johnson, M.B. A., Instructor in Economics. 

Jay E. Johnson, M.B.A., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Woo Sik Kee, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

George E. Kirk, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Management. 

Dennis R. Leyden, B.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Raymond R. McKay, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

William H. McMillion, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Edward Mack, B.S., Instructor in Economics. 

Patrick C. Mann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Robert S. Maust, M.S., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Edward M. Mazze, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing. 

William H. Miernyk, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

John L. Mikesell, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Sin nil] Parsley, M.B. A., Instructor in Economics. 

Donald E. Pursell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Richard D. Raymond, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Evan O. Roberts, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Marketing. 

Gilbert Rutman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Robert J. Saunders, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Kenneth L. Shellhammer, A.B., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Charles P. Skaggs, M.S., C.P.A., Assistant Professor of Accounting. 

Wilbur J. Smith, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

James Stitely, M.B. A., Instructor in Management. 

fames C. Summers, Mb. A.. Instructor in Management. 

\onii.m P. SwenSOn, M.A., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

James II. Thompson, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

182 



Jack T. Turner, D.B.A., Professor of Marketing. 
Vern H. Vincent, Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting. 
Royce E. Watts, M.S., Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Fred E. Wright, A.M., Associate Professor of Finance. 
Fred A. Zeller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics. 

BUREAU OF BUSINESS RESEARCH 

An integral part of the College of Commerce, the Bureau of Business Research 
undertakes research into business and economic problems— particularly those of West 
Virginia. This research program is carried out by faculty members and others under 
the general supervision of the Director of the Bureau of Business Research. Publi- 
cation of a series of monographs, the West Virginia Business and Economic Studies, 
was begun by the Bureau in 1949. 

ACCREDITATION 

The College of Commerce is accredited not only through the approval of West 
Virginia University by national and regional accrediting agencies, but also through 
full membership in the American Association of Collegiate Schools of Business This 
association is the only accrediting agency in the field of professional education for 
business at the collegiate level. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Beta Gamma Sigma, national scholarship society in commerce and business 
administration, is represented in the College of Commerce by the Alpha of West Vir- 
ginia Chapter. Eligibility for membership is restricted to the highest 4 per cent of the 
junior class, the highest 10 per cent of the senior class, and the highest 20 per cent 
of the graduate students. 

Student societies in specialized fields of commerce include Beta Alpha Psi, 
national professional accounting fraternity, and Omicron Delta Epsilon, national eco- 
nomics fraternity. 



SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

A student who has received a Bachelor's Degree from an approved college or 
University may become eligible for a second Bachelor's Degree by earning a mini- 
mum of 30 semester hours of credit, which shall include all the courses in the Com- 
merce Core and such other courses as the Dean may prescribe. 

WORK TAKEN AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

Students who expect to obtain a degree from the College of Commerce and 
who wish to take work at other institutions must have their programs approved by 
the Dean of the College of Commerce before registering at another institution of 
higher learning. Ordinarily required courses must be taken at West Virginia Uni- 
versity. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

Students registered in the College of Commerce will not be permitted to with- 
draw from courses after six weeks of each semester or after the second week of the 

COMMERCE 183 



Summer Session, the first day being defined here .is the initial day of upper-division 
registration. 

Students will not he permitted to withdraw from a required lower-division 
course while enrolled in upper-division courses. 

ABSENCES 

Each instructor shall be responsible for the attendance of students in his 
i lass.s and shall report an excessive number of absences to the Dean of the College 
for such action as may be deemed advisable. 

University students who find it necessary to he- absent from classes hy reason 
of absence from Morgantown while the University is in session must obtain permis- 
sion in advance from the Dean, and in case of University women, from the Dean of 
Women also. 

If a student's absences in any course exceed 12 per cent of the total number 
of recitations in the course, he may be barred from taking the final examination. 

If a student's absences in any course exceed 25 per cent of the total number of 
meetings, or he is absent from all the class meetings during 14 calendar days im- 
mediately preceding the period set for final examinations, he may he considered to 
have withdrawn irregularly from the course and be given a grade of "F." 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

To qualify for either the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration or 
Bachelor of Science in Economics degrees, the student who enters the University 
after September 1, 1964, must have: 

1. Earned 128 semester hours of credit with a "C" or 2.0 grade-point average 
on all work attempted at West Virginia University. In addition, all students entering 
the College of Commerce after September 1, 1965, are required to maintain at least 
a 2.0 average on work attempted after the date of their admission to the College. 

2. Earned 128 semester hours of credit in subjects other than in English 
and Mathematics 2. A maximum of 6 hours of credit in Advanced Military Science or 
Air Force Aerospace Studies will he allowed toward graduation and is counted as a 
non-commerce elective. Students who elect a foreign language must complete at least 
hours in the same language. 

3. Earned at least 60 hours of credit in upper-division courses (those 
numbered 100 or higher). 

4. Earned at least 30 hours of credit while enrolled in this college and in 
residence. 

5. Satisfied the requirements of the University Core Curriculum. 

6. Satisfied the course requirements of one of the Commerce curricula de- 
scribed below. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The student must complete the following eourses to qualify for a Bachelor ol 
Science degree in the College ol Commerce. These should normally he taken in the 
sequence described in the program sections on pages L86-189. 

184 



I. Non-Commerce Courses 



English 1 and 2— Composition and Rhetoric 

English 123— Business English 

Speech 11— Oral Communications 

Political Science 2— American Federal System 

Psychology 1— Introduction to Psychology 

Sociology' 1— Introduction to Sociology 

Mathematics 3— College Algebra 

Mathematics 8— Finite Mathematics 

Physical Education— Men's General Program 

Physical Education— Women's Program 

Electives— Core Group A 

Electives— Core Group B (other than Economics) 

Electives— Core Group C 

Other electives— Non-Commerce (Men) 

Other electives— Non-Commerce (Women) 



B.S. in 


B.S. 


Business 


in 


Admin. 


Economics 


Hr. 


Hr. 


6 


6 


3 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


4 


4 


6 


9 


6 


6 


6 


6 


18 


21 


16 


19 



II. Unrestricted Electives 



65 



68 



III. Commerce Core Courses 

Accounting 51 and 52— Principles 
Economics 51 and 52— Principles 
Economics 125— Statistics 
Economics 130— Money and Banking 
Economics 160— Labor Economics 
Business Law 111— Legal Environment 
Business Law 112— Commercial Law 
Finance 111— Business Finance 
Management 111— Manufacturing 
Marketing 111— Marketing 



IV. Major Requirements 

Accounting Majors 

Accounting 111 and 112— Intermediate Accounting 

Accounting 113— Advanced Accounting 

Accounting 115— Cost Accounting 

Accounting 211— Accounting Systems or 

Accounting 217— Auditing Theory 
Electives— Commerce 



36 



Hr. 

6 
3 
3 

3 
9 



18 



24 



COMMERCE 



185 



Finance Majors 

Economics 241— Public Finance 
Finance 112— Financial Management 
Finance 150— Investments 
Management 225— Business Policy 
Electives— Commerce 



B.S. in 
Business 
Admin. 

Hr. 

3 

3 

3 

3 
12 



Industrial Management Majors 

Accounting 115— Cost Accounting 

Management 112— Production Planning and Control 

Management 216— Personnel Management 

Management 225— Business Policy 

Electives— Commerce 



24 

Hr. 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 



Marketing Majors 

Marketing 112— Marketing Management 
Marketing 120— Advertising 
Marketing 215— Marketing Research 
Management 225— Business Policy 
Electives— Commerce 



24 

Hr. 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 



Economics Majors 

Economics 211— Micro Economic Analysis 

Economics 212— Macro Economic Analysis 

Economics 216— History of Economic Thought 

Economics 241— Public Finance 

Electives— Economics 

Electives— Business Administration 

Electives— Economics or Business 



24 

Hr. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
9 
9 
6 



36 



PRE-COMMERCE PROGRAM 

Pre-Commerce students arc expected to complete the Pre-Commerce Program 
stud) within then First two years of residence at the University. It is particularly 
import, mi tli.it Economics 51, 52, L25, and Accounting 5] and 52 be completed as 
scheduled since these courses are essential for .ill upper-division courses in the pro- 
fessional programs in the College o\ Commerce. 

Students must observe the University Core Curriculum requirements as to dis- 
tribution <>l elective courses. During the four years, the student must complete 12 



186 



hours of Group A electives including required Group A courses (Speech 11 and 
English 123), 15 hours of Group B electives other than Economics but including re- 
quired Group B courses (Psychol. 1, Sociol. 1, and Pol. Sci. 2), and 12 hours of 
Group C electives including the required Group C courses (Math. 3 and Math. 8) 
from the list of approved elective courses. 



Freshm; 


in Year 




Sophomore Year 




First S< iii.'- 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Acctg. 51 3 


Acctg. 52 


3 


Economics 51 


3 


Economics 52 


3 


Math. 8 2 3 


Econ. 125 


3 


Pol. Sci. 2 


3 


Math. 3 


3 


Speech 11 3 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


1 


Psych. 1 


3 


Sociol. 1 


3 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 1 


Electives— Core 




Phys. Ed. 




Phys. Ed. 




Electives— Core 


Group A 


3 


(M and W) 1 


1 


i M and W) 1 


1 


Group A 3 


Electives— Core 




Electives— Core 




Electives— Core 




Electives— Core 


Group B 


3 


Group C 


3 


Group C 


3 


Group B 3 


Electives (M) 
Electives (W) 


3 
3 



16 



16 



15 



15 



B.S. IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAMS 

Accounting 1 

The accounting program is designed to prepare students for public accounting 
and for positions as accountants in business, industry, and government. 





Junior 


Year 






Senior Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Acctg. Ill 


3 


Acctg. 112 


3 


Acctg. 211 (or 


Acctg. 113 


Acctg. 115 


3 


Bus. Law 112 


3 


Acctg. 217- 




Econ. 160 


Bus. Law 111 


3 


Mgmt. Ill 


3 


2nd Sem. ) 


3 


Electives— 


English 123 


3 


Mrkt. Ill 


3 


Econ. 130 


3 


Commerce 


Finance 111 


3 


Electives— Non- 




Electives— 




Electives— Xon 


Electives— Non 




Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


Commerce 


3 






Electives— Nor 
Commerce 


i- 
3 


Electives 
Unrestricted 



18 



18 



15 



15 



A minimum of 128 hours of credit must be earned in subjects other than English 0, and 
Math. 2. A maximum of 30 credit hours in Accounting is permitted in the 128 requirement. 

sThe student deficient in Mathematics, as evidenced by the ACT score, must take Math. 2, 
the remedial algebra course, during the first semester in residence in order to prepare for Math. 3 
and Math. 8 required in subsequent semesters. 



COMMERCE 



187 



Finance 1 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who plan to 
enter government service or to become associated with the financial or insurance 
departments of hanks, commercial firms, and industrial organizations. 





Junior 


Year 






Senior 


Year 




First Sou. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sen i. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Bus. Law 111 


3 


Bus. Law 112 


3 


Econ. 241 


3 


Econ. 160 


3 


Econ. 130 


3 


Finance 112 


3 


Finance 150 


3 


Mgmt. 225 


3 


English 123 


3 


Mgmt. Ill 


3 


Electives— 




Electives— 




Finance 111 


3 


Mrkt. Ill 


3 


Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


3 


Electives— 




Electives— Non- 




Electives— Xon- 


Electives— Non- 




Commerce 


3 


Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


3 


Commerce 


3 


Electives— Non 












Electives— 




Commerce 


3 










Unrestricted 


3 



18 



IS 



15 



15 



Industrial Management 1 

This program is designed to prepare students for positions in industrial man- 
agement, especially those in production and industrial relations. Although it does not 
provide technical training, it does provide a foundation upon which specialized train- 
ing can be developed. 





Junior 


Year 






Senior 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Bus. Law 111 


3 


Bus. Law 112 


3 


Econ. 160 


3 


Econ. 130 


Mgmt. Ill 


3 


Acctg. 115 


3 


Mgmt. 216 


3 


Mgmt. 225 


Mrkt. Ill 


3 


English 123 


3 


Electives— 




Electives— 


Electives— 




Finance 111 


3 


Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


Commerce 


6 


Mgmt. 112 


3 


Electives— Nor 




Electives— Non 


Electives— Non 




Electives— Non- 




Commerce 


6 


Commerce 


Commerce 


3 


Commerce 


3 






Electives— 
Unrestricted 



18 



18 



15 



15 



Marketing 1 

The marketing program is designed to prepare students for careers in the 
field of distribution, at the manufacturing, wholesaling, or retailing level. 





Junior 


Year 






Senior 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


S« cond Sem. 


Hr. 


l : irst Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Bus. Law 1 ] 1 


3 


Bus. Law 1 12 


3 


Econ. 160 


3 


Mrkt. 215 


Mgmt. 1 11 


3 


Econ. L30 


3 


Mrkt. 120 


3 


Mgmt. 225 


Mrkt. Ill 


3 


English 12.) 


3 


Electh es 




Electives— 


Electives— 




Finance 1 1 1 


3 


Commerce 


6 


( lommerce 


Commerce 


6 


Mrkt. 112 


3 


Electives— Non 


- 


Electives— Non- 


Electives— Non 




Electives— Non- 




( lommerce 


3 


Commerce 


Commerce 


3 


( lommerce 


3 






Electives— 
Unrestricted 



188 



is 



is 



15 



15 



B.S. IN ECONOMICS PROGRAM 



The economics program is designed for those who wish to emphasize eco- 
nomies in their education for a business career, for those who wish to undertake 
graduate work for an advanced degree in this field, and for those who wish to enter 
government service. 





Junior 


Year 




Senior 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hi. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Econ. 130 


3 


Econ. 212 


3 


Econ. 241 3 


Econ. 216 3 


Econ. 211 


3 


Electives— Bus. 


3 


Electives— Bus. 3 


Electives— Bus. or 


Electives— Bus. 


3 


Electives— Econ 


. 6 


Electives— Econ. 3 


Econ. 3 


Electives— Non 




Electives— Non- 




Electives— Bus. or 


Electives— Non- 


Commerce 


9 


Commerce 


6 


Econ. 3 
Electives— Non- 
Commerce 3 


Commerce 3 
Electives— 

Unrestricted 6 



IS 



18 



15 



15 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



ACCOUNTING" 

51. Principles of Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Sophomore standing. The funda- 
mentals of accounting for business enterprises: the accounting cycle, journals 
and ledgers, working papers, statements. 

52. Principles of Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 51. Further study of the 
accounting process with emphasis on assets, liabilities, and net worth; manu- 
facturing accounts; analysis of financial statements. 

111. Intermediate Accounting. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 52. Analysis of accounting 
theory and practice as applied to business firms; assets valuation, liabilities, 
income determination. 

112. Intermediate Accounting. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 111. A continuation of 
Accounting 111. 

113. Advanced Accounting. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Accounting for partner- 
ships, consolidations, installment sales, consignments, receiverships, reorgani- 
zations, branches, foreign exchange, and estates and trusts. 

115. Cost Accounting. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 52. Fundamentals of cost deter- 
mination with emphasis on the significance of cost data and their interpreta- 
tion; process, job-order, and standard costs. 



ir The student must earn at least 60 hours in upper-division courses (numbered 100 or 
higher). The apparent excess requirement of 6 hours (total of 66 hours indicated under each 
program) provides for the completion of the University Core program which may be at the lower- 
division (courses numbered 1 to 99) or upper-division levels. However, the student must take a 
minimum of 9 hours of upper-division non-commerce electives in the various Business programs 
and 18 hours in the Economics program. 

° "Economics 52 is a prerequisite for all upper-division courses. 



COMMERCE 



1S9 



211. Accounting Systems. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Tin- adaption of accounting 

procedures to the demands of the firm, with emphasis on theoretical factors 
important to efficiency and internal control; systems surveys and reports, the 
design oi forms, office machine applications. 

213. Income Tax Accounting. I. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112 or consent. Tax theory 
and practice as developed from the regulations of the Internal Revenue 
Service; problems in preparation of tax returns for individuals, partnerships, 
and corporations. 

214. Income Tax Accounting. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 213. A continuation of 
Accounting 213. 

216. Advanced Cost Accounting. II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 115. Advanced work in 
the application of cost theory and procedures to cases and problems which 
emphasize the managerial use of cost information. 

217. Auditing Theory. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112. Auditing fundamentals; 
objectives, standards and procedures; introduction to working-paper tech- 
niques; procedure statements of the American Institute of CPA's. 

218. Auditing Practice. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 217. Application of auditing 
theory and procedures, with emphasis on decisions which invoke judgment 
and are important in independent audits; audit working papers and reports; 
case studies. 

224. Advanced Accounting Problems. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Minimum of 18 hours in 
accounting with an average grade of "B" or higher. Analysis and solution of 
representative CPA problems. 

230. Advanced Accounting Theory. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 112, 115, and 
consent. A critical analysis of accounting concepts and standards with em- 
phasis on their origin, development, and significance. 



BUSINESS LAW** 

111. Legal Environment of Business. I, II. 3 hr. The nature of law and the judicial 
system. The relationship of law, ethics, and cultural values to business enter- 
prise. Substantive law of contracts, sales, and credit transactions and the social 
and economic consequences of court decisions. 

112. Commercial Law. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Business Law 111. Substantive law of 
agency, partnerships, corporations, negotiable instruments, and property and 
their social and economic functions. 



ECONOMICS 00 

51. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. Principles or resource allocation, income, 
output and price determination under different competitive conditions; money, 
banking, and monetary policy; national income, employment, and fiscal policy; 
taxation and government spending; international economics, underdeveloped 
areas, and comparative economic systems. 

52. Principles of Economics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 51. A continuation of 
Economics 51. 

125. Statistics. I, 11. 3 hr. PR: Math. 3. Basic statistical methods employed in col- 
lection, presentation, analysis, and interpretation of business and economic 
dala such as analysis of frequency distributions, time series, inference, index 
numbers, and correlation, 

130. Money and Banking. I, II. 3 hr. Our system of monetary and banking arrange- 
ments, viewed in relation to functioning of the economic system as a whole. 



••Economics 52 is a prerequisite for all upper-division courses. 



190 



160. Labor Economics. I, II. 3 hr. An introduction to labor economics and labor 
relations in industry, including the interaction of economic forces, union 
policies, personnel practices, and labor law. 

205. Current Economic Problems. S. 3 hr. PR: Economics 51 and 52 or consent. 
For students in Education only. A course designed to acquaint public school 
teachers with reliable sources material in economics and to instruct them in 
studying current economic problems. 

210. Comparative Economic Systems. I or II. 3 hr. Structure and proces 
existing economic systems throughout the world including review of basic- 
principles of free enterprise, socialistic, communistic, and fascists societies. 
Comprehensive analysis based on current and recent experiments in these 
economies. 

211. Micro Economic Analysis. I. 3 hr. A study of price and output determination 
and resource allocation in the firm under various competitive conditions. 

212. Macro Economic Analysis. II. 3 hr. An analysis of the forces which determine 
the level of income, employment, and output. Particular attention is given to 
consumer behavior, investment determination, and government fiscal policy. 

213. Economic Development. I or II. 3 hr. A comprehensive study of the problems, 
changes, and principal policy issues faced by non-industrialized countries in 
the process of economic development. 

216. History of Economic Thought. II. 3 hr. Economic ideas in perspective of 
historic development. 

220. Introduction to Quantitative Analysis. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 125. Study 
of the principal mathematical techniques employed in economic analysis; an 
introduction to econometrics. 

226. Advanced Statistics. II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 125 or equiv. An advanced ap- 
proach to statistical analysis with emphasis on probability, inference, and 
multi-varied statistical techniques. 

241. Public Finance. I. 3 hr. Governmental fiscal organizations and policy; taxes 
and tax systems with particular emphasis upon the Federal Government and 
the State of West Virginia. 

245. Government and Business. I or II. 3 hr. Government in its role of adviser and 
umpire; analysis of governmental policies and practices affecting business. 

246. Transportation. I. 3 hr. Development of an inland transportation system and 
relations and policies of transport agencies. 

250. International Economics. I or II. 3 hr. Development of trade among nations; 
theories of trade, policies, physical factors, trends, and barriers in international 
economics. 

255. Regional Economics. I or II. 3 hr. An analysis of the factors that promote or 
deter, the economic growth of a region, with emphasis on such matters as 
population shifts, economic base studies, industrial location analyses, input- 
output techniques, regional income estimation, local multiplier and cycle con- 
cepts, and the role of government in regional growth. 

261. Trade Unionism. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 160 or consent. An analysis of 
the structure, government, attitudes, and policies of organized labor; the im- 
plications of union policy. 

262. Collective Bargaining. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 160 or consent. Theory 
and practice of collective bargaining; including contract issues, types of re- 
lationships, and the role of government policy. 

263. Economics of Wages. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Economics 160 or consent. The de- 
termination of wage levels and structure; the functioning and organization of 
labor markets. 

COMMERCE 191 



265. Economics of Social Security. I or II. 3 hr. An examination and analysis of 
social and political efforts to provide economic security, including an exami- 
nation ol the parallel developments of private insurance. 

270. Strategic Factors in American Growth. I or II. 3 hr. Regional impact of chang- 
ing methods of production and distribution. 



FINANCE 00 

111. Business Finance. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Accounting 51 and 52 or consent. A study 
of the activities of the finance manager in the planning, acquisition, and ad- 
ministration of funds used in a business enterprise. 

1 12. Financial Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Finance 111. Application of fundamentals 
and theory to the analysis of cases in business finance. 

115. General Insurance. I, II. 3 hr. Theory of risk and its application to insurance; 
principles underlying all forms of insurance— life, property, casualty, fire, and 
surety. 

120. Life Insurance. I. 3 hr. PR: Finance 115. Principles of life-insurance protec- 
tion; legal regulation of insurance companies. 

150. Investments. I. 3 hr. PR: Finance 111 or consent. Investment analysis and 
management for the individual and the financial institution. 

161. Real Estate. II. 3 hr. Principles and practices of real estate business. 

216. Risk Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Finance 115 or consent. A study of the trans- 
ferable risks with which the enterpreneur must deal. Emphasis is on the pro- 
cess by which decisions are made for the handling of these risks, including 
an examination of the contributions and limitations of the insurance system. 



MANAGEMENT 00 

105. Management Process. I, II. 3 hr. A study of management as a process com- 
prised of the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling 
business activities. Emphasis is placed on management as a rational, orderly, 
intellectual process for making resources productive. 

111. Manufacturing. I, II. 3 hr. A survey of the important activities of the manu- 
facturing function including organization, economic limitations affecting man- 
ufacturing, and control systems and analytical tools used by manufacturing 
managers. 

112. Production Planning and Control. II. 3 hr. PR: Management 111. The man- 
agement of manufacturing and production activities with emphasis on their 
coordination and control to achieve production goals. 

213. Problems in Business Administration. I or II. 1-3 hr. 

216. Personnel Management. I, II. 3 hr. Principles and practices in the direction, 
coordination, and remuneration of manpower. 

225. Business Policy. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Completion of the Commerce Core courses. 
Integrated study of policies, organization, facilities, and control techniques of 
business enterprises. 



••Economic! 52 is a prerequisite for all upper-division courses. 



192 



MARKETING 00 

111. Marketing. I, II. 3 hr. Analysis of those activities through which business 
firms direct the flow of their goods and services to consumers and users. 

112. Marketing Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111. The application of 
fundamentals and theory to the analysis of marketing cases and the develop- 
ment of marketing strategies. 

115. Retailing. II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111. Management of retailing establish- 
ments, with emphasis on organization, merchandising, buying, sales promo- 
tion, customer services, and control of operations. 

120. Advertising. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111 and 112. Introduction to principles 
and practices of advertising, including preparation of a complete advertising 
campaign. 

210. Industrial Purchasing. I. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111. A survey of corporate pro- 
curement problems facing modern purchasing executives. 

215. Marketing Research. II. 3 hr. PR: Marketing 111. The utilization of present- 
day marketing research techniques in the solution of practical marketing prob- 
lems, with particular reference to West Virginia. 



COMMERCE 193 



The Creative Arts Center 



West Virginia University's newest building is the Creative Arts Center on the Evans- 
dale Campus. The first phase of this new facility was occupied in late 1968 with the 
dedication in April 1969. The instructional program and the cultural activities in 
music, art, and drama can benefit even.- individual on the campus in some way. Stu- 
dent and faculty performanees. shows from Broadway, and artists of national and in- 
ternational fame are presented in the Creative Arts Center. Almost all WVU students, 
at some time or other, are enrolled in a music, art, or drama class. 

The high school graduate who is seriously interested in the arts, who believes 
his abilities are strong, and who wants to prepare himself for a professional career in 
the arts should plan to visit the Creative Arts Center to see its fine facilities, its 
modern equipment, and meet some of the faculty members. The Division of Music 
offers a 4-year curriculum in Piano, Voice, Pipe-Organ, and every Band and Orches- 
tral Instrument except Harp; Theory-Composition, Theory-Music History, and Music 
Education-Yoeal and Music Education-Instrumental. The Division of Art offers a 
4-year curriculum in Studio Arts, and in Education. The Division of Drama offers a 
4-year curriculum in Applied Drama with an option in Acting-Directing or Design and 
Technical Theatre, and in Acting-Voice. 

Since most high schools offer a college preparatory program which emphasizes 
the academic subjects such as science, mathematics, history, etc., the student planning 
to major in the arts in college will usually have one-half or more of his freshman 
year subjects in music, art, or drama. For most students, this will be the first time 
they are studying the subjects they like best and receiving the appropriate credit- 
hour grade. It is not unusual for the student's schedule to provide him one or two 
full half-days that he can use for laboratory work, practice, library 7 reading, or other 
individual projects. The hours between classes can be used as the student decides. 
With all types of interesting activities, books, exhibits, lectures, student meetings, 
cultural programs, athletic and social events, the student is constantly making de- 
cisions concerning the wise use of his time. For the arts major, it is his responsibility 
to keep his academic interests in good balance with his cultural concentration. For 
the other University students, it is their responsibility to keep cultural interests in 
good balance with their academic concentration. 

The Creative Arts Center provides truly professional preparation of the highest 
quality under the guidance and direction of outstanding artists, performers, and in- 
spired educators. The alumni represent the strongest evidence of success as they 
establish their reputations in teaching performance, and technical careers in many 
states and foreign countries. The demand for WVU arts graduates increases each 
year. 

With one of the finest buildings for the arts in the nation, with an outstanding 
faculty, and with an aggressive and innovative attitude, the Creative Arts Center is 
establishing a national reputation in the arts. You, and your parents, are invited to 
visit and see the opportunities that are provided. A number of Saturdays are sched- 
uled throughout the school year for student conferences, auditions, and tours through 
the building. 

For information or appointment, write or call the Assistant Dean, Creative 
Arts Center. West Virginia University, Morgantown, W. Va., 26506, telephone 
(304) 293-4642. 



FACULTY 

Richard E. Duncan, Ph.D., Dean and Director of Creative Arts Center; Vrojessor of 

Music, 
Clifford W. Brown, M.F.A., Assistant Dean of Creative Arts Center: Professor of 

Music. 

194 



Division of Music 

James Benner, M.A., Assistant Professor of Music. Piano. 

Thomas S. Brown, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music. Music Education. 

Thomas S. Canning, M.M., Professor of Music Composition. Theory. 

Walter L. Coplin, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music, String Bass, Instrument Classes. 

Jon Crain, Professor of Music. Voice. 

Rose Crain, Assistant Professor of Music. Voice. 

Jon E. Engberg, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. Violoncello, Theory. 

Clyde N. English, D.S.M., Associate Professor of Music. Organ, Church Music. 

Philip J. Faini, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. Percussion, Theory. 

Mary Jane Glasscock, M.M., Instructor in Education. Music Education. 

Herman Godes, M.M., Professor of Music. Piano. 

Joseph A. Golz, M.M., Associate Professor of Music. Choral; Director of Opera. 

Leo Horacek, Ph.D., Professor of Music; Chairman of Department of Music Edu- 
cation. Music Education. 

Barton Hudson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music. Musicology. 

Charles L. Krusenstjema. M.M.. Assistant Professor of Music, Clarinet, Saxophone, 
Music History. 

Mary Krusenstjema, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music (part-time). Flute. 

Gerald Lefkoff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music. Theory, Viola. 

Stephen Lickman, M.M., Instructor in Music. Oboe, Theory. 

Frank E. Lorince, Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music; Chairman of Department 
of Theory and Composition. Theory. 

Margaret S. Lorince, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music; Chairman of Preparatory 
Department. Piano. 

Bernard R. McGregor, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Music. Voice; Lecturer in Music. 

James F. Miltenberger, D.M.A., Assistant Professor of Music. Piano. 

William Nelson, M.M., Instructor in Piano. 

Jane R. Pestun, M.M., Instructor in Music. Piano. 

Donald C. Portnoy, M.A., Associate Professor of Music. Violin; Acting Director of 
Department of Applied Music. 

Richard E. Powell, B.M., Assistant Professor of Music. Brass Instruments. 

George E. Schafer, Ph.D., Professor of Music; Chairman of Graduate Studies. 

Stephanie Shehatovich, Instructor in Music— University Extension. Piano. 

Roger C. Sherman, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. Trumpet. 

Edward Sprague, M.S., Associate Professor of Music— University Extension. 

Forrest W. Standley, Instructor in Music. French Horn. 

Mary E. Stringham, M.A., Professor of Music Education. 

R. Scott Stringham, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music. Lecturer in Music. Choir. 

June D. Swartwout, M.M., Instructor (part-time) in Music. Voice. 

Budd A. Udell, M.M.E., Assistant Professor of Music. Director of Marching Band. 
Concert Band, Theory. 

William O. Winstead, M.M., Assistant Professor of Music. Bassoon. 
Frances Yeend, Professor of Music. Voice. 

Division of Art 

George Nocito, M.F.A., Professor and Chairman of Art. 

John D. Clarkson, M.A., Professor of Art; Curator and Director of Acquisitions. 

Howard F. Collins, M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 

Barbara A. Drainer, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Art. 

CREATIVE ARTS CENTER 195 



Ben F. Freedman, M.A., Assistant Professor of Art. 
Glenn B. Hamm, M.F.A., Instructor in Art. 
Wendell E. McPherson, Instructor (part-time) in Art. 
Robert R. Malone, M.F.A., Associate Professor of Art. 
Joe F. Moss, M.A., Associate Professor of Art. 

Division of Drama 

Sam Boyd, Jr., M.F.A., Professor and Chairman of Drama. 

Robert B. Burrows, Ph.D., Professor of Drama; Director of Design. 

Joe E. Ford, M.A., Associate Professor of Drama; Director of Technical Theatre; 

Director of West Virginia High School Drama Festival. 
Stephen H. Foreman, M.F.A., Instructor in Drama. 

Lenette May Hardin, M.A., Assistant Professor of Drama. Oral Interpretation. 
James A. Hawkins, M.A., Assistant Professor of Drama. 
Patrick B. Murphy, M.A., Instructor in Drama. 

Charles D. Neel, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Drama; Studio Theatre Supervisor. 
Robert D. Pratt, M.A., Instructor in Drama. 



MUSIC 

The student interested in a career in Music has a wide range of areas from which to 
choose. He may wish to prepare himself to teach in elementary or secondary school, 
in private schools, in junior college, or in a college or university by following one of 
the Music Education curriculums. He may wish to give individual instruction in his 
privately owned music studio. His teaching preparation may provide him opportuni- 
ties to become a special consultant or music supervisor. Music teachers serve in in- 
dustry, as consultants with book companies, editors, as business managers and execu- 
tives. Manufacturers of musical instruments and supplies are constantly in need of 
teachers who will provide the technical information they need. Music teachers are 
sought by the music industry for positions in selling, in sales managing, and as 
business executives. 

Students majoring primarily in the musical performances, in addition to any 
personal ambitions they may have to perform professionally, may qualify themselves 
for teaching in a college or university by following one of the Applied Music cur- 
riculums. The student interested primarily in performance may continue his study of 
music with individual teachers, may work with professional instrumental or choral 
organizations, or may choose to give individual instruction in the privately-owned 
studio. 

The student who follows one of the curriculums in Theory, Music History, or 
Composition is uniquely qualified in his field to dedicate himself to this career. He 
may choose to compose, arrange, or edit music, or to teach, with additional college 
degrees, in a university or college. If a composer, he is primarily interested in ex- 
pressing his own creative ideas in and through music. A theorist or music historian 
may devote himself to research, analysis, or writing in these areas. 

It is quite possible for a music major to move from one music curriculum to 
another, particularly during his freshman and sophomore year, without great loss ol 
course credit. Music majors are encouraged to explore and to follow the curriculum 
for which they are best qualified and in which they can expect the greatest success. 

The Division of Music is a member <>f the National Association of Schools of 
Music. The Music Education Program offered in the Division of Music is fully 
accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. In addi- 
tion to the undergraduate program, an extensive Music program is offered leading 
to the Master of Music degree, the Doctor of Musical Arts degree, and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree. 

196 



The faculty consists of 38 artist-teachers and 21 graduate assistants. Each 
member was carefully selected because his musical background combined inspired 
teaching with outstanding experience as a professional performer. 

Faculty performing groups in the Division of Music are the American Arts 
Trio, Abbey Brass Guild, Woodwind Quintet, the Baroque Ensemble, the String 
Quartet, and the String Trio. 

Student performing groups are the Symphony Orchestra, three bands, five 
choirs, the Percussion Ensemble, the Opera department, the Trombone Ensemble, and 
numerous other chamber music ensembles. 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

After completing two years in the band or orchestra, especially qualified mem- 
bers of these organizations may continue service in them upon invitation and receive 
allowances in the form of remission of fees amounting to $30.00 per semester. 

The University Symphony Orchestra is open to all students, faculty members, 
and citizens of the community who are proficient in the playing of an orchestral 
instrument. The repertoire is that of the standard symphony orchestra, with special 
emphasis on contemporary American music. 

The functions of the orchestra are to provide the University and community 
an opportunity to hear symphonic music, to enable the student to gain orchestral ex- 
perience, and to serve as a laboratory for student composers, orchestrators, and con- 
ductors. 

Full rehearsals are held each Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock with sectional 
rehearsals scheduled once weekly in late afternoon. May be taken with or without 1 
hour credit as Music 103. 

The University Choir is open to all students in the University. Choir members 
are selected by audition. The repertoire includes intimate selections of Chamber 
Music proportion. Three rehearsals per week. May be taken with or without 1 hour 
credit as Music 105, Sec. 01. 

The University Singers is an ensemble of 60 vocalists selected by audition. The 
group sings the standard choral repertoire and makes several off-campus appearances 
during the year. Three rehearsals per week. May be taken with or without 1 hour 
credit as Music 105, Sec. 02. 

The Camerata Singers is a chamber ensemble of 10 singers selected by audi- 
tion. The repertoire of the group ranges from the middle ages to contemporary music. 
Two rehearsals per week. May be taken with or without 1 hour credit as Music 155. 

The Collegium Musicum is devoted to the performance of music for small 
vocal or instrumental ensembles, primarily early music. Three rehearsals per week. 
May be taken for 1 or 2 hours credit. 

The University Choral Union is open to all University students who can satis- 
factorily sing a part. This organization offers opportunity to participate in the per- 
formance of major choral works. May be taken with or without 1 hour credit as 
Music 102. 

The University Bands are composed of three units: the Mountaineer Marching 
Band, the Concert Band, and the Wind Symphony. Membership is open to men and 
women in all classes of the various schools, divisions, and colleges in the University. 

The Mountaineer Marching Band is traditionally a men's organization and is 
active during the football season. The Concert Band is organized at the conclusion 
of football season and membership includes both men and women. The Wind Sym- 
phony for both men and women is active throughout the year. May be taken with or 
without 1 hour credit as Music 100. 

Student Organizations 

The Division of Music sponsors Epsilon Nu chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon, Epsilon 
Sigma chapter of Phi Mu Alpha, a chapter of the Music Educators National Confer- 
ence, Omicron chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, and a chapter of Tau Beta Sigma. 

MUSIC 197 



THE BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

Before graduation, all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Music must 
fulfill the Grade Level requirements in Applied Music 1 and establish credits in public 
performance 2 as follows: 

Applied Music— Grade Level 10—3 credits in public performance. 

Music Education— Grade Level 7—2 credits in public performance. 

Theory-Composition— Grade Level 8—2 credits in public performance. 

Theory-Music History— Grade Level 7—2 credits in public performance. 
In order to graduate, all music majors must demonstrate proficiency in keyboard 
harmony by passing an examination. 

As a part of the requirements for graduation, each full-time undergraduate 
music major must maintain a satisfactory record of attendance at recitals and con- 
certs presented at West Virginia University during each semester of residence. 

Music majors participate in at least one music organization as indicated in the 
curriculum. Scholarship recipients, however, are expected to render service as needed. 
such as participating in a particular organization, or ensemble, or to accompany, as 
the Dean may designate. 

Transfer students must establish transfer credit from other institutions during 
the first semester in which they are enrolled in the Division of Music. 

The student is responsible for correctly fulfilling all requirements. Each stu- 
dent should review his course requirements both before and after every registration 
period so that errors or omissions will be detected immediately. 

The Bachelor of Music Degree is conferred upon any student who complies 
with the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all en- 
trance and departmental requirements, and completes one of the curriculums in music 
with an average of 2.0 (C) grade points per semester hour. 



ACCELERATED CURRICULUMS 

Students wishing to complete any Music curriculum in less than four years 
may, with the approval of the adviser and the Department Chairman, accelerate their 
program by attending summer session. All requirements of the four-year curriculum 
must be satisfied. 



COMBINED APPLIED-MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

An optional program can be arranged for students who desire to meet the re- 
quirements of majors in both Applied Music and Music Education. Admission to this 
program is by written consent of the Chairman of Applied Music and the Chairman 
of Music Education after the student has completed two semesters. This curriculum 
satisfies the course requirements of the Professional Certificate, Grades 1-12. 

The numerous possible combinations of Applied Music with Music Education 
cannot be listed separately in this bulletin. When the student becomes a candidate 
for this degree, his adviser designates the specific courses which must be taken to 
satisfy the requirements for both Applied Music and Music Education. By attending 
summer sessions, it may be possible to complete the combined curriculum in four 
years. 



i"i i complete Listing of levels in applied music, < onsull tin Division of Music. 
"V.i more than 10 hours in Orchestra, Bands, and (lionises will be counted toward require- 
ments for graduation. Grade points in excess oi - hours of credit in choral groups will not be 
counted towards requirements for graduation of students m Music Education with an instrumental 
< mphasis. Grade points iii excess of 2 hours di credit in Orchestra and Bands will not be counted 
towards requirements for graduation oi students in Music Education with choral emphasis. For 
curricula other than Music Education, not more than 8 hours of Orchestra, Hands, and Choruses 
will be counted toward requirements for graduation. 

198 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Students successfully completing the Music Education curriculum will have 
satisfied course requirements for the Professional Certificate, Grades 1-12. This cer- 
tificate qualifies one to teach music on both elementary and secondary levels. 

In order to qualify for student-teaching, a student must have a 2.25 grade- 
point average in all work attempted, and a 2.0 average in Education courses ( normally 
Ed. 100, 105 and 106). 

Music majors wishing to qualify for a second teaching field other than music 
at secondary level will satisfy the requirements for the Professional Certificate, 
Grades 7-12, by completing the requirements of the second teaching field and the 
following courses in Education: 100, 105, 106, 120, 124, 169, and an approved 2-hour 
elective in Secondary- Education. (See College of Human Resources and Education 
for requirements in teaching fields.) 



APPLIED CURRICULUM-PIANO 

The Applied Music Curriculum is especially designed for students wishing to 
concentrate on performing or teaching a particular instrument. The increased interest 
of society today in the arts is creating many new opportunities for the professional 
musician and for the private music teacher. 





First 


Year 




Second Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 4 


Music 1, 2 


4 


Music 3, 4 


4 


Music 5, 6 


4 


Music 7, 8 4 


Music 40 


1 


Music 41 


1 


Music 42 


2 


Music 43 2 


Music 100- 




Music 100- 




Music 100- 




Music 100- 


105** 


1 


105** 


1 


105** 


1 


105** 1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Music 155 


1 


Music 155 1 


Core Group 


B 


Core Group B 




Music elective 


2 


Music elective 2 


or C* 


3-4 


or C* 


3-4 


Elective 


3 


Elective 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 


1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 



17-18 





Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 252 


3 


Music 280, 281 




Music 155 


1 


Music 155 


1 


Music 100- 




282 or 283 


3 


Music 220 


o 


Music 221 


o 


105** 


1 


Music 100- 




Elective 




Music 299 


2 


Music 155 


1 


105** 


1 


( Academic ) 


3 


Music 100- 




Music 160 


1 


Music 155 


1 


Music 100- 




105** 


1 


Music 253 


2 


Music 161 


1 


105** 


1 


Core Group B 




Music elective 


2 


Music 254 


2 


Core Group B 




or C* 


3-4 


Core Group A 


3 


Music elective 
Core Group B 
or C* 


2 
3 


or C* 

Music elective 


3-4 
2 


Music elective 


2 



17 



17 



16-17 



15-16 



A total of 16 hr. of Core Groups B and C an- required, with no less than n hr. in either 
At least 2 hr. must be in a choral organization. 



MUSIC 



1VD 



APPLIED CURRICULUM-ORGAN 





First Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. 


Hr. 


First Scm. 




Hr. 


Second Scm. 


Hr. 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 




4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 




2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 1, 2 


4 


Music 3, 4 


4 


Music 5, 6 




4 


Music 7, 8 


4 


Music 40 


1 


Music 41 


1 


Music 42 




2 


Music 43 


2 


Music 100- 




Music 100- 




Music 100- 






Music 100- 




105** 


1 


105** 


1 


105*° 




1 


105° ° 


1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Elective 




3 


Elective 


3 


Core Group 


B 


Core Group B 




Phys. Ed. (W) 


1 


Phys. Ed. (\V) 


1 


or C* 


3-4 


or C* 


3-4 












Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 













19-20 



19-20 



16-17 



16-17 







Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 




First Scm. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Music 150 




4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 183 




2 


Music 280, 281 




Music 100- 


Music 100- 




Music 252 




3 


282 or 283 


3 


105** 1 


105* * 


1 


Music 253 




2 


Music 254 


2 


Music 220 1 


Music 221 


1 


Music 160 




1 


Music 161 


1 


Academic elect. 3 


Music 299 


o 


Music 100- 






Music 100- 




Core Group B 


Core Group B 




105** 




1 


105** 


1 


or C* 3-4 


or C* 


3-4 


Music elective 


2 


Music elective 


2 


Music elective 4 


Music elective 


4 


Core Group 


A 


3 


Core Group B 
orC* 


3 









18 



16 



16-17 



15-16 



°A total of 16 hr. of Core Groups B and C ait lequired, with no less than 6 hr. in either 
00 At least 6 hr. must be in a choral organization. 



APPLIED CURRICULUM 

Flute, Oboe, Clarinet, Saxophone, Bassoon, Horn Trumpet, Trombone, Euphonium, 
Tuba, Percussion, Violin, Viola, 'Cello, and Double Bass 



First Year 








Second 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 




Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. Hr. 


Music 150 4 


Music 150 




4 


Music 150 


4 


Music L50 4 


Music 150 2 


Music 150 




2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 2 


Music 1, 2 4 


Music 3, 4 




4 


Music 5, 6 


4 


Music 7. 8 4 


Music 40 1 


Music 41 




1 


Music 42 


2 


Music 43 2 


Music 100 or 103 1 


Music 100 or 


103 


Music 100 or 103 1 


Music 100 or 103 1 


English 1 3 


English 2 




3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 3 


Core Group B 


Core Group 


B 




Phys. Ed. 


(W) 1 


Plus. Ed. (W) 1 


or C* 3-4 


or C° 




3-4 








Phys. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. 




1 









19-20 



19-20 



16-1' 



16-17 



•A total of IH hr. of Core Groups H and C are required, with no less than 6 hr. in cither 



200 



Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sent. III. 


Second Sem 




///. 


First San. Ih 


nil S< '/'. Hi . 


Music L50 4 


Music 150 




4 


Musi, 130 4 


Music L50 4 


Music 117 2 


Music US 




2 


Music 280, 281, 


Music 299 2 


Music 160 1 


Music 161 




1 


282, 283 3 


Mum. 1.".-) 1 


Music 155 1 


Music 155 




1 


Music 155 1 


Music 100 or 103 1 


Music 100 or 103 1 


Music 100 or 


103 


Music 100 or 103 1 


Core Group B 


Music 252 3 


Music 254 




o 


Core Group B 


or C° 3-4 


Music 253 2 


Core Group 


B 




or C° 3-4 


Music elective 2 


Core Croup A 3 


or C° 




3 


Music elective 2 
Academic elect. 3 





17 



14 



17-18 



13-14 



APPLIED CURRICULUM-VOICE 





First 


Year 




Seconc 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 4 


Music 150 4 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 2 


Music 150 2 


Music 1, 2 


4 


Music 3, 4 


4 


Music 5, 6 4 


Music 7, 8 4 


Music 40 


1 


Music 41 


1 


Music 42 2 


Music 43 2 


Music 102 or 


105 1 


Music 102 or 


105 1 


Music 102 or 105 1 


Music 102 or 105 1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Foreign lang.* 3 


Foreign lang.° 3 


Foreign lang 


° 3 


Foreign lang 


* 3 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 







19 



19 



16-17 



16-l r 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 150 


4 


Music 20 


2 


Music 20 


2 


Music 160 


1 


Music 161 


1 


Music 252 


3 


Music 254 


2 


Music 210 


2 


Music 210 


2 


Music 253 


2 


Music 102 or 105 ] 


Music 220 


2 


Music 221 


2 


Music 102 or 


105 1 


Foreign lang.* 


3 


Music 280, 


281, 


Music 299 


2 


Foreign lang 


.* 3 


Core Group B 




282 or 283 3 


Music 102 or 105 


1 


Core Group 


B 


or C°* 


3 


Music 102 or 


105 1 


Music elective 


2 


or C°* 


3 






Music elective 2 


Core Group A** 


3 










Core Group 


A*« 







18 



15 



15 



17 



°One year each of Italian, French, German. 
"One course required from Core Groups A, B, or C. 



THEORY-COMPOSITION CURRICULUM 

The Theory-Composition curriculum concentrates on such activities as musical 
analysis, composition, and arranging. It is chiefly designed for students who wish to 
become college teachers in these areas. 

Students majoring in Theory-Music History are prepared to pursue careers in 
the teaching of music history and theory at the college level. 

In both the Theory-Composition and Theory-Music History areas the student 
ordinarily does graduate work after receiving the bachelor's degree. 



MUSIC 



201 



First Year 



Second Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

Music 150- 2 

Music elective 2 

Music 1, 2 4 

Music 40 1 
Music 100, 102, 

103, 105, 

or 155 3 1 

English 1 3 

Core Group B* 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 2 

Music elective 2 

Music 3, 4 4 

Music 41 1 
Music 100, 102, 

103, 105, 

or 155 3 1 

English 2 3 

Core Group B 4 4 

Phys. Ed. 1 



First Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 
Music 5, 6 4 

Music 42 2 

Music 114 2 

Music 100, 102, 

103, 105, 

or 155 3 1 

French, German, 

Italian l 5 3 

Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



Second Sein. Hr. 
Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 
Music 7, 8 4 

Music 43 2 

Music 114 2 

Music 100, 102, 

103, 105, 

or 155 3 1 

French, German, 

Italian 2 5 3 

Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



18 



18 



16-17 



16-17 



Third Year 



Fourth Year 



First Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 
Music 117 2 

Music 252 3 

Music 253 2 

Music 256 2 

Music 100, 102, 
103, 105, 155, 
or 284 3 1 

French, German, 
Italian 3 5 3 



Second Sem. Hr. 
Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 
Music 118 2 

Music 254 2 

Music 256 2 

Music 100, 102, 
103, 105, 155, 
or 284 3 1 

French, German, 
Italian 4 5 3 



First Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 

Music 183 2 

Music 256 2 
Music 280, 281, 

282, or 283 3 
Music 100-105, 

155, or 284 3 1 

Core Group C 4 4 



Second Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music elective 2 

Music 184 2 

Music 255" 2 
Music 280, 281, 

282, or 283 3 

Music 120 2 
Music 100-105, 

155, or 284 3 1 

Core Group C 4 4 



17 



14 



16 



18 



iA student working toward the degree of Bachelor of Music in Theory and Composition 
must have at least an average of "B" in the required freshman and sophomore Theory courses or 
consent of the department chairman. 

Candidates for this degree must complete grade level 8 on their major instrument and 
grade level 4 in piano. 

3 At least 4 hr. must be in a major performing group. 

4 A total of 16 hr. of Core Groups B and C are required with at least 6 hr. in each area. 

5 Another language may be substituted with the approval of the chairman of the Theory- 
Composition Department. 

6 Major project in Theory or Composition. 



THEORY-MUSIC HISTORY CURRICULUM 





First Year 




Sc 


coin 


1 Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Music 150' 


2 


Music 150 1 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 2 


Elective 


2 


Elective 8 


2 


Elective 3 


2 


Elective" 2 


Music 1, 2 


4 


Music 3, 4 


4 


Music 5, 6 


4 


Music 7, 8 4 


Music 40 


2 


Music 41 


2 


Music 42 


2 


Music 43 2 


Music 100-105. 




Music 100-105, 




Music lOO-lOo. 




Music 100-105, 


or 155 2 


i 


or 155" 


1 


or 155 2 


1 


or 155 2 1 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


French, German 




French, German 


Core ( .ioup B 


3 


Core Croup B 


3 


Latin l 4 


3 


Latin 2* 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Core Group B 
Phys. Ed. (W) 


3 

1 


Core Group B 3 
Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



18 



l.s 



17-18 



17-18 



202 





Third 


Year 




F 


ourtl 


i Year 




First Scm. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. 


Hi. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


nd Sem. 


Hr. 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music- 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Elective' 


2 


Electivi 


2 


Music 114 


2 


Music 114 


2 


Music 117 


2 


Music 118 


2 


Music 282 


3 


Music 255 


2 


Music 252 


3 


Music 254 


o 


Music 100-105, 




Music 100-105, 




Music 253 


2 


Music History 


3 


155, or 284 2 


1 


155, or 284 2 


1 


Music History 


3 


Music 100-105, 




Lit. (English 




Literature or 




Music 100-105 




155, or 284 2 


1 


or Foreign) 


3 


Art Apprec. 


3 


155, or 284 2 


1 


Core Group C 


4 


Gore Group C 


4 


Core Group C 


4 


French, German. 


French, Germar 


i, 










Latin 3 4 


3 


Latin 4 4 


3 











18 



19 



15 



14 



1 A maximum of 16 hr. of applied music credit will be counted for the completion of level 
7 on the major instrument and a maximum of 12 hr. will be counted for the completion of level 4 
in secondary piano. Students must complete grade level 7 on their major instrument and grade 
level 4 in secondary piano. 

2 At least 4 credit hr. must be in a major performing group. 

3 A student desiring to take more than 6 hr. of electives in non-music courses must have the 
approval of the chairman of the Theory-Composition Department. 

^Another language may be substituted with the approval of the chairman of the Theory- 
Composition Department. 



MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM-VOCAL EMPHASIS 

These curriculums prepare students to teach music in the public schools. While 
each involves an emphasis in either instrumental or vocal music, both curriculums 
lead to a certificate for teaching both instrumental and vocal music in grades 1 to 12. 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. Hr. 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 2 


Music 150 1 


1 


Music 150 1 


1 


Music 150 


2 


Music 150 2 


Music 80, 82, 




Music 80, 82, 




Music 5, 6 


4 


Music 7, 8 4 


84, or 86 2 


1 


84, or 86 2 


1 


Music 42 


2 


Music 43 2 


Music 1, 2 


4 


Music 3, 4 


4 


Music 183 


2 


Music 184 2 


Music 40 


1 


Music 41 


1 


Music 102 or 105 1 


Music 102 or 105 1 


Music 102 or 105 


Music 102 or 1C 


•5 1 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Phvs. Ed. (W) 


Phvs. Ed. (W) 1 


Core Group C 


4 


Core Group C 


4 








Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 









18 



18 



16-17 



16-17 



'Music Education— Vocal emphasis majors whose applied major is a keyboard instrument 
must complete level 4 in voice. Students must demonstrate piano level 4 to use organ as an applied 
minor. 

2 Music Education— Vocal emphasis majors are required to take 5 hours in Music 80, 82, 84, 
and 86, including at least one semester of each. 

3 For many students it will be required that the courses in these two semesters be inter- 
changed. 



MUSIC 



203 



First Si in. 
Music L50 

Music- so. 82, 

84, or 86 s 
Music LSI 
Music 102 or 10£ 
Educ. 105 
Educ. 100 
Social Sci. 1 
Math. 21, 22 

or 15 



Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 




Hr. 


Second Scm. 


Hr. 


First Scm. 11 r. 


Second Scm. 


Iff. 


2 


Music L50 


2 


Music 150 2 


Music 150 


2 




Music 80, 82, 




Music 80, 82, 


Music 102 or 


105 1 


1 


84, or 86* 


1 


84, or 86 2 1 


Educ. 115 


3 


3 


Music 1 S2 


3 


Music 102 or 105 1 


Educ. 130 


2 


)5 1 


Music 120 


2 


English 35, 36, 


Educ. 125 


4 


3 


Music 102 or 105 1 


or 135, 136 3 


Educ. 120 


4 


1 


Educ. 106 


3 


Math. 22 or 15 2 


Educ. 169 


2 


3 


Social Sci. 2 
English 35, 36, 


3 


Health Ed. 102 2 
Art 30 3 






2 


or 135, 136 


3 


Speech 31 or 34 
or Drama 50 3 







16 



18 



17 



18 



MUSIC EDUCATION CURRICULUM-INSTRUMENTAL EMPHASIS 



First Sem. 
Music 150 
Music 150 1 
Music 80, 82 

or 84 2 
Music 1, 2 
Music 40 
Music 100 or 103 
English 1 
Core Group C 
Phys. Ed. 



First Year 


Jlr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


2 


Music 150 2 


1 


Music 150 1 1 




Music 80, 82, 


1 


or 84 2 1 


4 


Music 3, 4 4 


1 


Music 41 1 


3 1 


Music 100 or 103 1 


3 


English 2 3 


4 


Core Group C 4 


1 


Phys. Ed. 1 



Second 
First Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music 150 1 

Music 150 1 
Music 80, 82, 

or 84 2 1 

Music 5, 6 4 

Music 42 2 

Music 183 2 
Music 100-105 3 2 

Hist. 1 3 

Fins. Ed. (W) 1 



Year 

Second Sem. Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music 150 1 

Music 150 1 
Music 80, 82, 

or 84 2 1 

Music 7, 8 4 

Music 43 2 

Music 184 2 

Music 100-105 2 

Hist. 2 3 

Phys. Ed. (W) 1 



18 



18 



18-19 



18-19 



First Sem. 
Music 150 
Music 80, 82 

or 84 2 
Music 117 
Music 181 
Music 100, 103 3 
Educ. 105 
Educ. 100 
Social Sci. 1 
Math. 21, 22, 

or 15 



Third 


Year 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


2 


Music 150 2 




Music 80, 82, 


1 


or 84 2 1 


2 


Music 118 2 


3 


Music 182 3 


i 1 


Music 100, 103 3 1 


3 


Educ. 106 3 


1 


Social Sci. 2 3 


3 


English 35, 36, 




or 135, 136 



Fourth Year 



First Sem.* Hr. 

Music 150 2 

Music 86 1 

Music 100, 103 3 1 
English 35, 36 

or 135, 136 3 

Math. 22 or 15 2 

Health Ed. 102 2 

Art 30 3 
Speech 31 or 34 

or Drama 50 3 



Second Sem.* Hr. 

Music 150 2 
Music 100, 103 a 1 

Educ. 115 3 

Educ. 130 2 

Educ. 125 4 

Educ. 120 4 

Educ. 169 2 



is 



18 



17 



18 



'Musii Education' [nstrumental emphasis majors whose applied major is a keyboard instru- 
ment must complete level 4 <>n on< othei instrument. 

1 Music Education [nstrumental emphasis majors are required to take 2 semesters cadi oi 
\iu U 80, 82, and 84. 

\1iim< Education [nstrumental majors are required to take 8 semesters of a major instru- 
■ i ■• iii.il group and 2 semesters of a major choral group. 

•I or man) Btudents it will be required that the courses In these two semesters be Inter- 
( hanged. 



20 / 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC 

1. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. Aural skills and sight-singing involving melodic, harmonic, 
and rhythmic elements of music. Intervals, triads, scales, keys, and cadences. 

2. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. A study of the basic elements of music with emphasis on 
notational skills and analysis. Intervals, triads, scales, keys, and cadences. 

3. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 1. Aural skills and sight-singing. Introduction 
of seventh chords and modulation. 

4. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 2. Continuation of Music 2. Seventh chords, 
modal scales, key relationships, modulation, transposition, and the study of 
four-part writing. 

5. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 3. Aural skills and sight-singing. Continuation 
of Music 3. 

6. Theory Discussion. I. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 4 or consent. Partwriting, harmoniza- 
tion, harmonic and formal analysis. 

7. Theory. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 5. Aural skills and sight-singing. Continuation 
of Music 5. 

8. Theory Discussion. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 6. Continuation of Music 6 

10. Appreciation of Music. I, II. 3 hr. An introductory course designed to develop 
an appreciation and understanding of the significance of music as a fine art, 
and to help the student develop intelligent listening habits. Musical termin- 
ology and historical data are presented as needed but central to the course is 
the listening experience and listening assignments are included. Not open to 
music majors. 

1 1. Music As an Art and Science. I, II. 2 hr. Fundamental music skills and knowl- 
edge for elementary classroom teachers. Not open to music majors. 

12. Music Materials and Procedures. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Music 10 or equiv., and 
Music 11. Methods and materials for elementary classroom teachers. Not open 
to music majors. 

20. Introduction to Opera Theatre. I, II. 0-4 hr. Max. credit 8 hr. PR: Consent. 
Practical work in all aspects of lyric theatre production. Development of lyric 
theatre stage technique through movement studies, performance in minor roles, 
and operatic scenes. 

40. Introduction to Music Listening. I. 1 hr. Guided listening to important works 
from all historical periods with emphasis upon the development of awareness 
of stylistic traits, such as harmonic idiom, melodic structure, tonal movement, 
texture, rhythm, etc. For music majors only. 

41. Introduction to Music Listening. II. 1 hr. PR: Music 40. Continuation of 
Music 40. 

42. Music Literature. I. 2 hr. PR: Music 41 or consent. A study of vocal literature, 
solo and choral, with emphasis on the historical development of style. The 
course is centered on familiarity- with a selected repertory of works presented 
in historical context. 

43. Music Literature. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 41 or consent. A course similar to 

Music 42 but devoted to instrumental music. Concentration will be on Music 
after 1700. 

80. Woodwind Class. I, II. 1 hr. Beginning instruction on woodwind instrument. 
May be repeated for credit; maximum credit 2 hr. 

82. Brass Class. I, II. 1 hr. Beginning instruction on brass instrument. May be re- 
peated for credit; maximum credit 2 hr. 

84. String Class. I, II. 1 hr. Beginning instruction on strings. May be repeated for 
credit; maximum credit 2 hr. 

MUSIC 205 



86. Percussion Class. [, II. 1 In. Beginning instruction on percussion. 

LOO. Band. I. II. () to 1 hr. 

102. University Choral Union. I. II. to 1 hr. 

L03. University-Community Symphony Orchestra. I, II. to 1 hr. 

105. University Choir. I. II. to 1 hr. 

1 11. Composition. I. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 8 or consent. Creative writing. Course 
ma) be repeated for credit. Maximum credit 8 hr. 

1 17. Instrumentation. I. 2 hr. PR: Music 4. Study of the characteristics of band 
and orchestral instruments and their use in scoring. 

118. Orchestration and Band Arranging. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 117. Problems in scor- 
ing lor orchestral ensembles and band. 

120. Choral Arranging. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 4. A study of the characteristics and 
problems in scoring for choral combinations. 

138. Introduction to Music History. II. 3 hr. PR: Music 10 or consent of instructor. 
Main trends of musical thought and style. Not open to music majors. 

140. History of Music. I. 3 hr. Survey of music history from the pre-Christian era 
to the baroque. 

141. History of Music. II. 3 hr. Survey of music history from the baroque to the 
contemporary period. 

150. Applied Music. I. II. 0-4 hr. Open to qualified students in any field in Applied 
Music. Course number may be repeated as many times as necessary or de- 
sirable. Credit given at the following rates: 

1. For music majors, two hours for each 30-minute weekly lesson. 

2. For other students, a maximum of one 30-minute lesson per week for one 
hour of credit. 

3. Students in lower grade levels of Applied Music may be grouped in small 
classes for initial instruction. 1-2 hr. credit. 

155. Chamber Music. I, II. to 1 hr. PR: Consent. This course provides the 
opportunity to perform in small ensembles. Course may be repeated. 

100. Methods and Pedagogy in Major and Applied Fields. I. 1 hr. PR: Music 150. 

101. Methods and Pedagogy in Major and Applied Fields. II. 1 hr. PR: Music 160. 

181. Music Education. I, II. 3 hr. Essentials of music education in the elementary 
grades. 

182. Music Education. I, II. 3 hr. Essentials of music education in junior and senior 
high school. 

IS'). Conducting. I. 2 hr. A basic course in conducting techniques, both choral and 
instrumental. 

184. Conducting. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 183. Continuation of Music 183, including 
more advanced score reading and conducting techniques, both choral and in- 
strumental. 

200. Band, Orchestra, Choral, Opera Theatre, and Music Education Clinics. 2 hr. 
Special problems of organization and development ol the various performing 
organizations. Lecture-, laboratory and discussion groups. 

20 1. Music in the Elemental") School. I, II. 3 hi. PR: Music 10. 11, 12, or consent. 
Development ol skills, procedures, techniques, and materials used by the 
genera] classroom teachei ol music in grades 1-8. Not open to music majors. 

2'i2 The Teaching of Music Appreciation. 3 hr. PR: Music- 10. II, 12 or equiv. A 
review ol Information, materials, sources, and techniques involved in teaching 
appreciation ol music in the public schools. Not open to music majors. 

206 



204. Contemporary Techniques in Classroom Music. 3 hi. PR: Music 10, 11, 12 or 
equiv. Intensive study of the principles and practice of contemporary tech- 
niques in elementary and junior high school classroom music, including those 
of Orff and Kodak. 

210. Opera Theatre. I. II. 0-4 hr. Max. credit 8 hr. PR: Music 20 or consent. Con- 
tinuation of Music 20. Performance of major roles and advanced production 
techniques. Qualified students will undertake production-direction projects 
under supervision. 

220. Repertoire. I. 0-2 hr. 

221. Repertoire. II. 0-2 hr. 

246. Music in the Junior High School. 2 hr. PR: Music 181-182 or equiv. A con- 
sideration of the potentialities and special needs of the junior high school in 
music education; programs, procedures, and materials. 

252. Analysis of Musical Form. I. 3 hr. PR: Music 8 or consent. A detailed study 
of the structure of music. 

253. Counterpoint. I. 2 hr. PR: Music 8 or consent. Sixteenth century counterpoint. 

254. Counterpoint. II. 2 hr. PR: Music 8 or consent. Eighteenth century counter- 
point. 

255. Major Project in Theory. Composition, or History. 2 hr. PR: Music 8. 

256. Upper Division Composition. 2 hr. PR: Four semesters Music 114, or consent 
based on scores submitted. Creative writing with emphasis on practical com- 
position for performance. May be repeated for credit. 

280. Survey of Operatic Music. I. 3 hr. PR: Music 43. 

281. Survey of Symphonic Music. II. 3 hr. PR: Music 43. 

282. Studies in Contemporary Music. I. 3 hr. PR: Music 43. 

283. Survey of Chamber Music. II. 3 hr. PR: Music 43. 

284. Collegium Musicum. I. II. 1-2 hr. Performance of outstanding musical works 
not in the standard repertory. Although open as a performance group to 
upperclassmen, graduate students will select appropriate vocal and instru- 
mental music, investigate modes of performance, prepare any necessary edi- 
tions, and direct rehearsals under supervision. May be repeated for credit. 

299. Recital. I, II. to 2 hr. Xot available for graduate credit. To be used to ful- 
fill applied major graduation requirement only when the student has achieved 
grade level 9. Students who have reached grade level 6 may receive 1 hour 
credit, which may not be used to fulfill graduation recital requirement. 



BEGINNING APPLIED MUSIC 

Class instruction at the beginning levels is provided for 1 hour credit on the 
following instruments and in voice: 

Woodwind— Music 80; Brass— Music 82; String— Music 84; Percussion— Music 
86; Piano-Music 150, Sections 30-49: Voice-Music 150, Sections 50-69. 



APPLIED MUSIC REQUIREMENTS 

Undergraduate Applied Music Requirements 

Applied grade levels for entering students are listed in the outlines of the vari- 
ous curricula. These made levels are based upon normal progress expected of stu- 
dents to enable them to fulfill necessary oracle level requirements for graduation. 
Students who do not meet indicated grade levels must make up their deficiencies as 
soon as possible, and are subject to probation. 

:tUSIC 207 



When the faculty feels the deficiencies are so meat and the student's musical 
talent so minimal that the possibility of fulfilling graduation requirements is im- 
possible, the student will be notified that his enrollment in the Division of Music will 
be terminated. 

Applied Music Majors 

Applied Music majors must complete at least grade level 3 in piano to be 
eligible for graduation. 

Applied Music majors must complete made level 10 on their major instrument 
to be eligible for graduation. 

Theory Major 

Theory-Composition majors must complete grade level 8 and Theory-History 
majors grade level 7 on their major instrument to be eligible for graduation. 

Music Education Majors 

Music Education majors must complete level 7 on their major instrument or 
voice to be eligible for graduation. Vocal emphasis majors must complete grade level 
3 in piano; Instrumental Emphasis majors must complete grade level 2B in piano. 
Vocal Emphasis majors who have keyboard as the applied major must complete grade 
level 4 in voice. Instrumental Emphasis majors who have piano as the applied major 
must complete grade level 4 on a band or orchestra instrument. 



COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

For a complete listing of levels in applied music, consult the office of the 
Division of Music. 



ART 

Each student entering the Division of Art is encouraged to become a member of a 
community of creative artists formed by the faculty and student body of the Division. 
The structure of the curricula is such that the art student is offered an opportunity 
to explore many of the important fields of practice in the fine and applied arts or to 
concentrate his efforts in one area if he so wishes. Each student is given preparation 
which is designed to promote the attainment of superior skills and creative insights in 
his own area of specialization. Close relationships between art students and the 
faculty are maintained so that students may be afforded the opportunity of sharing 
in the creative insights and personal works of a staff of professional artists and 
educators. 

Undergraduate programs in art are concentrated upon the idea of giving a 
full ranee of scholarly and studio experience to potential artists and teachers. The 
Division of Art is committed to a high standard of excellence in all of its activities. 
The annual juried exhibition and outdoor show of student works and the achieve- 
ments of its graduates attest to the success of its program in art. 

The Bachelor oi Art degree is conferred upon any student who satisfies all 
departmental and entrance requirement-, completes the Art or Art Education curricu- 
lum, and who complies with the genera] regulations of the University concerning de- 
grees. 

\ll candidates lor a degree in the Division of Art must establish a minimum 
average oi 2.0 (C) grade points per semester hour in art courses. In addition, they 
may be asked to present a portfolio of selected works lor examination and evaluation 
by a faculty committee. The committee is empowered to make recommendations re- 
garding the students' continuing to work toward a degree in art. 

The Division ol Art sponsors tin Art Club. 

JOS 



THE BACHELOR OF ART DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Art Degree is conferred upon any student who complies with 
the general regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance 
and departmental requirements, and complete a curriculum in art with an average 
of 2.0 (C) grade points per semester hour. 

Transfer students must establish transfer credit from other institutions during 
the first semester in which they are enrolled in the Division of Art. 



STUDIO CURRICULUM-VISUAL ARTS 

In this curriculum students are given preparation in the basic disciplines of 
the arts: drawing, design, art history, painting, sculpture and printmaking or graphic- 
arts. Students completing this program are prepared for work as professional artists 
in the fine and applied arts. If a student chooses, he may use electives for study in 
such specialized areas as: advertising design, typography, photography, interior de- 
sign, fashion design, ceramics, or other areas of interest which support his career 
orientation. Graduates with this background may prepare for careers in a wide range 
of cultural, commercial, and industrial activities. 





First 


Year 




Second 


1 Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Art 11 


3 


Art 12 


3 


Art 113 


3 


Art 114 3 


Art 30 


3 


Art 122 


3 


Art 126 


3 


Art 127 3 


Art 121 


3 


English 2 


3 


Art 105 


3 


Art 106 3 


English 1 


3 


Core Group C 


4 


Core Group C 


4 


Art 123 2 


Core Group C 


4 


Music 10 


3 


Core Group B 


3 


Core Group A 3 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Core Group B 3 
Phys. Ed. 1 



17 



17 



17 



IS 





Third 


Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Art 117 


3 


Art 118 


3 


Art 213 


3 Art 214 


3 


Art 211 


3 


Art History- 


3 


Art 216 


3 Art 217 


3 


Art History 


3 


Core Group A 


3 


Art 151 


3 Art 152 


3 


Core Group 


B 3 


Core Group B 


3 


Electives 


6 Electives 


6 


Electives 


3 


Electives 


3 









1.1 



15 



15 



15 



ART EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

In addition to the development of personal talents and skills, the student who 
chooses the Art Education curriculum may teach or may wish to follow some allied 
artistic career. They will be given preparation designed to develop leaders in the arts 
who can produce works of creative merit and products of good and valid design; who 
can participate in business activities through the applied arts; and who can communi- 
cate, as teachers, a creditable and strong background of knowledge and involvement 
in the arts. 

Art Education majors may qualify for specialization other than English with 
approval of the adviser. 



ART 



209 





Firs! 


Year 




Second 


i Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Art 11 


3 


Art 12 


3 


Art 113 


3 


Art 114 


3 


Art 105 


3 


Art 106 


3 


Art 126 


3 


Art 127 


3 


Art 121 


3 


Art 122 


3 


Speech 3 or 11 




English 6 


3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


or Drama 50 


3 


English 111 


3 


Core Group 


C 4 


Core Group C 


4 


English 5 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Plus. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Hist. 1 

Math. 21, 22 


3 


Math. 21, 22 
or 15 


2 










or 15 


2 


Phys. Ed. (W) 










Phys. Ed. (W) 


1 








17 




17 


17-18 




17-18 




Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Art 117° 


3 


Art 118° 


3 


English 142 


3 


Art 260 


3 


Art 220 


2 


Art 123 


2 


English, choice of 


Educ. 120 


4 


English 163 


3 


English 164 


3 


138, 139, 247, 




Educ. 124 


6 


English, choice of 


English, choice 


of 


248, 249, 




Educ. 168 


2 


166, 250, 




140, 141, 234, 


257, 258 


3 






or 270 


3 


244, or 245 


3 


English, choice of 






Soc. Sci. 1 


3 


Soc. Sci. 2 


3 


118, 278, 280, 








Educ. 100 


1 


Educ. 106 


3 


or Humanities 








Educ. 105 


3 






142 
Music 10 
Health Ed. 102 
Educ. 221 


3 
3 
2 
3 







18 17 17 

Total 137 hr. (Women) 135 hr. (Men) 



15 



"Art Education majors with emphasis other than painting in major area may take Art 151 
and 152 instead of Art 117 and 118 with approval of the adviser. 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Students successfully completing the Art Education curriculum will have satis- 
fied course requirements to teach both Art and English. 



I I 
12 
30. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN ART 

Creative Expression in the Fine Arts. I, II. 2 hr. Primarily for Elementary 
Education majors. An exploratory course designed to familiarize the student 
with the possibilities of creative expression through graphic media; to ac- 
quaint the student with the advantages and limitation of the various media; 
.Hid to investigate the adaptability of these media at various grade levels. 

Creative Expressions in the Applied Arts. I, II. 2 hr. A course similar to Art 1 
I mi employing materials such as clay, plastelin, paper, felt, gasso, plaster, and 
the like, as a means o| creative expression. 

or 111. Drawing. I, II. 3 hr. Freehand drawing in pencil or charcoal. 

or 112. Drawing. I. II. 3 In. Freehand drawing in pencil or charcoal. 

Appreciation of the Fine Arts. I, II. 3 hr. A stuck- of outstanding works ot 
.lit from limes p.isl .is well as from the present day. Topics treated include: 

the materials with which the artist works; sources of the art impulse; and the 

relations o| art to the chili/ation producing it. 



210 



105. Survey of Art. I. 3 hr. History of art from pre-historic times to the Renais- 
sance. 

106. Survey of Art. II. 3 hr. History of art from the Renaissance to the present. 

113. Painting. I. 3 hr. PR: Art 11, 12. Beginning watercolor. 

114. Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 11, 12. Beginning oil. 

117. Painting. I. 3 hr. PR: Art 113. Second semester watercolor. 

118. Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 114. Second semester oil. 

121. Fundamentals of Design. I. 3 hr. 

122. Fundamentals of Design. II. 3 hr. 

123. Lettering. II. 2 hr. Principles of design involved in lettering and their appli- 
cation. Offered alternate years. 

126. Modeling— Sculpture. I. 3 hr. Introductory course in modeling— sculptuiv. 

127. Modeling-Sculpture. II. 3 hr. Second semester course in modeling— sculpture. 

151. Special Problems. I. 1-3 hr. 

152. Special Problems. II. 1-3 hr. 

211. Figure Drawing. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Art 11 or 111, 12 or 112, and/or consent. 
Study of the construction of the figure. Drawing from the draped and par- 
tially draped model. 

213. Painting. I. 3 hr. PR: Art 113, 117, and consent. First semester advanced 
watercolor. 

214. Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 213 and consent. Second semester advanced water- 
color. 

216. Painting. I. 3 hr. PR: Art 114, 118, and consent. First semester advanced oil 
painting. 

217. Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 216 and consent. Second semester advanced oil 
painting. 

220. Art and the Schools. I. 2 hr. PR: 4 hr. of art including a minimum of 2 hr. 
studio. The function of art in the curriculum of various grade levels and a 
study of standards of achievement. 

221. Administration and Supervision of Art. II. 2 hr. PR: Art 220. Mainly for ad- 
ministrators and school principals who wish to become informed about art 
programs and the philosophies underlying them. 

225. Secondary School Art. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 11 or 111, 12 or 112, 121, 122, 113. 
114, and consent. Information and working skills desirable for the teaching of 
art on the secondary school level. Offered alternate years. 

241. Medieval Architecture. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Art 105, 106. A study of architecture 
from the time of Constantine to the Renaissance. Offered alternate years. 

250. Renaissance Painting. I. 3 hr. PR: Art 105, 106. A study of painting in Italy 
from Cimabue to Tiepolo; the Renaissance in Western Europe; a brief con- 
sideration of baroque and rococo painting as an outgrowth of the Renaissance. 

260. Modern Painting. II. 3 hr. PR: Art 105, 106. Developments in painting from 
the French Revolution to the present day. 

271. American Architecture. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Art 105, 106. Developments in 
architecture in North America from Pre-Columbian times to the present day. 
Emphasis will he placed on the architecture of the United States. Offered 
alternate years. 

275. Latin American Art. I or II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. From Pre-Columbian times to 
the present. Outstanding examples of the various periods will be considered. 
Offered alternate years. 

ART 211 



290. Study of Original Works of Art. 6 hr. PR: Art 105, 106, and consent of the 
Division Chairman. Directed study in the museums and libraries in an urban 
center such as Washington or New York; a study of the architectural develop- 
ments of the locality. Offered alternate years. 



DRAMA 

The WVU Division of Drama offers a professional program of theatre preparation for 
the student seeking artistic development for a career in theatre or in other fields 
where theatre skills are desirable. The four-year study leading to the Bachelor of 
Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree is nationally recognized for its heavy emphasis on artistic 
development. 

Courses in all areas of theatre are offered on the basic concept of providing 
formal classes for content and theory combined with practical application and experi- 
ence in the laboratory. The 80 to 100 play productions in five different theatre areas 
present the student with numerous opportunities to develop his own personal abilities. 
The diversified program in oral interpretation gives each student an opportunity to 
attain a high level of achievement in oral expression. 

The first phase of the new Creative Arts Center building just completed is 
one of the finest facilities in the nation for drama and includes some of the most 
modern equipment available for theatre experience and study. Performances of the 
Division of Drama includes plays from the classics, popular, Broadway musicals. 
originals, children's theatre and puppets. 

The aim of the drama curriculum is to provide the drama major with an 
emphasis on a special area of theatre and to supply a wide, professional scope of 
total theatre environment so that each student will have a sound, well-rounded 
knowledge of theatre art. As a result of this program of preparation, graduates of 
the Division are working in the professional theatre, radio, television, and in the 
movies. Many graduates have chosen careers in costume design, commercial sales 
work, make-up, department store style shows, lighting design, and similar areas in 
which theatre skills provide a unique advantage. The student interested in preparing 
himself for a career in drama will realize that here is one of the distinctive theatre 
programs in the nation. 

University Theatre. The Division of Drama produces, under tin 1 name Uni- 
versity Theatre, a complete season of faculty directed play productions. The season 
is open to the public under regular theatre management procedures with box office 
facilities offering the sale of season and reserved seat tickets. 

Studio Theatre. The Division of Drama maintains separate facilities lor the 
production of new and unusual plays, and for classical and experimental works which 
may not find a voice on the commercial stage. The studio program provides a train- 
ing ground for actors, writers, directors, designers, and technicians. Plays in this 
theatre an- directed by faculty or advanced students and are open or closed to the 
general public, depending on the purpose of the production. 

One-Act Play Productions. A regular laboratory performance schedule is main- 
tained for student directed and acted one-act plays. During the academic year as 
many as sixty productions are performed before student audiences. 

Oral Interpretation. Students enrolled in oral interpretation courses offer in- 
dividual and group recitals in regularly scheduled performances open to the public. 
A wide range of special programs are also offered to civic, religious and other 

organizations, including radio and television appearances. 

Verse Choir. The Division of Drama sponsors a verse choir lor major and non- 
major students with scheduled public performances. 

Children's and Puppet Theatre. Theatre majors operate a complete puppet 
theatre program offering plays and productions lor children. The Creative Arts Cen- 
ter operates a puppet-mobile project which tours in the state. 

National Collegiate Players. The Division sponsors a chapter of the national 

drama fraternity. 
212 



THE BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IX DRAMA 

The B.F.A. is conferred upon any student who complies with the general 
regulations of the University concerning degrees, satisfies all entrance and Division 

requirements, and completes one of the following options in the curriculum of the 
Division of Drama with a total average of 2.0 (C) grade points per semester hour. 

A. Acting-Directing-Oral Interpretation option. 

B. Design and Technical Theatre option. 

For admission to the junior year in the Division of Drama, a student must 
have established a 2.0 (C) grade-point average. 

Transfer students must establish transfer credit from other institutions during 
the first semester in which they are enrolled in the Division of Drama. 

Students are responsible for correctly fulfilling all requirements. Each student 
should review his course requirements both before and after every registration period 
so that errors or omissions will be detected immediately. 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

Certification in Drama is a part of the combined Speech-Drama teacher- 
preparation program under the College of Arts and Sciences. 



APPLIED DRAMA CURRICULUM 

The Applied program provides a Drama student with a very complete experi- 
ence in all of the basic theatre skills and crafts. In addition to the general scope of 
the program, the student may select an area of specialization in acting-directing, oral 
interpretation, or design-technical theatre. 





First 


Year 


Second 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Drama 75 


3 


Drama 50 3 


Drama 102 3 


Drama 103 3 


Drama 100, 


51 3 


Drama 100, 51 3 


Drama 150 


Drama 160 3 


Drama 101 


o 


Drama 176 3 


or Art 121 3 


Drama 180 3 


Drama 185 


3 


English 2 3 


Drama 160 3 


Drama 175 


English 1 


3 


Art 30 (Core A) 3 


Drama 180 3 


or Art 12, 112 3 


Speech 31 


3 


Core Group B 3 


Core Group B, C 3 


Core Group B, C 6 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Phys. Ed. 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 




18 


19 


15-16 


18-19 




Third Year 


Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Drama 104 


3 


Drama 161 3 


Drama 200 Level 


Drama 200 Level 


Drama 161 


3 


Drama 202 or 200 


Courses* 3 


Courses* 6 


Drama 200 L 


■evel 


Level Courses 3 


Drama 260 3 


Drama 260 3 


Courses* 


3 


Elective 3 


Drama 286 3 


Elective 3 


English 142 


3 


Drama 280 3 


Electives 6 


Core Group B 3 


Music 10 




Core Group C* 3 


Core Group B 3 




(Core A) 


3 








Core Group 


C* 3 









is 



18 



18 



15 



Students may include art and music courses taken as electives in addition to 
required courses as listed. All course programs must be approved by a faculty adviser 
in Drama. 



"Choice of courses depends upon which option the student 
mined in counsel with the adviser. 



following. This will he deter- 



DRAMA 



213 



ACTING-VOICE OPTION 

The Acting-Voice option provides special training in singing and acting alonj 
with genera] drama courses for the student seeking a career in musical theatre. 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 




Hr. 


First Sent. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Drama 75, 50 3 


Drama 75, 50 


3 


Drama 102 3 


Drama 180 3 


Music 1, 2 


2 


Drama 51 




3 


Drama 160 3 


Drama 160 3 


Music 150' 


2 


Music 3, 4 




2 


Music 150° 2 


Music 150* 2 


Music 150' 


1 


Music 150 1 




2 


Music 150* 1 


Music 150* 1 


English 1 


3 


Music 150 1 




1 


Drama 101 1 


Drama 100 3 


Art 30 (Core 


! A) 3 


English 2 




3 


Drama 175 1 


Core Group B,C 6 


Phys. Ed. 


1 


Core Group 
Phys. Ed. 


B 


3 

1 


Core Group B, C 3 
Phys. Ed. (W) 1 


Phys. Ed. (W) 1 




15 






18 


16-17 


18-19 




Third Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 




Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Drama 104, 


176 3 


Drama 104, 


176 


Drama 28, 103 3 


Drama 28, 103 3 


Drama 150 


3 


Drama 161 




3 


Drama 185 3 


Drama 260 3 


Drama 161 


3 


Drama 275 




6 


Drama 260 3 


Drama 280 3 


Drama 200 Level 


Music 150* 




2 


Drama 200 Level 


Music 150 2 


Course** 


3 


Music 138 






Courses** 3 




English 142 


3 


(Core A) 




3 


Music 150 2 




Music 150* 


2 


Core Group 


C 


3 


Core Group B 6 




Core Group 


C 3 













20 



20 



20 



11 



"Students must attain a final voice level of 7 and piano level of 2B. 
° "Choice of courses depends upon which option the student is following. This will be deter- 
mined in counsel with the adviser. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION IN DRAMA 

50. Oral Interpretation. I, II. 3 hr. Development of mental and emotional re- 
sponsiveness to written material. Techniques of communicating such material 
to others through oral reading. Open to all students. 

51. Vocal Techniques in Acting. II. 3 hr. Emphasis on vocal development and 
voice training for actors. 

75. Acting. I, II. 3 hr. Drills for developing muscular control for overcoming 
inhibitions, for rendering the body expressive of thought and emotion. Co- 
ordination of mind and body. Open to all students. 

100. Stagecraft. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture course in elementary problems of scenery con- 
st nut ion, scene painting, and stage lighting. 

101. Theatre Workshop. I, II. 1-3 hr. Laboratory for production of University plays 

and informal stimulation of interest in creative arts. Open to all students. 

102. Scene Design. I. 3 hr. Introduction to problems of creating stage settings. 
Elementary consideration of styles of production. Practice in techniques of 
scene design. 

L03. Theatre Lighting Design. I, II. 3 hi. basic techniques in stage lighting. Op- 
portunity for practical experience on University Theatre 1 lighting crews. 

10 1. History and Design of Costumes. I, II. 3 hr. A survey of historical stage cos- 
tuming with basic design including rendering techniques oi costumes for the 

stage. 



214 



150. Advanced Oral Interpretation. I. 3 hr. PR: Drama 50. Content and form of 
various types of literature, and advanced techniques for their oral presentation. 

100. Theatre Performance and Rehearsal Laboratory. I, II. 1 to 3 hr. PR: Consent. 
Participation in assigned theatre projects. Appreciation of creativity and per- 
formance techniques in theatre. Majors only. Max. credit 6 hr. 

101. Theatre Performance and Rehearsal Laboratory. I, II. 1 to 3 hr. PR: Drama 

160 or consent. Participation in assigned theatre projects. Appreciation of 
creativity and performance techniques in theatre. Majors only. Max. credit 
6 hr. 

175. Intermediate Acting. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 75 or consent. Continuation of 
acting techniques and development of acting skills. Emphasis on characteriza- 
tion in acting. 

176. Theatre Makeup. I, II. 3 hr. Lecture-laboratory course in art of stage make- 
up. Practical experience provided by doing makeup for University Theatre 
productions. 

177. Appreciation of Drama. I, II. 3 hr. Open to all students. An introductory 
course designed to develop an appreciation and understanding of drama as a 
fine art. 

179. Directed Theatre Activities. I, II. to 4 hr. Assigned theatre projects, super- 
vised by faculty. Non-majors. Maximum credit in any one semester 3 hr. 

180. Directing. I, II. 3 hr. Fundamentals of directing stage plays. Emphasis on 
work of director in relation to actor, stage, business, composition, movement 
and rehearsal schedule. 

185. History of the Theatre. I. 3 hr. An examination of the major periods of theatre 
history through study of the important playwrights of each era. 

202. Advanced Scene Design. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 100 and 102, or consent. Lecture 
and laboratory in theories of scene design for stage and television, including 
actual construction of designs. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students. 

203. Advanced Theater Lighting Design. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Student work in 
a specific area of technical theatre for advanced credit. May be repeated up 
to a maximum of 6 hours. 

204. Advanced Costume Design. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 104 or consent. Individual 
study in design styles and techniques. Survey of the position of costume design 
in theatre today. 

250. Advanced Problems in Interpretation. I. 3 hr. PR: Drama 50 and consent. De- 
signed to deal with individual problems of advanced students in interpretation. 

251. Professional Reading. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Intensive training in interpreta- 
tion. Designed to meet needs of individual. Full-length public recital pre- 
pared and presented. Limited enrollment. 

252. Art of Storytelling. S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Principles involved in effective pre- 
sentation of stories, with practical experience in classroom and before audi- 
ences. Stories of all types for adults and children studied. 

260. Theatre Performance and Rehearsal Laboratory. I, II. 1 to 3 hr. PR: Drama 

161 or consent. Participation in assigned theatre projects. Appreciation of 
creativity and performance techniques in theatre. Majors only. Max. credit 
6 hr. 

275. Advanced Acting. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 75 and consent. Characterization, 
script analysis, style, theories, and techniques. Designed to meet the needs of 

individual students. 

280. Advanced Directing. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 180 or consent. Emphasis on the 
work of the director as an integrating artist. Display of high level of pro- 
ficiency in direction of a one-act play required of all students enrolled. 

DRAMA 215 



281. Theatre Dialects. I. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Study and mastery of fifteen common 
dialects used in theatre, motion pictures and television. 

282. Creative Dramatics. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 75 or consent. The study and prac- 
tice- of creative dramatic- activity as a method oi learning and self-develop- 
ment lor children. 

2>S4. Puppetry. I. 3 hr. PR: Drama 75 or consent. A comprehensive survey of con- 
struction and manipulation techniques of puppets. Includes an evaluation of 
the role of puppetry in child behavior and therapy techniques. 

285. Advanced History of Theatre. II. 3 hr. Historical survey of theatre from 
primitive times to present. Includes both oriental and occidental theatres. 

286. Drama Criticism and Aesthetics. I. 3 hr. A survey of chief critical and aes- 
thetic theories of drama— ancient, modern, and contemporary. 

287. Styles of Acting and Directing. II. 3 hr. PR: Drama 180 and Drama 280, or 
consent. Extensive and intensive study of acting and directing styles. 

290. Play writing. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Development of creative ability in dra- 
matic composition. Study of techniques and problems of playwriting. Of cul- 
tural value, but primarily a writing course. 



216 



The College of Engineering 
And The School of Mines 



ENGINEERING 

Engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of the mathematical and 
natural sciences gained by study, experience, and practice is applied with judgment 
to develop ways of economically utilizing the materials and forces of nature for the 
benefit of mankind. 

The western world, and especially the United States, has often been char- 
acterized as a "technological society." This phrase reflects the great impact that engi- 
neering has had on western society. In almost every aspect of human enterprise, the 
activities of the engineer are playing an increasingly important role and these activi- 
ties will continue to have far-reaching social, economic and political consequences in 
the world of the future. 

Forecasts of the expected state of the world by the year 2000 suggest that 
large scale systems will be created for the development, control, and use of our 
natural resources; and that development will continue in automated manufacturing, 
synthetic foods, rapid transportation systems, space programs, defense systems, and 
bio-social systems having to do with medical advances, housing, community develop- 
ment and pollution control. Here engineering will play the major role. 

Society's needs in the decades ahead will demand engineering talent on a 
scale never before seen. The engineer will be called upon, not only to create, but to 
coordinate technological advances more effectively into large scale social systems 
such as vast metropolitan complexes. 

Old in tradition, but young in spirit, the College of Engineering was estab- 
lished in the last half of the nineteenth century, awarding its first four-year bac- 
calaureate degree in 1891. 

The College of Engineering is located on the Evansdale Campus, approxi- 
mately a mile from the Downtown Campus and one-half mile from the Medical Cen- 
ter Campus. The Engineering Center, which was occupied in 1961, has been care- 
fully planned to enable the College to offer a variety of educational experiences to 
engineering students. The teaching laboratories are equipped with modern instru- 
ments, machines and tools to improve and enrich the student's understanding of 
engineering principles and problems. Both analog and digital computer laboratories 
are available for classroom work. 

The College's programs are administered through eight basic engineering de- 
partments: Aerospace, Agricultural, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, Mechani- 
cal, and Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. Its undergraduate programs, long recog- 
nized by industry as ranking with the best in the nation, are accredited by the Engi- 
neers' Council for Professional Development. The curricula have been planned to 
give the student a balanced background in the basic sciences, engineering sciences, 
engineering analysis, humanistic-social studies, and engineering synthesis and design. 

This blend of science and practice has been designed to give the student the 
tools to solve today's problems and the background to develop the expertise needed 
for the future. 

217 



To assist the student in his education as a professional engineer, the staff of 
the College uses modern teaching techniques, including programmed material, guest 
lectures by visiting authorities, seminars, team project assignments, and other tech- 
niques to provide a breadth of experience. 

Modem graduate programs, dedicated to the development of engineering 
practice, engineering science and research, are offered in numerous creative special- 
ties. Both Masters and Ph.D. degrees are available. These exciting programs, where 
the frontiers of knowledge are explored through study and research, provide an aca- 
demic environment in which all programs— graduate and undergraduate— are con- 
stantly being updated to give the student the professional education needed in a 
technological-scientific society. 



MINES 

A major proportion of the management and research personnel governing the 
activities of our great mineral producing companies and corporations will come from 
the mining and petroleum engineering ranks within these organizations. The modern 
general trend in the mineral producing industry is to promote mining and petroleum 
engineers into top management positions; such as general managers, chief engi- 
neers, vice presidents, and presidents. Most of the 500 West Virginia University min- 
ing and petroleum engineering graduates have achieved prominent and dominant 
positions in the mineral extractive fields. The mining of minerals is one of our nation's 
most vital and important industries. 

Mining and petroleum engineering are professions which encompass a broad 
range of skill and activities. Mining and petroleum are technically specialized fields 
concerned with planning, supervising, and operating all types of mineral extraction 
operations from the surface as well as underground. 

Mining engineering is concerned with the production of our solid fuels— coal, 
lignite, and oil shale; with the metals— iron, copper, gold, aluminum, uranium, and 
others; and with the non-metallic minerals— limestone, diamonds, and others. Petro- 
leum and natural gas engineering is concerned with the exploration, drilling, produc- 
tion, and evaluation of oil and natural gas reservoirs. As a result, many career oppor- 
tunities exist in these fields in the United States and abroad because mining engineer- 
ing is used in so many aspects of the worldwide mineral industries. The petroleum 
and natural gas engineer is assuming an ever increasing role of importance in the 
production of the liquid and gaseous fuels as well as the management of the com- 
panies engaged in this activity. 

The West Virginia University School of Mines is indeed fortunate to be lo- 
cated in the heart of one of the great mineral producing areas in the United States. 
The proximity of the School of Mines to industrial, mining, petroleum, and natural 
gas producing areas provides its faculty opportunities for intimate participation and 
observations of current mineral producing activities. The resulting association of the 
faculty with industrial activities allows them to participate in research, industrial 
consultation, and professional mineral engineering societies. The knowledge and ex- 
pertise gained thereby permits them to achieve unique, unequalled mineral industries 
educational programs. 

Mineral engineering is a professional occupation, and as a rule can be entered 
only after a period of specialized educational preparation in well-organized Fields <>( 
knowledge which the WVU School of Mines offers. 

Students interested in attending the School of Mines may be admitted on the 
basis of examination or transcript from accredited high schools. High school grad- 
uates, in their transcript among other subjects listed, are required to present 4 units 
of English, 2 units of algebra, 1 unit of geometry, and Yi unit of trigonometry. Those 
who do not meet these requirements in mathematics may apply for admission to the 

218 



pre-mining curriculum. All students entering as first-term freshmen are required to 
take the American College Testing Program tests (ACT) and have the report of the 
scores sent to the University. This test is used for placement and no other test may be 
substituted for it. 

Various scholarships, awards, prizes, and loan funds are available to qualified 
students. Typical qualifications are: scholarship, need, ability, and performance. In 
addition, a cooperative plan is in effect whereby a student may work for the partici- 
pating companies for approximately one-half year, and attend the University the 
other half. The money earned, in most cases, is sufficient to defray all of his edu- 
cational expenses. Summer employment is also available. 

One of the nation's largest coal producing company's present policy is to hire 
any West Virginia University mining engineering student for summer employment, 
if he so desires. 

Several of the largest oil and gas companies located in West Virginia will pro- 
vide summer employment for students enrolled in the Petroleum Engineering De- 
partment of the School of Mines. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



For the purpose of administration and instruction, the College of Engineering 
is organized into the following departments: 



Aerospace Engineering (A.E.) 
Agricultural Engineering (Ag.E. 
Chemical Engineering (Ch.E.) 
Civil Engineering (C.E.) 
Electrical Engineering (E.E.) 



Mechanical Engineering (M.E. 
Industrial Engineering (I.E.) 
Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics (T.A.M.) 



For the purpose of administration the School of Mines is divided into the fol- 
lowing divisions: 



Mining Engineering (E.M.) 
Petroleum Engineering (Pet.E.) 



Mining and Industrial Extension 
Coal Research Bureau 



ECPD ACCREDITATION 

The Engineer's Council for Professional Development, a joint body concerned 
with the enhancement of the status of the engineer and the engineering profession, 
has been designated by its constituent bodies (American Society of Civil Engineers, 
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers. The American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engi- 
neers, The American Society for Engineering Education, American Institute of Chem- 
ical Engineers, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Council 
of State Boards of Engineering Examiners, and the Engineering Institute of Canada) 
as the co-ordinating agency for the accrediting of undergraduate engineering cur- 
ricula in the United States. 

Undergraduate curricula of the College of Engineering and the School of 
Mines are accredited by the Engineer's Council for Professional Development and in- 
clude: aerospace, agricultural, chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical, min- 
ing, and petroleum. 



ENGINEERING AND MINES 



>.M 



ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION 

Chester A. Arents, P.E., M.E., D.Sc., Dean of the College of Engineering. 
James H. Schaub, P.E. Ph.D., Associate Dean of the College of Engineering. 
George W. Weaver, P.E., M.S.M.E., Assistant Dean of the College of Engineering. 



FACULTY I\ ENGINEERING 

Aerospace Engineering 

Jerome B. Fanucci, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Aerospace Engineering. 

Jonathan M. Bennett, Flight Instructor in Aerospace Engineering. 

Larry W. Dooley, M.S.A.E., Instructor in Aerospace Engineering. 

Alvin D. Howell, M.S.A.E., Instructor in Aerospace Engineering. 

Yu Kao Hsu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering. 

Jerry J. Jester, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Aeros]iace Engineering. 

John L. Loth, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Director of 

Proimlsion Laboratory. 
Ellis Edwin Mood, Instructor (Flight) in Aerospace Engineering. 
Nathan Ness, Ph.D., Professor of Aerospace Engineering. 

Ahto Palm-Leis, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering. 
William Squire, M.A., Professor of Aerospace Engineering. 
Richard E. Walters, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Director 

of Aerodynamics Laboratory. 
Charles J. Whiston, Jr., Instructor (Flight) in Aerospace Engineering. 
Syed Yusuff, Ph.D., Professor of Aerospace Engineering. 

Agricultural Engineering 

A. D. Longhouse, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Engineering. 
Waldo E. Bell, B.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering; State 

Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist ( Retired ) . 
Edmond B. Collins, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering and 

Chief of Party. (Assigned to Egerton College, Njoro, Kenya, East Africa). 
Chester A. Cromer, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

( Assigned to Tanzania Agricultural College, Morogoro, Tanzania, East Africa ) . 
Walter H. Dickerson, P.E., M.S.Ag.E., Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
Robert G. Diener, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
William B. Easley, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. (Assigned to Arapai 

Agricultural College, Uganda, East Africa). 
Kendall C. Elliott, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
Hoy E. Emerson, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 
Gordon E. Ferguson, M.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. ( Assigned to Arapai 

Agricultural College, Uganda, East Africa). 
Charles R. Grafton, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

(Assigned to Egerton College, Njoro, Kenya, East Africa). 
Mvlo A. Hellickson, M.S.Ag.E., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering. 
Dennis E. Kluver, B.S., Instructor in Agricultural Mechanics. (Assigned to Bukalasa 

Agricultural College, Uganda, East Africa). 
Arthur W. Selders, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering; State 

Extension Agricultural Engineering Specialist. 
John L. Wagner, M.S.Ag.E., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering. 

(Assigned to Egerton College, Kenya, East Africa). 

220 



Robert O. Weedfall, M.S.E., Instructor in Agricultural Engineering. ( Climatologist 
stationed with Department of Agricultural Engineering in cooperation with 
U. S. Weather Bureau). 

Chemical Engineering 

Howard P. Simons, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Chemical Engineering. 
Richard C. Bailie, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
George L. Blackshaw, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 
William R. Boyle, P.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Harold V. Fairbanks, P.E., M.S.Ch.E., Professor of Metallurgical Engineering. 
Alfred F. Galli, P.E., M.S.Ch.E., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Dean O. Harper, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Paul R. Jones, P.E., M.Sc. Professor of Ceramic Engineering. 
Walter A. Koehler, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Director Emeritus. 
Duane G. Nichols, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Chin- Yung Wen, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Civil Engineering 

Emory L. Kemp, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineering. 

Wilfred H. Baker, P.E., M.S.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Jerry C. Burchinal, P.E., M.S.C.E., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Everett C. Carter, M. of E., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Roland P. Davis, P.E., Ph.D., Dean Emeritus, College of Engineering. 

Charles R. Jenkins, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sanitary Engineering. 

Lee Ellis King, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Benjamin Linsky, P.E., M.S.E., Professor of Sanitary Engineering (Air Pollution). 

Larry D. Luttrell, P.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Lyle K. Moulton, M.S.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Frank M. Noonan, B.S.Chem., Instructor and Director, Air Pollution Engineering 

Laboratories. 
Dennis H. Parr, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Byron E. Ruth, P.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
William A. Sack, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
James H. Schaub, P.E., Ph.D., Associate Dean and Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Roger K. Seals, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Eugene F. Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Frederick J. Wegmann, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
William J. Wilhelm, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Raul Zaltzman, P.E., M.S.C.E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Electrical Engineering 

Edwin C. Jones, P.E., M.S.E.E., Professor and Acting Chairman of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

M. Dayne AJdridge, D.Sc, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Wilford D. Baker, M.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
Edwin C. Barbe, M.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Walton W. Cannon, Ph.D., Visiting Lecturer in Electrical Engineering. 
Everette C. Dubbe, P.E., B.S.E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
T. W. Keech, Jr., M.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
George H. Patton, M.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 
Mason M. Peterson, P.E., B.S.E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

ENGINEERING FACULTY 221 



Mulukutla S. Sarin. i. l'li.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Marion J. Smith. V.l... M.S.E.E., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Nelson S. Smith, Jr.. P.E., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
Robert E. Swartwout, Ph.D., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 
Richard \Y. Young, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering. 

Industrial Engineering 

Raymond E. Shafer, P.E., M.S. I.E., Professor and Chairman of Industrial Engineering. 

Roger W. Berger, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Jack Byrd, M.S. I.E., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Charles L. Delaney, Instructor in Shop Practice. 

Steven J. Dodd, M.S. I.E., Instructor in Industrial Engineering. 

Samy E. G. Elias, B.Sc., Ph.D., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Robert D. Fowler, P.E., M.S. I.E., Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Donald L. Gochenour, Jr., M.S. I.E., Instructor in Industrial Engineering. 

George M. Tomko, Jr., P.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Howard W. Butler, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Mechanical Engineering. 

Harold Malcolm Cather, P.E., M.E., M.S.M.E., Professor Emeritus. 

Robert E. Eilers, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Hasan T. Gencsoy, P.E., M.S.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

James C. Goodwin, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Robert R. Lenhart, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Thomas R. Long, M.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

David E. McKee, P.E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Kenneth H. Means, M.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Desmond F. Moore, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

In Meei Neou, Ph.D., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Sidney H. Schwartz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Joseph F. Sladky, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Robert D. Slonncgcr, P.E., M.S.M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

J. Edward Sncckcnberger, M.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Emil J. Steinhardt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 

Edward F. Byars, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Theoretical and Applied 

Mechanics. 
Sunder II. Advani, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
Carl II. Cather, P.E., M.S., Professor Emeritus. 

Charles H. Evces, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
Russell H. Waynes, l'li.D., Assistant Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
Yu-Chung Lee, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Theoretical and Applied 

Mechanics. 
Warren G. Lambert, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
Helen L. Plants, P.E., M.S.C.E., Associate Professor of Theoretical and Applied 

Mechanics. 
Robert I). Snyder, Ph.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
James H. Stafford, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 

222 



George W. Weaver, P.E., M.S.M.E., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; 

Assistant Dean, College of Engineering. 
Donald T. Worrell, P.E., M.S.E.E., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 

Engineering Experiment Station— Administration 

Chester A. Arents, P.E., M.E., D.Sc., Director. 

James H. Schaub, P.E., Ph.D., Associate Director. 

Richard P. Smith, B.S.J., Assistant to the Director. 

Charles T. Holland, P.E., M.S.E.M., Dean of the School of Mines. 

Howard W. Butler, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Mechanical Engineering. 

Edward F. Byars, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics. 

Jerome B. Fanucci, Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Aerospace Engineering. 

Edwin C. Jones, P.E., M.S.E.E., Professor and Acting Chairman of Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Emory L. Kemp, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Civil Engineering. 

Alfred D. Longhouse, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing. 

Raymond E. Shafer, P.E., M.S. I.E., Professor and Chairman of Industrial Engineering. 

Howard P. Simons, P.E., Ph.D., Professor and Chairman of Chemical Engineering. 



FACULTY IN MINES 

Charles T. Holland, P.E., M.S.E.M., Dean of the School of Mines; Director of Mining 
and Industrial Extension; Professor of Mining Engineering. 

Richard W. Laird, P.E., M.S.E.M., Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering. 

Joseph D. McClung, P.E., M.S.E.M., Associate Professor of Mining Engineering. 

Abdel K. Kotb, P.E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering. 

Joseph W. Leonard, B.S.E.M., M.S., (Min Prep), Associate Professor of Mining Engi- 
neering and Director of Coal Research Bureau. 

Ernest J. Sandy, P.E., M.S.E.M., Associate Professor of Mining Engineering. 

James A. Wasson, P.E., M.S.P.E., Associate Professor of Petroleum Engineering. 

Roscoe E. Hanna, Jr., P.E., B.S., Supervisor of Industrial Extension. 

George H. Pudlo, B.S.E.M., Assistant Director of Mining Extension. 

Raymond H. Bohl, B.S.F.P.E., Assistant Director of Fire Prevention Extension. 

Ralph C. Bierer, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Donald M. Bondurant, B.E.M., Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Ulysses G. Carter, B.S., Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Jesse P. Cole, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Ralph D. Cole, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Luther B. Ferguson, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Lawrence D. Phillips, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Robert Baldwin, Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Harold L. Holstead, Instructor in Fire Service Extension. 

Peter P. Mintreas, B.S., Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Leland H. Winger, B.S.E.E., Instructor in Mining Extension. 

Coal Research Bureau 

Joseph W. Leonard, M.S., Director of Coal Research Bureau; Associate Professor of 
Mining Engineering. 

Charles F. Cockrcll, M.S.E., Supervising Research Chemist. 

Andrew J. Gaber, B.S.E.M., Research Engineer. 

MINES FACl I.I) 



Kathryn Huffman, M.S., Research Chemist. 

Kenneth K. Humphreys, P.K.. M.S.E., Senior Staff and Cost Engineer. 

William F. Lawrence, B.S., Associate Research Technologist. 
Charles R. McFadden, B.S., Associate Research Technologist. 
Richard B. Muter, B.S., Research Chemist. 
Harry E. Shafer, M.S., Supervising Research Technologist. 
I. any R. Stenger, M.S., Intsrunn utal Analyst and Instructor. 
Edwin B. Wilson, B.S.E.M., Research Engineer. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 

Any student, in order to be eligible to receive a Bachelor's degree in any 
branch of engineering for which degrees are offered, in addition to satisfying all en- 
trance requirements, shall be required to complete satisfactorily the number of se- 
mester hours of work as specified in the curriculum of the department leading to the 
degree for which the student is a candidate, plus the general requirements of physical 
education and English proficiency by the University for such a degree. 

A grade of "C" or better must be attained in each mathematics course before 
registration in a subsequent mathematics course is allowed. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

The four-year curricula are set up to give, in the first two years, a well- 
rounded training in the basic sciences of mathematics, chemistry, and physics, and 
in English. 

This is followed by such technical subjects as mechanics, thermodynamics, 
and electricity. The degree of emphasis varies somewhat with the curriculum followed. 
These courses bridge the gap between the pure sciences and the professional courses. 
In addition, courses in the humanities are given throughout the four years. 

In the third and fourth years, special emphasis is placed on the professional 
work of the engineer. In these years a certain number of credit hours are available 
for electives. 

The curricula are: 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Aerospace Engineering. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agricultural Engineering. 

3. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Chemical Engineering. 

4. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Civil Engineering. 

5. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Electrical Engineering. 

6. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Industrial Engineering. 

7. A four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Mechanical Engineering. 

8. Combined science and engineering curricula extending over five or more 
years leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Engi- 
neering. 

224 



CURRICULUM IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering 

Aerospace Engineering embraces the science and technology of all vehicles 
which are not bound to the earth. This includes all types of aircraft, rockets, missiles, 
and spacecraft, whether flight takes place in the atmosphere or beyond it. 

The Aerospace Engineering curriculum includes the disciplines encountered in 
the design of all of these vehicles. In addition to aerodynamics and structures, the 
aerospace engineer must now be familiar with propulsion systems and control and 
guidance systems. The curriculum may serve as a terminal program by incorporating 
design oriented courses for the technical electives, or it may be used as a preparatory 
program for advanced study by the selection of science oriented courses for these 
technical electives. 

Aerospace Engineering theory and laboratory courses are scheduled in the 
curriculum to complement each other, so that the greatest benefit may be derived 
from both. The laboratory courses also provide the students with the opportunity to 
become familiar with modern laboratory instrumentation and research methods. 

Aerospace Engineering 



First 


Year 






Second 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Chem. 15 4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Math. 17 




4 


Math. 140 3 


English 1 3 


English 2 


3 


Physics 102 




4 


Physics 124 4 


Math. 15 4 


Math. 16 


4 


M.E. 20 




3 


T.A.M. 102 3 


G. 1 Cr. 


Physics 11 


4 


T.A.M. 101 




3 


T.A.M. 104 3 


Phys. Ed. 1 1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Non-tech, elect 


3 


Non-tech, elect. 3 


Non-tech, elect. 3 


Non-tech, elect 


3 











15 



19 



17 



16 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


A.E. 116 


3 


A.E. 209 


3 


A.E. 207 


3 


A.E. 215 2 


A.E. 210 


3 


A.E. 211 


3 


A.E. 214 


3 


M.E. 230 3 


A.E. 221 


3 


A.E. 222 


4 


A.E. 224 


3 


Non-tech, elect. 6 


Math, elect. 


3 


E.E. 105 


4 


E.E. 205 


4 


Technical elect. 6 


M.E. 120 


3 


Speech 11 


3 


Non-tech. 


elect. 3 




Non-tech, elect. 3 






A.E. 200 


Cr. 





18 



17 



16 



IT 



Technical electives must be selected from the following in the 200 series: Aerospace Engi- 
neering, Advanced Mathematics, and Materials Science Engineering or related courses in the 
properties of materials. 

Core courses must consist of 12 hours of Group A and 12 hours of Group B. 

The English Proficiency Examination must be passed by all transfer students and those 
students with a grade of less than C in English 2. 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering is the application of engineering principles to agri- 
culture. Success in the application of engineering fundamentals to the agricultural 
industry requires knowledge of both the biological and physical sciences. Tin- pur- 
pose of the course is to give the student general training in agricultural and engi- 
neering fundamentals. Considerable stress is given to basic requirements of plant 
and animal life which affect engineering practices, but greater emphasis is placed 



ENGINEERING 



225 



on a thorough know ledge of those underlying principles and methods which are the 
foundation of all the engineering professions. 

Although the curriculum gives no opportunity for specialization, Agricultural 
Engineering is made up of four major fields. These are: Farm Power and Machinery, 
Farm Structures, Soil and Water Conservation, and Electric Power and Processing. 

Agricultural Engineering 





First 


Year 




Second 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Agronomy 2 4 


Biol. Sci. Elect. 4 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 102 4 


Physics 124 4 


Math. 15 


4 


Math. 16 


4 


Math. 17 4 


Math. 140 3 


M.E. 20 


3 


Physics 11 


4 


T.A.M. 101 3 


T.A.M. 102 3 


Phys. Ed. 




Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


C.E. 1 2 


M.E. 121 3 


Non-Tech. 


Elec. 3 


Non-Tech. Elec 


. 3 







18 



19 



17 



17 





Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Ag. Eng. 230 


3 


Ag. Eng. 201 


3 


Ag. Eng. 240 or 


Ag. Eng. 290 3 


M.E. 109 


3 


C.E. 115 


3 


Ag. Eng. 250 3 


Ag. Eng. 210 or 


Econ. 51 


3 


M.E. 112 


3 


M.E. 201 3 


Ag. Eng. 220 3 


E.E. 105 


4 


Econ. 52 


3 


Non-Tech. Elect. 3 


Non-Tech. Elect. 6 


T.A.M. 104 


3 


Eng. Sci. Elect. 


3 


Ag. Sci. Elect. 3 


Elective 3 






Non-Tech. Elect 


3 


Electives 6 





16 



18 



19 



15 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

The four-year course in Chemical Engineering has been developed to qualify 
graduates for positions in operation, development, design, construction, and manage- 
ment of manufacturing plants in which raw materials are subjected to chemical and 
physical changes to produce economically desirable products. 

The first two years of the curriculum includes English, basic mathematics 
through differential equations, inorganic and physical chemistry, classical and modern 
physics, and elementary mechanics. Courses in the humanities introduce the social- 
humanistic stem which continues throughout the remainder of the curriculum. 

The third year includes organic chemistry and engineering sciences comprising 
chemical engineering fundamentals of momentum, mass and heat transfer, thermo- 
dynamics and reaction kinetics, and electrical fundamentals. 

The fourth-year senior block introduces the student to the actual practice of 
chemical engineering including analysis, synthesis and design centered around a 
comprehensive plant design project, process dynamics, design of experiments, nature 
and mechanics of materials, and professional practice and ethics. Associated with 
this block is a written and oral communications sequence, with sequences in the 
humanistic-social stern and in technical electives. 



226 



Chemical Engineering 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


Chem. 17 


5 


Chem. 18 


5 


Chem. 143 


3 


Chem. 144 


3 


G. 1 


Cr. 


Math. 16 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


Hum. Soc. 




Math. 15 


4 


Physics 11 


4 


T.A.M. 101 


3 


( elective ) 


3 


Humanities 1 


3 


Humanities 2 


3 


Ch.E. 280 


2 


Physics 124 


4 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 






T.A.M. 104 
Ch.E. 280 


3 
2 



16 



20 



16 



18 



Third 


Year 




Fourth Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. Second Sem 


Math, elective 3 


E.E. 105 


4 


Tech. elective 2 Hum. Soc. 


Hum. Soc. 


Hum. Soc. 




Hum. Soc. (elective) 


( elective ) 3 


( elective ) 


3 


( elective ) 3 


Chem. 133 3 


Chem. 134 


3 




Chem. 135 1 


Chem. 136 


1 





Hr. 



10 



11 





Junior Block 




Ch.E. 201 


3 Ch.E. 202 


3 


Ch.E. 242 


3 Ch.E. 243 


3 



Ch.E. 270 



Senior Block 

10 Ch.E. 271 



10 



16 



17 



15 



16 



CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

In addition to those general and scientific subjects which form a sound foun- 
dation for any engineering career, this curriculum provides the basic training for the 
civil engineer. Since this field is too broad to be covered thoroughly in a four-year 
course, emphasis is on fundamentals. However, some specialization is available 
through electives in advanced courses in transportation, sanitary engineering, struc- 
tures, soil mechanics, or photogrammetry, which are available in civil engineering or 
related departments. 

A cooperative program with the West Virginia State Road Commission pro- 
vides an opportunity for eligible students to combine formal education with practical 
experience. 







Civ 


il En 


gineering 










First 


Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Chem. 15 


4 


C.E. 1 


2 


C.E. 101 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


English 1 


3 


C.E. 100 


1 


Math. 17 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


G. 1 


Cr. 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 11 


4 


T.A.M. 101 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


English 2 


3 


Geol. 1 


3 


Electives 




M.E. 20 


3 


Math. 16 


4 


Elective 




(non-tech.) 


6 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


(non-tech.) 3 






Elective 




Elective 












( non-tech. ) 


3 


( non-tech. ) 


3 












18 




18 




18 




18 












ENGINEERING 


227 





Third 


Year 




Fourth 


Year 


First Sent. 


Hr. 


Second Si m. 


Hr. 


/ irst Scm. Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


C.E. 115 


3 


C.E. 14fs 


3 


C.E. 147 


3 


C.E. 221 3 


C.E. 131 


4 


C.E. 160 


5 


C.E. 260 


3 


C.E. 271 3 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


C.E. 280 


3 


C.E. 270 


3 


English 126 or 


T.A.M. 104 


3 


T.A.M. 103 


3 


Mat. E. 250 


3 


Speech 11 3 


Physics 124 


4 


Elective 




Elective (tech.) 


3 


Elective ( tech. ) 3 






(non-tech. ) 


3 


Elective 

( non-tech. ) 


3 


Elective (sci. or 

eng'g. science) 3 
Elective 

( non-tech. ) 3 



17 



is 



18 



Six hours of a modern foreign language ma) be taken in place of English 126 or Speech 
11. However, English 126 will be required if the average grade in English 1 and 2 is "C" or 
less. 

Technical electives must include at least one course in Civil Engineering. 

Non-technical electives must be selected to meet University Core Curriculum requirements. 

Science and engineering science elective shall be selected from courses in the fields of 
geology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, geography, and approved engineering courses. 



CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

The course in electrical engineering has been developed for the purpose of 
giving the student who completes the course general training in engineering funda- 
mentals and broad training in the field of electrical engineering. Special training is 
available in the following fields as electives in the senior year: electric power, com- 
munications, control, solid state, and digital logic. 

In the first two years of electrical engineering, the work is limited mostly to 
those subjects which are essential as preparatory courses for the more technical courses 
in the third and fourth years. During the third year, fundamental courses in electrical 
engineering are introduced. Two courses in modern physics are included. In the 
fourth year the curriculum is mainly courses in electrical engineering, and electives. 



Electrical Engineering 





First 


Year 




Second 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. J 


Hr. 


Second Scm. Hr. 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Non-tech. Elect. 


or 


Non-tech. Elect. 3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 or 




English 2 


3 


E.E. 25 4 


G. 1 





M.E. 20 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 3 


Math. 15 


4 


Math. 1^ 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


Physics 125 3 


M.E. 20 or Non- 


Physics 11 


4 


T.A.M. 101 


3 


T.A.M. 104 3 


tech. Elect. 


3 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Non-tech. Elect. 


3 




Phys. Ed. 1 


1 













Non-tech. Elect. 3 



18 



16 



17 



16 



Non-technical electives shall !><• selected from courses approved for University Core Cur- 
rii ilium requirements. 

Technical electives shall be selected from the Following: Advanced Mathematics, Advanced 
Physics, ni an engineering course in die 200 series. 

NOTE: students enrolled in the Department of Electrical Engineering will not be allowed 
to register in any Electrical Engineering course unless the) have obtained a grade of "C" or 
In tt< i m .ill its prerequisite Electrical Engineering umivs. 

To i>'- eligible lor graduation, a student enrolled in the Department of Electrical Engineer- 
ing must attain a passing grade in all Electrical Engineering courses for which he has registered, 
except for courses with a grade of "\Y". 

228 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


s, cond Sem. Hr. 


Econ. 51 


3 


Econ. 52 


3 


E.E. 200 





E.E. 2 52 3 


E.E. 125 


4 


E.E. 152 


4 


E.E. 233 


4 


E.E. 270 3 


E.E. 126 


3 


E.E. 225 


3 


E.E. 251 


3 


Tech. Elect. 6 


Physics 126 


3 


E.E. 226 


3 


Math. Elect. 


3 


M.E. 121 3 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


E.E. 232 


4 


Non-tech. Elect. 3 


Non-tech. Elect. 3 










Tech. Elect. 


6 





16 



17 



19 



18 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

Industrial Engineering is a relatively new branch of engineering. The indus- 
trial engineer must combine his knowledge of engineering principles with everyday 
manufacturing operations in order that the product be produced in sufficient quanti- 
ties at minimum cost. The field of the industrial engineer is that of the process, pro- 
duction, and cost expert engaged in planning, organizing, improving, managing, and 
operating the various procedures in producing all kinds of manufactured products. 

The industrial engineering curriculum provides training for students interested 
in managerial and technical activities of engineering. 

Industrial engineering includes motion and time study analysis for work 
simplification and standardization, control of quality, control of quantity through use 
of production control techniques, and control of labor costs through use of such man- 
agement activities as job evaluation and wage incentives. 

Statistics has been increasing steadily as a tool in industrial engineering. One 
of its greatest contributions in recent years has been in the control of quality of 
manufactured products by statistical method. Recent additions to the curriculum pre- 
pare students for more advanced statistical analysis, as may be applied to production 
and costs as well as research. 

Industrial Engineering 





First 


Year 




Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Econ. 51 


3 


Econ. 52 


3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


G. 1 


Cr. 


Math. 16 


4 


Elective 




Elective 




M.E. 20 


3 


Physics 11 


4 


(non-tech.)* 


3 


(non-tech.)* 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Physics 102 


4 


Physics 124 


4 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 






T.A.M. 101 


3 


T.A.M. 104 


3 



15 



16 



17 



16 



Core 



"Elective (Non-technical) must satisfy requirements for both Group A and B, University 
Curriculum requirements. 



ENGINEERISG 



229 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scm. Hr. 


E.E. 105 


4 


E.E. 205 


4 


C.E. 115 


3 


I.E. 294 3 


I.E. 100 


3 


I.E. 131 


3 


I.E. 142 


3 


Mat. E. 250 3 


I.E. 140 


3 


I.E. 151 


3 


I.E. 254 


3 


Pol. Sci. 101 3 


I.E. 281 


3 


I.E. 214 


3 


I.E. 287 


3 


Electives 


I.E. 244 


3 


ME. 121 


3 


Electives 




(I.E. Tech.)** 3 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


Elective 




(I.E. Tech.) 00 3 


Electives 






( non-tech. ) ° 


3 






( non-tech. )° 6 



19 19 15 18 

° "Electives (I.E. technical) must be taken from any of the Industrial Engineering courses 
listed in the Courses of Instruction. 

A student wishing to specialize in Operations Research should take 6 hours of I.E. technical 
electives from the following: I.E. 215, I.E. 253, I.E. 284, Math. 257, and Math. 258. 

CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering is a profession in which its members work creatively 
to achieve practical results in terms of products and services that people need or 
want. In view of the wide range of products and services encompassed by Mechani- 
cal Engineering, it is not surprising that mechanical engineers find employment in a 
wide range of industries, as well as governmental agencies and educational institu- 
tions. It is thus very important that the Mechanical Engineering curriculum prepare 
students to deal effectively with a broad range of engineering problems, rather than 
narrow specialties. 

Mechanical engineers, while strongly oriented toward science, are not scientists. 
They must deal with reality in all its aspects and must be competent to use classical 
ingenuity to effectively practice their profession. The curriculum is designed to pre- 
pare students to this end and may be conveniently divided into four main parts, in- 
cluding courses in (a) mathematics, chemistry, physics, and English, which form the 
foundation of all engineering activity, (b) humanities and liberal studies which help 
to develop social consciousness and a sense of proportion, (c) the engineering sci- 
ences, such as thermodynamics and vibration theory, which extend the basic sciences 
to practical levels, (d) professional engineering subjects, such as machine, process 
and systems design, which emphasize the professional approach to project engineer- 
ing rather than the acquisition of specialized knowledge or skills. 

While the undergraduate curriculum is sufficiently broad to permit the grad- 
uate to select from a wide variety of employment opportunities, at the same time it 
contains sufficient depth to prepare a student to enter graduate school to seek an ad- 
vanced degree. As modern science and engineering become ever more complex, the 
desirability of graduate levels of preparation is being recognized by most advanced 
industries and government agencies. Students who develop an interest in engineering 
research or in academic teaching should plan to continue their education through 
tin M.S. or Ph.D. level. 

Mechanical Engineering 



First 


Year 






Second 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Chem. 15 4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 3 


Math. 15 4 


Math. 16 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


Physics 124 4 


English 1 3 


English 2 or 




T.A.M. 101 


3 


T.A.M. 102 3 


ME. 20 or Non- 


M.E. 20 


3 


English 2 or 


Non- 


T.A.M. 104 3 


tech. Elect. 3 


Physics 11 


4 


tech. Elect 


3 


Non-tech. Elect. 6 


Phys. Ed. 1 1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 


Non-tech. Elect. 3 




G. 1 


Non-tcch. Elect 


3 









15 19 17 19 

230 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


S^ cond Sem. 


Hr. 


M.E. 109 


3 


M.E. 112 


3 


M.E. 200 


2 


M.E. 202 


3 


M.E. 120 


3 


M.E. 125 


3 


M.E. 201 


3 


M.E. i lectives 


6 


M.E. 130 


3 


M.E. 135 


3 


M.E. 221 


3 


Tech. elective 


3 


Mat. E. 250 


3 


E.E. 205 


4 


M.E. 230 


3 


Elective 


3 


E.E. 105 


4 


Xon-tech. Elect 


3 


Xon-tech. 


Elect. 6 







16 16 17 15 



All students in Mechanical Engineering will be required to pass an examination on manu- 
facturing processes and machine tools prior to commencing the fourth year studies. Information on 
the content and nature of this examination may be obtained from the student's adviser. 

Xon-technical electives must be selected to satisfy University Core Curriculum require- 
ments. 

The elective courses in the eighth semester are to be selected by the student with the ad- 
vice and approval of the adviser. The courses selected should form a clear and consistent pattern 
according to the career objectives of the student. Students intending to continue their formal edu- 
cation in graduate school should plan for these courses as early as possible in the senior year. 



FIVE-YEAR CURRICULA 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in conjunction with a degree in engineering 
These curricula are designed to meet the needs of students who wish to receive 
a broader training than is provided in the four-year program. They also enable the 
student to take lighter schedules than are required in the four-year curricula. 

(A) Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science, to be conferred at the end 
of the fourth year, where the student's grade-point average is 2.5 or over, or at 
the time of the conferring of the engineering degree where the grade-point 
average is below 2.5. 

(1) The requirements of the first three years of any four-year engineering 
curriculum. 

(2) a. Twelve semester hours of one foreign language, where no secondary 
school entrance credits have been allowed, or 

b. Six semester hours at intermediate level, where two units of entrance 
credits have been allowed in the same foreign language. 

(3) Electives from the following groups, amounting to six semester hours 
where (2a) applies and twelve semester hours where (2b) applies. 

a. Not more than three hours each of English, history, and speech. 

b. Not more than six hours each in any one or more than the following 
groups: foreign language (other than specified above); journalism; com- 
merce, political science; and philosophy, psychology, and sociology. 

(B) Requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or mining or 
petroleum engineering, to be conferred on completion of the work of the fifth 
year. 



SPECIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULA 

1. Elective Groups for Students in Other Colleges. Candidates for degrees 
other than engineering degrees, and special students in any department of the Uni- 
versity, are permitted to elect subjects in the College of Engineering and the School 
of Mines, provided, in each case, they have had the subjects specified as prerequisites. 
Students who wish to take a general classical or scientific course of study before 
taking the engineering curriculum are advised to carry their mathematics as far as 

ENGINEERING 231 



called for by the engineering curriculum, and to take some elective work in the Col- 
Iege oi Engineering or the School of Mines. 

2. Partial Curriculum. Students who have not the time or are otherwise unable 
to take the full curriculum will be allowed to take a special or partial curriculum, 
consisting of such studies as they are prepared to take, provided such curriculum 
shall have been approved by the adviser. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

The University confers the following professional degrees: Aerospace Engineer 
(A.E.), Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.), Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical Engineer 
(E.E.), Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), Engineer of Mines (E.M.), and Petroleum 
Engineer (Pet.E.). 

The professional degree is conferred upon graduates of the College of Engi- 
neering and of the School of Mines of West Virginia University on the basis of practi- 
eal experience and study in absentia, the presentation of a thesis, and oral final 
examination. 

To be eligible, a candidate for a professional degree must have been in active 
practice of his profession for at least five years since receiving his first degree, and 
must have been in responsible charge of important work at least two years. 

Application for registration as a candidate for a professional degree should be 
made not later than October 1 in the academic year in which the degree is desired. 
Detailed regulations and registration blanks may be obtained from the Dean of the 
College of Engineering or from the Dean of the School of Mines. 



SCHOOL OF MINES CURRICULA 

The following engineering curricula are offered in the School of Mines. 

1. A four-year curriculum leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering of Mines. 

2. A four-year curriculum leading to the- Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Petroleum Engineering. 

3. A combined science and engineering curricula leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines or Bachelor of 
Science in Petroleum Engineering. 

In the four-year curricula the first two years of instruction are alike. During 
tin's period the student is given a thorough grounding in mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, English composition, and geology, as well as an introduction to history and 
economics. During the third and fourth years the student is given instruction in the 
engineering sciences as well as in the professional subjects pertaining to mining engi- 
neering and petroleum and natural gas engineering. Also, studies in the humanities 
are continued with the student being permitted to elect a reasonable proportion of 
the subjects to be studied. 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING OF MINES 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Engineering of Mines 

Mining Engineering deals with discovering, extracting, beneficiating, market- 
ing, and Utilizing minerals from the earth. The role of the mining engineer is quite 
diversified and there' are opportunities for technical specialization in prospecting, de- 
velopment, production, beneficiating, utilization, and marketing. Therefore, the min- 

232 



ing engineer must be well trained in the fields of mining and geology and also in the 
principles of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering as applied to the mining 
industry. With the present trend tow aid the use of engineers in industrial management 
and administrative positions, the mining engineer's training must also include eco- 
nomics, business, personnel management, and the various humanities. 

In this curriculum professional study includes geology and the engineering 
principles of blasting, materials handling, transportation, hoisting, water control, sur- 
face and underground systems of mining, roof control, ventilation, mineral prepara- 
tion, and plant design. Special consideration is given to the application of mining 
machinery with particular attention to power transmission and electric and hydraulic 
control systems. 

Special courses in the design of surface and underground mining installations 
give the student opportunity for using the engineering principles developed in pre- 
ceding phases of the course as well as for specialization. The student receives an in- 
troduction to the management and social aspects through courses devoted to econ- 
omic, social, governmental, labor, financial, and safety problems incident to the 
operation of a mining enterprise. 

In the fourth year the student may specialize in coal mining, ore mining, or 
other phases of mining engineering by proper selection of design problems and 
electives. He will be assigned an adviser who will assist him in this phase of the 
program. 

Local coal fields, mines, and preparation plants are used extensively for experi- 
mental, instructional, and field work. 



Engineering of Mines 





First Year 






Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 11 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


E.M. 1 





Math. 16 


4 


Geol. 151 


3 


T.A.M. 101 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


Hist. 2 


3 


Chem. 141 


4 


Econ. 51 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Core Group A 


3 


E.M. 106 


2 


English 5 


3 


Geol. 1 


3 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 






Core Group A 


3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 




— 











18 18 17 19 





Third Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Physics 124 


4 


E.M. 209 


3 


E.E. 205 


4 


E.M. 220 


3 


E.E. 105 


4 


I.E. 244 


3 


M.E. 121 


3 


E.M. 222 


3 


C.E. 115 


3 


Mat. E. 250 


3 


E.M. 213 


3 


E.M. 223 


3 


T.A.M. 104 


3 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


E.M. 241 


3 


English 6 


3 


E.M. 108 


4 


E.M. 212 


3 


Tech. Elect. 


3 


Tech. Elect. 


3 






Econ. 52 


3 






G. 100 






18 18 16 15 

Recommended Technical Electives 



E.M. 112 


3 


E.M. 229 


3 


E.M. 


215 


E.M. 217 


3 


E.M. 234 


3 


E.M. 


218 


E.M. 219 


3 


T.A.M. 103 


3 


Econ 


160 


Manag. 216 


3 


E.M. 228 


3 


M.E. 


230 



2 


E.M. 230 


3 or 4 


3 


I.E. 140 


3 


3 


E.M. 224 


1 to 3 


3 







MIXES 233 



CURRICULUM IN PETROLEUM ENGINEERING 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering 

Petroleum engineering deals with the discovery, production and transportation 
of oil and natural gas. Consequently, the petroleum engineer must be soundly 
grounded in the principles of geology as related to the occurrence, discovery, and 
production of natural gas and petroleum. In this curriculum this training is obtained 
by the study of geology as well as by the geological principles developed in the 
courses relating to oil field development and production. In addition, the petroleum 
engineer must be well grounded in the principles of oil and gas production as well as 
in the technology of transportation. This training may be obtained in the several 
courses pertaining to petroleum technology and in natural gas engineering and dis- 
tribution as well as the courses given in the engineering and basic sciences and mathe- 
matics. Today, there is a strong trend towards employing the petroleum engineer as 
supervisors, managers, and executives. Education for this aspect of his career is pro- 
vided by the courses in property evaluation, oil and gas law, as well as in economics 
and the humanities. In the senior year electives are provided by use of which the 
student may obtain additional training in geology or geophysics or in management of 
supervisory skills or in some special phase of petroleum and natural gas technology. 
Assistance in this phase of the program will be given by an adviser assigned to the 
student for this purpose. 

The School is particularly fortunate in that West Virginia is a petroleum and 
natural gas producing state and as a result local production and gas storage fields, 
secondary recovery projects, compressor stations and refineries provide excellent 
opportunities for field study of petroleum engineering problems, techniques, and 
methods. The petroleum laboratories of the School are well equipped for laboratory 
study of gas measurement apparatus, for core analysis, as well as for the study of 
drilling muds and for study of and experiments on drilling and pumping machinery. 

Petroleum Engineering 





First Year 






Second Year 




First Sem. 


Ilr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Chem. 15 


4 


Chem. 16 


4 


Physics 11 


4 


Physics 102 


4 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Math. 17 


4 


Math. 140 


3 


E.M. 1 





Math. 16 


4 


Chem. 141 


4 


T.A.M. 101 


3 


Math. 15 


4 


Hist. 2 


3 


E.M. 106 


o 


Econ. 51 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Elective 




Geol. 151 


3 


Elective 




Geol. 1 


3 


Core Group 


A 3 






Core Group 


A 3 


Phys. Ed. 1 


1 


Phys. Ed. 2 


1 











18 18 17 

E.M. 102 (5 weeks SUMMER) 5 



16 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Ilr. 


Second Scm. 


Ilr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Scrn. 


Hr. 


T.A.M. 104 


3 


Econ. 52 


3 


Pet. E. 206 


3 


I.E. 244 


3 


Physics 124 


4 


E.E. 105 


4 


Mat. E. 250 


3 


Pet. E. 216 


3 


English 5 


3 


T.A.M. 102 


3 


M.E. 121 


3 


Pet. E. 237 


o 


Pet. E. L06 


4 


Pet. E. 235 


3 


E.E. 205 


4 


English 6 


3 


C.E. 115 


3 


PetE. 236 


3 


Pet. E. 232 


5 


Tech. Elect. 


5 






Geol. 272 


3 






G-100 






17 19 18 

Recommended Technical Electives 



E.M. 207 


1 


T.A.M. 103 


E.M. 215 


o 


Geol. 161 


E.M. 230 


3 or 4 


M.E. 230 


Pet. E 2 11 


4 





16 



3 


Pet.E. 243 


3 


Geol. 2 


1 


3 


Pet. E. 240 


3 


Geol. 170 


2 or 3 


3 


Pet. E. 212 


3 


l.K. 281 


3 






COURSES IN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 
A.E. 

116. Introduction to Flight Vehicles. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 20, Physics 102, and/or cone: 
Math. 140. Discussion of flight vehicles of the past, present, and future. Intro- 
duction to the methods of graphical communication, production, and fabrica- 
tion used in the aerospace industry. Solution of aerospace problems by graphi- 
cal, digital, and analog methods. 2 hr. lee, 3 hr. lab. 

200. Inspection Trip. (Credit). 

203. Applied Aerodynamics. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 209. Chordwise and spanwise airload 
distribution for plain wings, wings with aerodynamic and geometric twist, 
wings with deflected flaps, and wings with ailerons deflected. Section in- 
duced drag characteristics. 3 hr. lee. 

207. Flight Vehicle Design. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 209. Preliminary design of flight ve- 
hicles. Vehicles are designed with regard for performance and stability re- 
quirements, considering aerodynamics, weight and balance, structural arrange- 
ment, configuration, guidance, and propulsive effects. Layout drawings and 
calculations are combined in a preliminary design report. 1 hr. lee, 6 hr. lab. 

209. Flight Mechanics. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 221. Performance estimation with emphasis 
on fixed wing aircraft. Fundamental concepts of stability and control of air- 
craft. 3 hr. lee. 

210. Flight Vehicle Structures I. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 102. Strength of thin walled 
structures in bending, shear, and torsion. Strain energy and application of 
Castigliano's theorem to bending of rings and curved bars, and to analysis of 
frames. Principle of Virtual Work and its application to beam and truss de- 
flections and to statically indeterminate structures. 3 hr. lee. 

211. Flight Vehicle Structures II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 210. Tension fields and the de- 
sign of Wagner beam. Buckling of compression structures: bars, sandwich 
columns, torsional instability of columns, wrinkling in sandwich construction, 
plates, shells and stiffened panels. Design for minimum weight. Introduction 
to thermal stresses. Failure by fatigue and fracture. 3 hr. lee. 

212. Design of Flight Structures I. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 207, 211. Structural design and 
analysis of flight vehicle members. Layout and detail design of specified com- 
ponents are required. 1 hr. lee., 6 hr. lab. 

214. Experimental Fluid Dynamics I. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 222. Subsonic and supersonic 
wind tunnel testing methods and practice. Experiments include the following 
measurements: pressure distribution on bodies, boundary layer determination, 
turbulence measurements, force tests, and stability and performance deter- 
minations. Corrections for scale and jet boundary effects. Test design, data 
analysis, and engineering report preparation. 2 hr. lee, 3 hr. lab. 

215. Experimental Flight Vehicle Structures. 2 hr. PR: A.E. 211. Strain gage tech- 
niques and instrumentation, stress-strain curves of materials. Tests on box 
beam in bending and torsion, stiffened panels, stiffened and unstiffened cyl- 
inders in compression, vibration of beams, photoelastic method of stress analy- 
sis. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

217. Design of Flight Structures II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 211. Analysis and detail design 
of simple fittings, beams, welded structures, forgings, castings. Methods of 
production and fabrication. 1 hr. lee, 6 hr. lab. 

218. Aeroelasticiry. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 210. The study of vibrating systems of single 
degree and multiple degrees of freedom, flutter theory and modes of vibra- 
tion, torsional divergence and control reversal. 3 hr. lee. 

ENGINEER1XC 235 



219. Introduction to Research. 1-3 hr. PR: Senior standing and consent. An intro- 
duction to the methods of organizing theoretical and experimental research. 
Formulation of problems, project planning, and research proposal preparation. 

220. Research Problems. 2-6 hr. PR: A.E. 219. Performance of the research pro- 
ject as proposed in A.E. 219. Project results are given in written technical 
reports, with conclusions and recommendations. 

221. Fluid Dynamics I. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Properties of the fluid medium, di- 
mensional analysis, hydrostatics, kinematics and dynamics of a fluid field, 
perfect fluid flow about a body, complex potential function, conformal trans- 
formation. 3 hr. lee. 

222. Fluid Dynamics II. 4 hr. PR: A.E. 221, M.E. 120. Thin airfoil theory, finite 
wing theory. Introduction to compressible, nonviscous fluids, isentropic flow, 
Prandtl-Meyer expansion, shock waves, airfoils in compressible flow, small 
perturbation theory, viscous incompressible flow, boundary layer, exact and 
integral solutions, introduction to turbulence. 4 hr. lee. 

224. Flight Vehicle Propulsion. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 222 or consent. Equilibrium com- 
bustion thermodynamics. Quasi one dimensional flow with friction and total 
temperature change. Thermodynamics of aircraft engines. Aerodynamics of 
inlets, combustors, nozzles, compressors and turbines. Performance of rockets. 
Ideal rocket analysis. 3 hr. lee. 

225. Guided Missile Systems. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 222, and/or cone: A.E. 224. Design 
philosophy according to mission requirements. Preliminary configuration and 
design concepts. Aerodynamics effects on missiles during launch and flight. 
Ballistic missile trajectories. Stability determination by analog simulation. Per- 
formance determination by digital and analog simulation. Control, guidance, 
and propulsion systems. Operational and reliability considerations. 3 hr. lee. 

226. Fluid Dynamics IV. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 222. Shock tube theory and applications. 
Introduction to kinetic theory, the calculation of viscosity and thermal con- 
ductivity. Fundamentals of hypersonic flow and the determination of mini- 
mum drag bodies. 3 hr. lee. 

227. Advanced Topics in Propulsion. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 224 or consent. Special prob- 
lems of thermodynamics and dynamics of aircraft power plants. Chemical 
rocket propellants and combustion. Rocket thrust chambers and nozzle heat 
transfer. Nuclear rockets. Electrical rocket propulsion. 3 hr. lee. 

230. Flight Testing. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 209. Applied flight test techniques and instru- 
mentation systems. Instrument, calibration methods, determination of static 
performance characteristics, and introduction to stability and control testing 
based on flight test of Cessna Super Skywagon airplane. Flight test data 
analysis and report preparation. 1 hr. lee., 6 hr. lab. 

256. Experimental Fluid Dynamics II. 3 hr. PR: A.E. 214. Continuation of A.E. 
214 with increased emphasis on dynamic measurements. Shock tube/tunnel 
and subsonic and supersonic measurements. Experiments include optical tech- 
niques, heat transfer to models, and viscous flow measurements. Error analysis 
of test data. 2 hr. lee, 3 hr. lab. 

'258. Space Mechanics. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140, T.A.M. 101. An introduction of flight 
in and beyond the earth's atmosphere b\ space vehicles. The laws of Kepler 
and Orbital theory. Energy requirements For satellite and interplanetary travel. 
Exit from and entry into an atmosphere. 3 hr. rec. 

280. Aerospace Problems. 1-6 hr. Upper division and graduate. 

299. Thesis. 2-6 hr. PR: Senior standing and permission. 



•May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 



236 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Ag.E. 

180, 181. Assigned Topics. 1-3 hr. per sem. 

200. Seminar. 1 hr. PR: Senior standing. 

201. Agricultural Structures. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 102. Structural design and func- 
tional requirements of agricultural buildings. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

210. Application of Electricity to Agriculture. 3 hr. PR: I .1 . L05. Economic appli- 
cation of electric light, heat, and power. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

220. Agricultural Process Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115, M.E. 121. Application 
of the fundamentals of engineering to agricultural engineering processes. 2 hr. 
rec, 1 hr. lab. 

230. Farm Power. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 121. Fundamental theories underlying design 
and operation of internal combustion engines used in agriculture. 3 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. 

240. Hydrology. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. The study of a hydrologic cycle with emphasis 
on precipitation and runoff as related to design of hydraulic structures, soil 
and water conservation, and flood control. 3 hr. rec. 

241. Physical Climatology. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Physical principles underlying the 
variations and changes in climate: climate controls; elements of micro- 
climatology; engineering applications and uses of climatic data. 3 hr. rec. 

250. Soil and Water Conservation. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Engineering principles and 
practices in conservation, utilization, and management of soil and water re- 
sources. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

290. Elements of Machinery Design. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 201. Design requirements for 
construction, principles of operation and adequate adjustment of agricultural 
machines and principles of testing agricultural equipment. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Ch.E. 

201. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 101, T.A.M. 104, 
Math. 140. Review of vector and tensor algebra; viscosity; method of shell 
balances; equations of continuity, motion, and energy; Navier-Stokes equation; 
turbulent flow; flow through porous media; microscopic momentum balances; 
boundary layer; heat conduction in solids; convective heat transfer; boiling 
and condensation; radiation; diffusion of mass; film and penetration theory; 
analogies among heat, mass, and momentum transfer. 3 hr. rec. 

202. Chemical Engineering Fundamentals. 3 hr. Continuation of Ch.E. 201. 3 hr. 
rec. 

210. Process Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Ch.E. 202. Process equipment calculations for 
unsteady state. Determination of maximum and minimum process conditions. 
Economics of processing methods. 3 hr. rec. 

224. Process Development. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 134, 144, Ch.E. 202 and 243. De- 
velopment of process systems from the modified unit operations-unit process 
concept. Use of thermodynamics and kinetics in the evaluation of system re- 
quirements and performance. 3 hr. rec 

242. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 hr. PR: Chem. 144. 
Material and energy balances; internal energy levels; statistical distributions 
and statistical evaluation of thermodynamic functions; empirical evaluation of 

ENGINEERING 237 



thermodynamic functions; second law of thermodynamics; thermodynamic 
properties of solutions and solid phases; chemical and physical equilibria. 
Kinetics of simple and complex chemical reactions: development of rate equa- 
tions. Kinetics ol vapor-catalytic reactions; development of rate equations and 
mechanisms of reactions; backmixing. 3 hr. rec. 

243. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 hr. Continuation of 
Ch.E. 242. 3 hr. rec. 

27o. 271. Chemical Engineering Professional Block. 10 hr. each. PR: Completion 
of all technical courses prescribed for the first three years. Professional aspects 
of Chemical Engineering involving analysis, synthesis and design, process dy- 
naniics. design of experiments, materials, engineering, design and computation 
laboratories, and seminar on engineering practice and ethics. Includes a com- 
prehensive plant design project. Thirty-five hours per week divided between 
lecture, recitation, computation and experimental laboratory. The Engineer- 
in-Training examination is required. 

280. Chemical Engineering Problems. 1-6 hr. For juniors, seniors, and graduate 
students. May be used to correct deficiencies preparatory or following courses 
such as Ch.E. 270 and 271 or for students in other disciplines desiring to take 
only a portion of a course. 

284. Industrial Instrumentation and Control. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. Discussion of 
process characteristics, theory and application of measuring means. Theory, 
modes and application of automatic control. Selection and characteristics of 
final control elements. 3 hr. rec. 

297. Thesis. 2-5 hr. A problem in chemical engineering or industrial chemistry is 
selected for investigation. A carefully prepared report is required. Open only 
to qualified seniors. 6-15 hr. lab. 

Materials Science Engineering 

Mat.E. 

'250. Materials Science Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Physics 124 or 125. Includes a study 
of the internal structures of metals, ceramics, and organic materials and the 
dependence of properties upon these structures. Also the behavior of materials 
under conditions involving mechanical stresses, thermal reactions, corrosion, 
electromagnetic fields and radiation. 3 hr. rec. 

263, 264. Principles of Materials Engineering. 3 hr. each. PR or cone: Mat.E. 250. 
Theory and fundamental principles involved in the development and produc- 
tion of engineering materials from their basic sources. Recommended for non- 
majors. 3 hr. rec. 

Nuclear Engineering 

Nuc.E. 

'200. Introductory Nuclear Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Physics 124 or 125. Includes 
elementary nuclear physics necessary lor understanding nuclear engineering. 
Design and operation of nuclear reactors, shielding, instrumentation, health 
physics, fuel cycles, uses of radioactive isotopes, nuclear propulsion. 3 hr. rec-. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 
C.E. 

°1. Surveying. 2 hr. PR: Math. 4. Elementary theory of measurement of distance, 
direction, and difference in elevation, Field work with transit, tape, level, 
stadia, and plane table. Office computation and plotting. 1 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

°M;iy be taken ;is undergraduate work 1>> students in other colleges and schools. 



238 



*5. Land Surveying. 4 hr. PR: Math. 4. Primarily for forestry students. Theory 
and practice with compass, transit, level, stadia, and plane table; computations 
of area; astronomical observations; map plotting. 2 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. 

°6. Topographic Mapping. 2 hr. PR: C.E. 5. Primarily for forestry students. Topo- 
graphic maps; surveys for roads and property lines; U.S. Public Land Surveys; 
practice in lettering, plotting, and inking of topographic maps. 1 hr. rec, 3 
hr. lab. 

100. Introduction to Civil Engineering. 1 hr. PR: Freshman standing. A survey of 
the historical foundations of civil engineering and the role of the profession 
in the future. The basic areas of civil engineering will be introduced and dis- 
cussed to familiarize the student with the opportunities inherent in civil engi- 
neering careers. Introduction to the digital computer and its application to 
civil engineering problems. 3 hr. rec. and lab. 

101. Survey Engineering. 4 hr. PR: C.E. 1. Theory of measurements and errors; 
introduction to least squares adjustments; field astronomy for determination 
of latitude and azimuth; horizontal and vertical curves; easement curves; 
earthwork volumes; triangulation; boundary' surveying; omitted measurements; 
partition of area. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

*115. Fluid Mechanics. 3 hr. PR or cone: T.A.M. 104. Fluid statics, laminar and 
turbulent flow of compressible and incompressible fluids, flow measurements, 
open channel flow, and kinetics of fluids. 3 hr. rec. 

131. Highway Engineering. 4 hr. PR: C.E. 101. Highway administration, econ- 
omics, and finance; planning and design; subgrade soils and drainage; con- 
struction and maintenance. Design of a highway. Center line and grade pro- 
jections, earthwork and cost estimate. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

141. Railway Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 101. Development and importance of the 
railroad industry. Principles of location, construction, operation, and mainte- 
nance. 3 hr. rec. 

146. Sanitary Engineering I. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Hydrology as applied to water 
and waste systems. Design of water distribution and waste water systems. 
The study and partial design of water and waste water treatment facilities. 

2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

147. Sanitary Engineering II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Examination of water and waste 
water, water treatment, waste water treatment and special problems in public 
health, air pollution and radioactivity. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

160. Structural Analysis I. 5 hr. PR: T.A.M. 101 and 102. Analysis of stresses and 
deflections in statically determinate structures caused by fixed and moving 
loads. Study of influence lines and loading criteria for beams, and plane and 
space framed structures. Application of electronic computer techniques to 
structural problems. 4 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

210. Photogrammetry. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 101. Geometry and interpretation of the 
aerial photograph; flight planning; radial-line control; principles of stereo- 
scopy; plotting instruments. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

211. Geodesy. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 101 and Math. 16. Precise base line measurements, 
triangulation and leveling, geodetic astronomy; figure of the earth, map pro- 
jections; rectangular coordinate systems; least squares adjustments; gravity. 

3 hr. rec 

221. Engineering Hydraulics. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Fundamental principles of flow, 
similitude, flow measurement, water hammer and surging, channel transitions, 
gradually varied flow, wave motion and sediment transportation. Design of 
various elements of hydraulic structures. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

"May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 

ENGINEERING 239 



222.. Open Channel Flow. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. An analysis of the hydraulic prob- 
lems associated with natural waterways, man made waterways, and the design 
of the hydraulic structures of open channels. 3 hr. rec. 

231. Concrete and Aggregates. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 131, T.A.M. 103. Considerations and 
methods for the design of concrete mixes. Effect of air entraining agents and 
other additives. Studies of the influence of aggregate properties on the design 
and performance of concrete mixtures. An analysis of the methods of testing 
commonly used for concrete and aggregates and the significance of these tests. 
3 hr. rec. 

232. Principles of Transportation Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 131 or consent. A 
basic approach to the problem of integrated transportation systems from the 
standpoint of assembly, haul, and distribution means. Analysis of the char- 
acteristics of the transport equipment and traveled way. Power requirements, 
speed, stopping, capacity costs, economics of location and route selection will 
be discussed. Future technological developments and innovations will be con- 
sidered. 3 hr. rec. 

233. Construction Methods. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 131 or equiv. The study of construction 
methods, equipment, and administration with particular emphasis on the in- 
fluence of new developments in technology. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

234. Introduction to Traffic Engineering. 3 hr. This course will provide instruction 
in the purpose, scope and methods of traffic engineering. Emphasis will be 
placed upon the three basic elements of the transportation system, i.e. the 
human, the vehicle, and the roadway. The characteristics of each element and 
the interactions between the elements will be studied. The laboratory will be 
devoted to conducting simple traffic studies, solving practical problems, and 
designing traffic facilities. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

-251. Public Health Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 146 or 147 or consent. The engi- 
neering aspects involved in the control of the environment for the protection 
of the health and the promotion of the comfort of man. Discussions will in- 
clude communicable disease control, milk and food sanitation, air pollution, 
refuse disposal, industrial hygiene, and radiological health hazards. 3 hr. rec. 

252. Water Resources Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. Design of water-resources 
systems. The interrelationship between economic objectives, engineering 
analysis and government agencies. 3 hr. rec. 

260. Structural Analysis II. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 160. An introduction to the fundamental 
theory of statically indeterminate structures. General theory of continuity and 
iterative and energy methods applied to the analysis of indeterminate beams 
and frames. 3 hr. rec. 

261. Statically Indeterminate Structures. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 260. Advanced topics in 
indeterminate structural analysis for trusses and nonprismatic members. 3 hr. 
rec. 

270. Structural Design I. 3 hr. PR or cone: C.E. 260. Theory and design of re- 
inforced concrete members. Design considerations for concrete bridges and 
buildings. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

271. Structural Design II. 3 hr. PR or cone: C.E. 260. Design of steel bridge and 
building structures. Welded, riveted, and bolted connections; simple and 
moment-resistant connections; cost estimates. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

272. Plastic Design of Steel Structures. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 260 or consent. The funda- 
mental concepts of the plasticity of steel. Analysis of structures for ultimate 
load. The influence of axial forces, shear forces, and local buckling on the 
plastic moment. Study of structural connections and deflections. Steel struc- 
ture design. 3 hr. rec 

273. Prestressed Concrete. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 270. The analysis and design of determi- 
nate and indeterminate prestressed beams and frames. 3 hr. rec 

240 



274. Timber Design. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 160 and For. 232. Emphasis on the funda- 
mentals of modern timber design and analysis. Topics to be presented include 
a review of wood properties, the design of beams, columns, arches, trusses and 
pole structures using dimensional lumber, glue-laminated and plywood com- 
ponents. Detailed study of connections using nails, shear connectors and ad- 
hesives. 3 hr. rec. 

275. Reinforced Concrete. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 160. Theory and design of slabs, beams, 
columns, footings, retaining walls, and concrete buildings, with emphasis on 
ultimate load design. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

280. Soil Mechanics. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 115. T.A.M. 101. Origins and distribution of 
soils, classification of soils, fundamental soil properties, and stresses in -oils 
Subsurface exploration. Introduction to foundations design and the design and 
construction of earth structures. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

281. Foundations Engineering. 3 hr. PR: C.E. 131, 280. Soils exploration and the 
design and analysis of engineering foundations. Particular emphasis on earth 
pressures and the design of retaining walls, studies of bracing systems and the 
elements of shallow and deep foundations for bridges and buildings. Move- 
ment of water through soil structures and control of water in excavations. 
3 hr. rec. 

290. Civil Engineering Problems. 1-4 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

E.E. 

°25. Electric Circuits I. 4 hr. PR: Math. 17, Physics 102. Basic concepts, non- 
linear elements, introduction to steady state electrical circuit theory (d-c and 
a-c), Ohm's law, Kirchhoff's laws, circuit analysis theorems, phasor algebra 
and its application to a-c circuit analysis. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

'105. Electrical Fundamentals. 4 hr. PR: Math. 140, Physics 102. Fundamental 
principles of electric and magnetic circuits. Induced and generated electro- 
motive force. Fundamental a-c circuit analysis. Polyphase systems. Elementary 
electronics. (Primarilv for non-electrical engineering students.) 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. 
lab. 

M25. Electric Circuits II. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 25, Math. 140. Complex frequency con- 
cept, Laplace transformation, transient analysis of both d-c and a-c circuit 
analysis. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

426. Electric and Magnetic Fields I. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 25, Math. 140, Physics 102. 
Electric scalar potential; line integrals; the vector concepts of gradient, diver- 
gence and curl; flux lines and potential theory; the electric dipole, polariza- 
tion; electric and magnetic fields of symmetrical geometrical systems; mag- 
netic vector potential; ferromagnetism; elements of field mapping; summary 
in Maxwell's equations. 3 hr. rec. 

'152. Electronics I. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 125, 126. The study and use of semi-conductor 
devices and vacuum tubes as circuit elements; rectifiers and voltage amplifiers. 
3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

180. Electrical Problems. 1-3 hr. For sophomore and junior students. 

200. Seminar. (Credit). PR: Senior standing. Special material and projects. 

205. Electrical Fundamentals. 4 hi. PR: E.E. 105. Fundamentals and operating 
characteristics of electrical machines and transformers. Electron tube, photo- 
tube, and transistor characteristics. Electronic circuits. (Not open to electrical 
engineering students.) 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

"May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 

ENGINEERING 241 



210. Electronics for Scientists. 3 hr. PR: General Physics and Calculus or Consent. 
A special course for chemists, physicists, medical researchers and other re- 
h workers having a limited background in electronics. The material 
covered will begin with electrical and electronic fundamentals and leads sys- 
tematically into servomechanisms, operational amplifiers, digital circuits, and 
other devices used in current laboratory research and control problems. (Not 
open to Engineering students.) 1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. 

*225. Electric Circuits III. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 125. Distributed circuits (transmission 
linos), steady analysis of distributed circuits, simulation of distributed circuits 
li\ equivalent lumped parameter circuits. Interpretation of transmission line 
as general four terminal network (A B C D constants), matrix methods of 
combination of four terminal networks, introduction of "modern" network 
analysis. 3 hr. rec. 

226. Electric and Magnetic Fields II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 126. Plane waves in dielectric 
media; plane waves in conducting media; transmission lines; wave guides; 
antennas. 3 hr. rec. 

232. Electromechanical Devices I. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 125, 126. Fundamentals of elec- 
tromechanical energy conversion. Transformers and rotating machines. 3 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 

233. Electromechanical Devices II. 4 hr. PR: E.E. 232. Analysis of machine- 
performance by the principles of electromechanical energy conversion. 3 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 

235. Electrical Machinery. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 232 or consent. Synchronous machines, 
windings, calculation of emf and mmf; mmf space functions. Potier diagram, 
ASA regulation. 2-reactance diagrams. Multiple-winding transformers and auto 
transformers. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

236. Electrical Machinery. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 233 or consent. Commutation theory of 
machines, d-c and a-c multiple-winding and special purpose machines; mul- 
tiple machine systems. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

251. Electronics II. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 152, 225, 226. Analysis and synthesis of small 
signal R-C coupled and tuned amplifiers, cascade amplifiers, feedback ampli- 
fiers, large signal tuned and untuned amplifiers and oscillators. 2 hr. rec, 3 
hr. lab. 

252. Electronics III. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 251. Analysis of demodulation systems, wave- 
shaping circuits, electronic power-handling systems, photo-sensitive devices 
and microwave devices. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

253. Physical Electronics. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 152. A study of the physical principles of 
electrical conduction and the application of these principles to electronic con- 
duction in solids, electron emission, and conduction in vacuum and gas. 3 hr. 
rec. 

257. Transistor Circuits. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 251 or consent. Application of the basic 
principles of semiconductor electronics to junction and field-effect devices. 
Development of equivalent circuits for junction diodes, transistors, and field- 
effect transistors. 3 hr. rec. 

261. Networks and Filters. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 225 or consent. Analysis and synthesis 
of network and filters. 3 hr. rec. 

264. Communications Engineering. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 251 or consent Communications 
systems, or systems used to transmit information. The underlying principles 
ol modern information transmission systems are stressed. Emphasis is placed 

Upon the fundamental role of system bandwidth and noise in limiting the 
transmission ol information. 3 hr. rec 



'May !)<• taken aa undergraduate work l>> students In othei colleges and schools. 



242 



270. Engineering Analysis and Design. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 232, 251. Formulation and 
application of the method of engineering analysis based upon fundamental 
physical laws, mathematics, and practical engineering considerations. Em- 
phasis is placed on the professional approach to the analysis of engineering 
problems. 3 hr. rec. 

'271. Theory of Digital Computers. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing in Engineering or 
Mathematics. Introduction to the field of digital computer design. Topics in- 
clude general computer organization, number systems and number represen- 
tations, design characteristics of major computer units, Boolean algebra and 
its application to computer design and sequencing of basic arithmetic pro- 
cesses in a computer. 3 hr. rec. 

275. Pulse Techniques. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 225, 152. An introduction to the response of 
electrical networks to non-sinusoidal inputs, the analysis of active networks 
with large signals, and the circuits and techniques used in pulse and digital 
equipment. Students will use University computing facilities by solving prob- 
lems using ECAP. No previous programming is needed. 3 hr. rec. 

280. Electrical Problems. 1-3 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

281. Electrical Power Systems. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 226 or consent. Analysis of balanced 
polyphase systems, including transmission lines. Polyphase transformations. 
Principles of grounding and protection from lightning. 3 hr. rec. 

282. Symmetrical Components. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 226 or consent. Analysis of poly- 
phase systems in unbalanced and transient conditions. 3 hr. rec. 

285. Electric Power Transmission and Distribution. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 226. Circle dia- 
grams applied to the various problems of power transmission; phase modified 
applications and an introduction to power stability. 3 hr. rec. 

286. Fundamentals of Servomechanisms. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 225. Fundamental analysis 
of the servomechanisms and automatic control devices. 3 hr. rec. 

288. Antennas. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 264 or consent. Analysis and design of antenna sys- 
tems. 3 hr. rec. 

'293. Analogue Computers. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140. The theory and operation of ana- 
logue computers. Amplitude scaling and time scaling on the analogue com- 
puter and application of the analogue computer to the solution of differential 
equations. 3 hr. rec. 

299. Ultra-High Frequency Technology. 3 hr. PR: E.E. 264 or consent. Special 
problems encountered at high and ultra-high frequencies. 3 hr. rec. 



GENERAL 

G. 

1. Engineering Lectures. (Credit). Required of all freshmen in engineering. A 
series of lectures designed to acquaint the engineering student at the begin- 
ning of his course with the profession he has chosen. 1 hr. rec. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

I.E. 

Welding and Heat Transfer. 1 hr. Practice in cutting and welding steel and 
cast iron with oxyacetylene and arc welding equipment. Demonstrations of 
different methods of heat treatment. One 3 hr. lab. 



•May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 

ENGINEER1XG 243 



° 1 1 . Machine Work. 2 hr. Equipment, purpose and character of operations, meth- 
ods of holding work, turning, boring, drilling, grinding, and shaping. Use of 
precision measuring instruments. Two 3 hr. labs. 

°15. Welding, Forming, and Heat Treatment. 2 hr. Molding and casting of non- 
ferrous metals, oxyacetylene welding, electric welding, resistance welding of 
plates, pipes, tubing, etc. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory 
practice. 6 hr. lab. 

°100. Manufacturing Processes. 3 hr. Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory work 
relating to methods, types of equipment and character of operations of weld- 
ing machines and machine tools. Emphasis is placed on the economic use of 
machine tools, assembly line manufacture, gauging, and inspection. 2 hr. rec. 
3 hr. lab. 

110. Tool Design. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 100. Design, construction, application, and eco- 
nomic aspects of jigs, fixtures, and special tools used in manufacturing on a 
production basis. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

131. Fundamentals of Industrial Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Sophomore standing. Prin- 
ciples of organization and organization charts and the basic fundamentals of 
Industrial Engineering. Study of the history of labor-management relations, 
review of labor laws, and an examination of collective bargaining of the past 
and present. 

'140. Motion and Time Study. 3 hr. PR: Junior standing. Principles and techniques, 
job analysis, standardization, and formula construction; stop watch and micro- 
motion analysis of industrial operations; development of production and in- 
centive standards. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

142. Production Control. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 140. Planning, scheduling, routing and 
dispatching in manufacturing operations and production control systems. Prob- 
lems in industrial plant design. Layout for operation and control. Space utili- 
zation. 3 hr. rec. 

*151. Accounting for Engineers. 3 hr. PR: Junior standing. The accounting cycle, 
journals, and ledgers; study of fixed assets and depreciation; interpretation of 
financial statements. A survey of the essentials of cost accounting. Emphasis 
is placed on the utilization of cost data and reports by management, indicating 
management's control over industrial operations. 3 hr. rec. 

180. Introduction to Digital Computation. 3 hr. PR: Math. 2 or 3. Introduction to 
stored-program concepts, flow diagrams, looping decisions, input-output tech- 
niques, algebraic compilers, symbolic assembly systems, machine languages, 
subroutines, equipment components, and their applications. The student will 
have considerable opportunity to actually program numerical problems for 
the University's computers. The field of present and future equipment com- 
ponents will be surveyed, and the advantages and disadvantages of various 
techniques and systems will be indicated. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

'200. Metal-Cutting Theory and Practice. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 100 and Mat.E. 250. Metal- 
CUtting tools, tool materials, work materials, cutting fluids, process of chip 
formation, cutting forces, tool-life tests, economics of tool life, measurement 
of product. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

201. Metal Forming Manufacturing Processes. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 100 or consent. Appli- 
cations and operations of the basic metal forming processes including the 
primary metal working processes and the metal shearing, drawing, binding, 
and squeezing processes, along with the machine tools required for these pro- 
cesses. 3 hr. rec. 



be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 



244 



205. Metal Forming Theory. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 201. The mechanics and basics of metal 
forming with elementary theoretical and descriptive investigations of tube- 
sinking, deep-drawing, wire-drawing, extrusion, cold rolling, and forging. 3 hr. 
rec. 

207. Metal Casting Manufacturing Processes. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 100 and Mat.E. 250 
or consent. Fluidity processes used in industry covering non-permanent pro- 
cesses such as sand molding, centrifugal molding, investment molding, and 
shell molding. Some permanent mold methods will be investigated along with 
metal processes, molding machines, and fundamentals of costing design. 3 hr. 
rec. 

211. Industrial Engineering Problems. 1-3 hr. PR: Consent of Department Chair- 
man. Special problems relating to industrial engineering. 

*214. Advanced Analysis of Engineering Data. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 244. The application 
of advanced theories of statistical techniques to analyze and interpret indus- 
trial problems. Subjects include multiple regression, curvilinear regression, 
advanced analysis of variance, randomized complete blocks, Latin Square de- 
signs, factorial designs, transformations, and analysis of response curves. Ac- 
cent is on proper design of experiments, proper interpretation of results, and 
thorough consideration of all errors of estimation and errors of inference. 
3 hr. rec. 

*215. Statistical Decision Making. 3 hr. PR or Cone: I.E. 244 or consent. Basic con- 
cepts of probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, joint and de- 
rived distributions, expectation, and properties of estimators. Special emphasis 
is placed on the applications of probability theory in operations research, 
quality control, and human factors engineering. 3 hr. rec. 

229. Design of Dynamic Material Systems. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 140, I.E. 142 or consent. 
The application of industrial engineering theory and practice to the selection 
of material systems and equipment. This is to include the efficient handling 
of materials from the first movement of raw materials to the final movement 
of the finished product. Present quantitative design techniques will be in- 
cluded. 3 hr. rec. 

*244. Engineering Statistics. 3 hr. PR or cone: Math. 17. The use of graphical 
analysis; measures of central tendency and dispersion; normal, binomial, and 
Poisson distributions in engineering applications; linear regression and cor- 
relation; tests of significance, nonparametric statistics, and analysis of vari- 
ance. Includes applications of statistical sampling techniques in quality con- 
trol. 3 hr. rec. 

*250. Electronic Computer Data Processing. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing. Funda- 
mentals of digital computer operations, equipment characteristics, input and 
output components. Elements of number systems. Fundamentals of "IR," in- 
formation retrieval. Emphasis is placed on integrated systems analysis and 
design, business and industrial data for computer applications, and funda- 
mentals of programming. Existing equipment systems and the economics of 
their applications will be reviewed. 

253. Analytical Techniques of Operations Research. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 244. A study of 
the analytical techniques used in operations research and industrial engineer- 
ing with special emphasis on their application to industrial systems and opera- 
tions. The applications of matrix algebra, vectors and convex set theory to 
linear programming. Minimization techniques including differencing, differ- 
entiation of single and multiple integrals and Langrangian multipliers with 
application to production and inventory problems. Markov Processes with 
applications to production problems and decision making. 3 hr. rec. 



'May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 

ENG1NEERIXC 245 



'254. Introduction to Operations Research. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 244, and cone: I.E. 142 
or consent. Economic problems of production management, schematic models, 
linear programming, total value analysis, incremental analysis, Monte Carlo 
analysis, inventory theory, queueing theory, and game theory. 3 hr. rec. 

256. Introduction to Systems Engineering. 1 hr. PR: I.E. 214, cone: I.E. 254, I.E. 
287. The nature of scientific methodology including: quantitative synthesis 
of models with accompanying objectives and restrictions, definition of terms, 
sampling and measurement of components of the model, development and 
testing of assumptions, optimization techniques, testing and controlling the 
model and the solution, and error sensitivity of the model. Emphasis will also 
be toward development of the problem-solver's ability to successfully assign 
resources to the problem solution phases in a manner such as to equalize the 
marginal cost of improving the model's reliability. This course will provide an 
opportunity for the student to analyze an operation as it may interact with 
the whole system. 1 hr. rec. 

'281. Digital Computation for Engineers. 3 hr. Cone: Math. 15. Study of processes 
of broadly integrating the digital computer into service for the engineer or 
scientist and study of the programming process with emphasis on coding with 
the automatic programming language Fortran. Considerable use will be made 
of University Computer Center equipment, especially the IBM 360 Model 75. 
Various other programming languages such as COBOL and ALGOL will be 
reviewed. Considerable time will also be devoted to topics such as real-time 
control, principles of computer functions, study of available equipment, broad 
use categories of equipment, etc. 2 hr. rec. 3 hr. lab. 

282. Advanced Digital Computer Concepts. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 180 or 281 or consent. 
Principles of digital computer functional components. Study of digital operat- 
ing systems including structure of the various subsystem components such as 
monitors, input output control systems, and loaders. Advanced operating sys- 
tem concepts including multiprogramming, multiprocessing, teleprocessing, 
and time sharing will be covered. Various existing operating systems will be 
evaluated as well as principles in overall system design. 3 hr. rec. 

283. Informational Retrieval. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 180 or 281 or consent. Study of the 
tools, elements and theories of information storage and retrieval. Areas of 
study include documentation, information framework; indexing; elements of 
usage, organization and equipment; parameters and implementation; theories 
of file organization and system design. 3 hr. rec. 

284. Simulation by Digital Methods. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 244 or consent and Fortran 
programming experience. An introduction to methods of simulation using the 
digital computer. Study of the methods of generating random numbers, the 
Monte Carlo technique, process generators, industrial dynamics models, meth- 
ods of error analysis and reduction, and digital computer simulation languages 
such as Simscript, Dynamo, Fordyn, and especially GPSS (General Purpose 
System Simulator-Ill). The student will be provided the opportunity to use the 
digital computer to simulate moderately complex production, inventory, 
queueing, and maintenance systems. Although the primary emphasis is more 
practically restricted to models of industrial operations, the techniques are 
immediately adaptable to simulation of any physical or information system. 
Simulated experiments are also considered. 3 hr. rec. 

'287. Engineering Economy. 3 hr. PR: Junior standing. Comparison of the relative 
economy of engineering alternatives; compound interest in relation to calcu- 
lation of annual costs; present worth and prospective rates of return on in- 
vestments; methods of depreciation; sunk costs, increment costs; general econ- 
omy studies with emphasis on retirement and replacement of equipment; con- 
sideration of taxes, public works, and manufacturing costs as related to eco- 
nomic solution of engineering proposals. 3 hr. rec. 



•May tic taken as undergraduate work l>\ students in othei colleges and schools. 



246 



'288. Job Evaluation and Wage Incentives. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 140 or consent. Principles 
used in evaluating jobs, rates of pay, characteristics and objectives of wage 
incentive plans; incentive formulae and curves. 3 hr. rec. 

'290. Industrial Statistics. 2 hr. PR: I.E. 244. Economic objectives of quality con- 
trol in manufacturing through sampling methods; the Shewhart control chart 
for variables, attributes, and defects per unit; statistical approach to accept- 
ance procedures. 2 hr. rec. 

292. Plant Layout and Design. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 142. Problems in industrial plant de- 
sign. Equipment location, space utilization, layout for operation and control, 
flow sheets, materials handling. Allied topics in power utilization, light, heat, 
and ventilation. 1 hr. rec, 6 hr. lab. 

'294. Standard Manufacturing Costs. 3 hr. PR: I.E. 151. Development of standards 
for labor, material, and overhead expenses; uses of standards for control; 
analyses of variances between standard and actual costs. 3 hr. rec. 

299. Human Factors Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Psychol. 115 or consent. An exami- 
nation of human factors engineering and man-machine systems to include a 
study of ambient environment, human capabilities and equipment design. Ap- 
plication of human factors engineering in workplace design, maintainability, 
and task design methodology. Study of system design for man-computer inter- 
face, life support requirements, simulators and man-machine systems. 2 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
M.E. 

20. Engineering Graphics. 3 hr. Lettering, use of instruments, geometric con- 
struction, orthographic projection, section and conventions, auxiliary views, 
descriptive, pictorial sketching, dimensioning. 2 hr. rec, 4 hr. lab. 

109. Kinematics of Mechanisms. 3 hr. PR or cone: Math. 140. Kinematic analysis 
and synthesis of linkages, gears, cams, and other basic mechanisms. 2 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. 

112. Dynamics of Machines. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 109 and T.A.M. 104. Static and dy- 
namic force analysis in mechanical systems. Principles of vibration theory and 
balancing of rotating machinery. Rigid body motion and gyroscopes. 3 hr. rec. 

120. Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hr. PR: Physics 102 and Math. 17. First and 
second laws of thermodynamics; energy equations; properties of gases and 
vapors; gaseous mixtures and combustion. 3 hr. rec 

121. Thermodynamics of Engineering. 3 hr. PR: Physics 102 and Math. 17. Prin- 
ciples of thermodynamics; properties of gases and vapors; vapor cycles; in- 
ternal combustion engines cycles; refrigeration; and heat transfer. Not open 
to students majoring in mechanical engineering. 3 hr. rec. 

125. Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 120, Math. 140 (or consent). 
Continuation of M.E. 120; gas and vapor cycles, mixtures of gases and vapors, 
chemical reactions; introduction to fluid mechanics. 3 hr. rec. 

130. Mechanical Engineering Analysis. 3 hr. PR or cone: Math. 140. Numerical 
and graphical techniques applied to the solution of mechanical engineering 
problems. Analog and digital computer programming. Data analysis. 2 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 

135. Mechanical Engineering Measurements. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 120, T.A.M. 102, 
T.A.M. 104. Static and dynamic measurements of pressure, temperature, force, 
stress, displacement, etc. Calibration of instruments and error analysis. 2 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 

'May be taken as undergraduate work by students in other colleges and schools. 

ENGINEERING 217 



200. Engineering Systems Laboratory. 2 In. PR: M.E. 135; Co-requisites: M.E. 
201, M.E. '230. M.E. 221. The experimental evaluation of modern and com- 
plex engineering systems. Participation in groups with oral and written pre- 
sentation of results. 6 hr. lab. 

201. Mechanical Engineering Design. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 112, T.A.M. 102. Funda- 
mentals of mechanical design. Analysis of stress, deformation and failure 
modes. Rational design and selection of mechanical elements. Theory of lubri- 
cation and wear. Problem formulation and optimization of solutions. 3 hr. rec. 

202. Engineering Systems Design. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 200, M.E. 201. Identification and 
solution of challenging engineering problems through rational analysis and 
creative synthesis. Planning, designing, and reporting on complex systems on 
individual and group basis. 6 hr. lab. 

204. Mechanical Vibrations. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140 and M.E. 112 or consent. Funda- 
mentals of vibration theory. Free and forced vibration of single and multiple 
degree of freedom systems. Solution by Fourier and Laplace transformation 
techniques. Transient analysis emphasized. Energy methods. 3 hr. rec. 

205. Kinematics. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 112 and Math. 140 or consent. Geometry of con- 
strained motion, kinematics synthesis and design, special linkages. Coupled 
curves, inflection circle, Euler-Savary equation, cubic of stationary curvature 
and finite displacement techniques. 3 hr. rec. 

221. Thermodynamics of Fluids. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 125. The dynamics and thermo- 
dynamics of fluids. Integral formulation of basic laws for closed and open 
systems and control volumes. Effects of heat conduction, viscosity, and com- 
pressibility on free and boundary flows. 3 hr. rec. 

225. Problems in Thermodynamics. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 125 or consent. Detailed study 
of thermodynamic systems with special emphasis on actual processes. The 
problems presented are designed to strengthen the background of the student 
in the application of the fundamental thermodynamic concepts. 2 hr. rec, 
3 hr. lab. 

229. Internal Combustion Engines. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 121 or M.E. 125. The thermo- 
dynamics of the internal combustion engine; Otto cycle; Diesel cycle; two- 
and four-cycle engines, fuels, carburetion and fuel injection; combustion; 
engine performance, supercharging. 3 hr. rec. 

230. Heat Transfer I. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 120 or M.E. 121. Steady state and transient 
conduction, including extended surface and numerical methods, emphasizing 
both forward and backward time step methods. Thermal radiation including 
radiation functions and radiation network theory. Boundary layer equations 
and forced and free convection are also covered. 3 hr. rec. 

231. Introduction to Gas Dynamics. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 221 or consent. Basic funda- 
mentals of gas dynamics, one-dimensional gas dynamics and wave motion, 
methods of measurement, effect of viscosity and conductivity, and concepts 
from gas kinetics. 3 hr. rec. 

235. Heat Transfer II. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 230. A continuation of M.E. 230, covering 
nonlinear extended surface; gas radiation: freezing, heat exchanger theory; 
recovery factor and high speed How; and mass transfer. Also, periodic flow 
and application of the digital computei to problems in heat transfer. 3 hr. rec. 

250. Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning. 3 hr. PR: M.E. 125 or consent. 
Methods and systems of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning of various 
types of buildings, types of controls and their application. 3 hr. rec. 

260. Introductory Engineering Systems Analysis. 3 hr. PR: Senior standing. A 
Study of analogues and mixed systems. Similitude of mechanical, electrical, 

and acoustic dynamic systems. Dimensional analysis and theory of model de- 
sign. 3 lir. n ( . 

248 



265. Engineering Acoustics. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140 and consent. Use of fundamental 
principles of mathematics and physics to develop the basic theories of sound. 
Application of these theories involving sound in closed areas, the various 
modes of sound transmission, noise control, and psychoacoustic criteria. 3 hr. 
rec. 

271. Introduction to Feedback Control Theory. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140 and E.E. 105 
or equivalent background. Introduction to automatic control systems and con- 
cepts of feedback. Transfer function analysis of the equations of motion. 
Transient and steady state response. Stability criteria using Nyquist, root locus 
and frequency response techniques. 3 hr. rec. 

280. Mechanical Problems. 1-6 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

290. Seminar. 1-6 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

291. Seminar. 1-6 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

294. Special Topics. 1-6 hr. For junior, senior, and graduate students. 

295. Special Topics. 1-6 hr. For junior, senior and graduate students. 



THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS 
T.A.M. 

101. Statics. 3 hr. PR: Math. 17, Physics 11 (or reg. in Math. 17). Fundamental 
definitions and the concept of static equilibrium; systems of forces and 
couples; application to solution of trusses and frames; centroids and moments 
of inertia. Programmed instruction will be utilized in certain sections of this 
course. 3 hr. rec. 

102. Mechanics of Materials I. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 101 and Math. 17. Stress, strain, 
stress-strain relationships; Mohr stress and strain-circles; load-stress and load- 
deformation relationships for axial, torsion, bending, and buckling loads; in- 
elastic theory is considered; deflections; column theory. 3 hr. rec. 

103. Mechanics of Materials H. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 102 and Math. 17. Theories of 
failure and design procedures; survey of experimental stress analysis; fatigue, 
energy, creep, relaxation, and temperature considerations. Laboratory work in 
behavior of common engineering materials under load; evaluation and inter- 
pretation of mechanical properties. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

104. Dynamics. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 101 and Math. 17. Fundamentals of Newtonian 
mechanics; kinematics of particles and plane rigid bodies; principles of work- 
energy and impulse-momentum applied to particles, and rigid bodies in trans- 
lation, rotation, and general plane motion; application to engineering prob- 
lems. Programmed instruction will be utilized in certain sections of this course. 
3 hr. rec. 

200. Advanced Mechanics of Materials I. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 103 or consent. Energy 
methods; localized stresses; nonsymmetrical bending; curved flexural mem- 
bers; thick-walled cylinders and rotating disks; beams on elastic supports. 

201. Theory and Application of Oscillatory Phenomena. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 104. 
Study of oscillations or vibrations in acoustical, electrical, hydraulic and me- 
chanical systems. 3 hr. rec. 

202. Advanced Laboratory. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Applied engineering measurements 
and instrumentation dealing with mechanical phenomena as force, displace- 
ment, pressure, torque, velocity, and acceleration. Introduces students to vari- 
ous transducer, signal conditioning, and readout equipment. Time allowed for 
term project of specific student interest. 

ENGINEERING 249 



203. Experimental Stress Analysis. 3 hr. PR: 1 A.M. 103. 104. Introduction to some 
of the more common experimental methods of analyzing stress distributions. 
Photoelasticity, brittle lacquers, birefringent coatings, strain gage techniques 
and instrumentation, as applied to problems involving static, dynamic and 
residual stress distributions. 2 hr. ree., 3 hr. lab. 

250. Intermediate Dynamics. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 104. Math. 140, and consent. De- 
tailed development of the vectorial mechanics of particles and systems of 
particles in general three-dimensional motion, including extensive use of ro- 
tating reference frames. Extension of the concepts of virtual work and dis- 
placements to the derivation of Lagrange's Equations for holonomic and non- 
holonomic systems. Application of above principles to orbital motion. 3 hr. rec. 

280. Special Problems in Mechanics. 1-3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 103 and consent. For 
junior, senior, and graduate students. 



COURSES IN SCHOOL OF MINES 

ENGINEERING OF MINES 

E.M. 

1. Freshman Orientation. I (Credit). Required of all freshmen in mining and 
petroleum engineering. A series of lectures designed to acquaint the student 
at the beginning of his course with the characteristics and requirements of the 
engineering profession, with particular attention to the mineral engineering 
fields. 1 hr. lee. 

102. Mine Surveying. SI. 5 hr. PR: Math. 15. Principles of surface and subsurface 
surveying, celestial observations, and related calculations together with in- 
tensive field practice in underground and surface surveying. Rec. and field 
work arranged. 

106. Mineralogy. I. 2 hr. PR: Chem. 16. Mineral identification, blowpipe analysis 
of minerals; occurrence, geographic distribution and utilization of minerals; 
elements of crystallography. Two 3 hr. labs. 

108. Fundamentals of Mining. I. 4 hr. PR: Geol. 1, Math. 17, Physics 102, E.M. 
102, or consent. Mineral prospecting, drilling, use of explosives, mining 
methods for bedded deposits and ore bodies, timbering and application of 
mining machinery. 4 hr. rec. 

112. Mine Plant Design. II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 212, T.A.M. 102, C.E. 115 and Mat.E. 
250 or concurrent enrollment. Applications of the principle of mechanics and 
mining technology to the analysis and design of mine building, head-frames, 
bins, skips and cages. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

200. Elements of Mineral Conservation. I. 3 hr. PR: Open to any student in the 
University with Junior standing. A stud) of the future demands for mineral 
resources including coal, water, oil, gas, ores, and industrial minerals and the 
causes oi mineral loss in production and utilization and how to avoid or 

minimize them. 

201. Fire Control Engineering. II. 3 or 4 hr. PR: Senioi standing in an engineering 
curriculum or consent. The aspects involved in the control from fire, explosion 
and other related hazards. Protective considerations in building design and 
construction. Fire and < xplosive protection organization including fire detec- 
tion and control. Lectures 3 and /or lab. 1 hr. 

207. Introductory Seismology. I. 1 hr. PR: Physics 11. Earthquakes and the causes 
and area distribution; theor) of elastic waves; the principles of seismograph 

250 



construction, adjustment, and operation; interpretation and calculation of seis- 
mographs with exercises provided by records of the University seismograph 
station. 1 hr. rec. 

209. Mineral Preparation. II. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 104, or consent. Principles of prepa- 
ration, beneficiation and concentration of metallic and non-metallic ores for 
further processing or utilization. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

212. Advanced Mining. II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 108 and PR or cone: E.E. 105. Engi- 
neering principles, methods and equipment applied to mine transportation, 
hoisting, and drainage. 3 hr. rec. 

213. Mine Ventilation. I. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 108, T.A.M. 104 and C.E. 115. Principles, 
purposes, methods and equipment pertaining to the ventilation of mines. 2 
hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

215. Industrial Safety Engineering. I. 2 hr. PR: Junior standing or consent. Analysis 
of problems of industrial safety and accident prevention, laws pertaining to 
industrial safety and health, compensation plans and laws, and industrial prop- 
erty protection. 2 hr. rec. 

217. Coal Preparation. I. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 212, C.E. 115, and E.M. 209. Formation 
of coal, rank, classification of coal, coal petrography, principles of preparing 
and beneficiating coal for market with laboratory devoted to sampling, screen 
analysis, float and sink separation and use of various types of coal cleaning 
equipment. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

218. Advanced Mineral Preparation. II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 108 and E.M. 209. The 
theory and practice of concentration ores and industrial minerals with special 
consideration to the more recent advances in the beneficiation of both ores 
and coal. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

219. Advanced Mining Methods for Vein Deposits. II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 108, T.A.M. 
104. Methods and systems of mining other than flat seams. Emphasis placed 
on selection of methods in relation to cohesive strength of ore bodies and 
their enclosing wall rocks. Mining of anthracite seam included. 3 hr. rec. 

220. Mine Design. I, II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 212 and E.M. 241. A comprehensive de- 
sign problem involving underground mining developments or design of surface 
plant or both, as elected by the student in consultation with the instructor. A 
complete report on the problem is required including drawings, specifications 
and cost analysis. 9 hr. lab. 

222. Mine Equipment and Machinery. II. 3 hr. PR or Cone: E.E. 205 and E.M. 

212. Selection, installation, operation, and maintenance of mining equipment. 
3 hr. rec 

223. Mine Management. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140, E.M. 212 and senior standing. 
Economic, governmental, social, and labor aspects of mining as related to the 
management of a mining enterprise. 3 hr. rec. 

224. Mining Engineering Problems. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Senior or graduate standing. 
Investigation and detailed report on a special problem in mining engineering 
related to coal mining or mineral mining. Supervision and guidance by a 
member of the graduate faculty. 

228. Mine Equipment and Machinery Controls. I. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 222 or consent. 
Principles, application and use of electric and hydraulic devices and circuits 
lor protection and control of mine machinery and equipment. 3 hr. rec 

229. Advanced Mining Equipment Applications. II. 3 hr. PR: E.M. 228. Structural, 
mechanical, hydraulic and electrical characteristics of the more common items 
of mining equipment. Controls, electrical and hydraulic circuits, and mechani- 
cal transmissions with associated problems. Laboratory design of a control 
system for a mining machine. 2 hr. rec. 3 hr. lab. 

MINES 251 



230. Elements of Geophysical Prospecting. I. 3 or 4 hr. PR: Geol. 1, Physics 11. 
Principles, calculations and application of methods for locating subsurface oil, 
gas, and mineral deposits. Field investigations using instruments with 4 hr. 
section. 

234. Applied Geophysics. II. 3 hr. PR: Physics 102 and Geol. 151 or consent. Ori- 
gin of the universe and the planets, heat and age of the earth. Application of 
the science of geophysics in the location and analysis of earthquakes and in 
prospecting for oil and minerals. 

241. Mechanics of Ground Control in Mines. I. 3 hr. PR: T.A.M. 102, Math. 140. 
I'M. 108 or consent. Structure of the earth's crust, bedding planes, joints, 
heterogeneity, mechanical properties of rocks, stress-time-deformation relation- 
ships in rocks, theoretical stress distribution about mine openings, practical 
effects, factors in mine pillar design, pillar bursts, creeps and squeezes, mining 
subsidence. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 



PETROLEUM ENGINEERING 
Pet.E. 

106. Principles Applying to Oil and Gas Field Development and Production. I. 4 

hr. PR: Math. 17, C.E. 115. and Geol. 1. Drilling, fluid hydraulics, air and 
gas drilling, casing design, cementing program, flowing well performance, 
artificial lift design, pumping well design and an introduction to hydraulic 
fracturing and aridizing. 3 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

206. Natural Gas Engineering. I. 3 hr. PR: Pet.E. 106, C.E. 115. Principles of 
natural gas production, transmission, distribution, processing, regulation, 
measurement, storage and analysis with a laboratory devoted to the principles 
of the equipment utilized in the above named operations. 2 hr. rec, 3 hr. lab. 

216. Petroleum Engineering Design. II. 3 hr. PR: Pet.E. 232, Material Engr. 250. 
A comprehensive problem in design involving systems in oil and gas produc- 
tion, field processing, transportation and storage. Three 3-hr. labs. 

224. Petroleum Engineering Problems. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Senior or graduate stand- 
ing. Investigation and detailed report on a special problem in petroleum or 
natural gas engineering. 

232. Petroleum Reservoir Engineering. I. 5 or 6 hr. PR: Pet.E. 236. Concepts oi 
properties of rocks and rock-fluids systems which are fundamental to engineer- 
ing analysis of petroleum reservoirs, mechanics of fluid flow in porous media, 
production by depletion drive, by water drive, and by segregation drive. 5 hr. 
rec, 1 hr. lab. with 6 hr. credit. 

235. Fundamentals of Well Logging. II. 3 hr. PR: Math. 140, Pet.lv 106. or eon- 
sent. Principles of the various well logging methods and related calculations 
with exercises in interpretation of data from actual well logs. 2 hr. ree., 3 hr. 
lab. 

236. Mechanics of Hydrocarbon Fluids. I. 3 hr. PR: Physics 102, C.E. 115, Pet.E. 
106, Chem. 141. The qualitative and quantitative phase behavior of single 
and multieomponent hydrocarbon systems with emphasis on application to 
petroleum production engineering and petroleum reservoir engineering. 2 hr. 
rec, 3 hr. lab. 

237. Composition and Properties of Oil Well Drillings Fluids. II. 2 hr. PR: Pet.E. 
106, Chem, 141, and C.E. 115. Principles of drilling fluid control including a 
laboratory for pilot testing, mud design procedures and measurement of com- 
position and properties. 1 hr. ree., 3 hr. lab. 

240. Secondary Recovery of Oil by Water Flooding. I. 3 hr. PR: Pet.E. 232 or 
consent Theory of immiscible fluid displacement mechanism, evaluation, and 
economics of water Hood projects and oil field flooding techniques. 3 hr. rec 

252 



241. Petroleum Management Engineering. II. 4 hr. PR: Pet.E. 106, 232, 235; Econ. 
51. Petroleum property evaluation, factors influencing oil economics, values of 
money and taxation of oil properties. Calculation of reserves and future reser- 
voir performance, decline curves, production and formation testing and social 
aspects of management of oil and gas properties. 4 hr. rec. 

242. Well Stimulation: Fracturing. I. 3 hr. PR: Pet.E. 106, Pet.E. 241. Theory of 
hydraulic fracturing, fracturing tools, fracturing fluids, fracturing orientation: 
propping agents and general design treatment for optimum profitability. 3 hr. 
rec. 

243. Advanced Secondary Recovery. II. 3 hr. PR: Pet.E. 240. Theory and practice 
of secondary recovery of oil by gas flooding, miscible fluid injection, in situ 
combustion, and heat injection. 3 hr. rec. 



MIXES 253 



The College of Human Resources and Education 



The College of Human Resources and Education was created in 1965, and in- 
cludes the Divisions of Clinical Studies, Education, Family Resources, Social Work, 
and the Human Resources Research Institute. 

It brings together the several University disciplines and professions devoted 
to the study and maximum development of human talent and resources, whether in 
the context of the school, the family, or the community. 



FACULTY 

Stanley O. Ikenberry, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Human Resources and Edu- 
cation; Associate Professor of Education. 
Marvin R. Lee, M.A., Assistant to Dean; Instructor in Education. 

Division of Clinical Studies 

Oscar G. Mink, Ed.D., Director of Clinical Studies; Associate Professor of Clinical 

Studies. 
Constantinos E. Alexakos, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
Robert J. Babcock, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Thomas L. Blaskovics, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Duane Brown, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
James S. Delo, M.A., Assistant Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
Norma P. Ellifritz, M.A., Instructor (part-time) in Special Education. 
Jonell H. Folds, Ed.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
Cynthia R. Frola, M.A., Instructor in Reading. 

Judith R. Gaviser, M.S., Instructor in Speech Pathology and Audiology. 
Michael S. Goldman, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Betty A. Gum Guill, M.S., Instructor in Guidance. 
Thomas C. Hatcher, M.A., Instructor in Reading. 
Janet O. Hutchinson, M.S., Instructor in Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Barbara E. James, Ph.D., Visiting Associate Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
Marion E. Jarrett, M.S., Instructor in Speech Pathology and Audiology. 
Eddie C. Kennedy, Ed.D., Professor of Reading. 
JoAnn Layne, M.S., Instructor in Speech Pathology and Audiology. 
Glen P. McCormick, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Speech Pathology and Audiology. 
Allied P. McDonald, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Robert L. Masson, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Joseph Moriarty, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Counseling. 
Sarah A. Mosko, M.S., Instructor in Sjxceh Pathology and Audiology. 
Roberl II. Neff, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Special Education. 
Frank J. Nuzum, M.S., Instructor in Counseling and Guidance. 
Wilbl it E. Rankin, M.S.. Assistant Professor of Speech Pathology and Audiology. 
Charles E. Smith, I'li.l).. Associate Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 
Tennie S. Smith, M.A., Instructor in Counseling and Guidance. 
David J. SrebaltlS, M.A.. Assistant Professor of Counseling and Guidance. 

254 



Division of Education 

William K. Katz, Ed.D., Director of Education; Professor of Education. 

Howard B. Allen, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Benjamin H. Bailey, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Sheldon Baker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Robert D. Baldwin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Laddie R. Bell, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education; Coordinator of Graduate 
Cooperative Programs. 

Allen Blumberg, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Earl R. Boggs, Pe.D., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Jack H. Bond, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Thomas J. Brennan, Ed.D., Professor of Education; Coordinator of Industrial Educa- 
tion. 

Robert B. Brumbaugh, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Russell C. Butler, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

John L. Carline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Michael A. Caruso, M.A., Instructor in Education; Adviser for Extension Students. 

Wincie Ann Carruth, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

George H. Colebank, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Glennis H. Cunningham, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Paul W. DeVore, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Evelyn DiTosto, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Mildred E. Fizer, M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Richard C. Franklin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Wilson I. Gautier, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Mary Jane W. Glasscock, M.M., Instructor in Education. 

Harold I. Goodwin, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Virginia R. Griffin, M.S., Assistant Professor of Education. 

James G. Harlow, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Harry B. Heflin, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Arthur N. Hofstetter, Ed.D., Professor of Education. 

Frederick J. Holter, Ph.D., Professor of Education 

Boyd D. Holton, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Leo Horacek, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Earl Hudelson, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Stanley O. Ikenberry, Ph.D., Dean of the College of Human Resources and Edu- 
cation; Associate Professor of Education. 
Claude Kelley, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Warren G. Kelly, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 
Marvin R. Lee, M.A., Instructor in Education; Assistant to Dean. 
Rogers McAvoy, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 
Thelma B. McDowell, M.A., Instructor in Education. 
O. Claude McGhee, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Mary D. Marockie, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 
Delmas F. Miller, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 
Kenneth C. Murray, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

E. Grant Nine, M.A., Assistant Professor of Education; Principal, University High 
School. 

Ruth D. Noer, M.S., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Richard L. Ober, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

HUMAN RESOURCES AND EDUCATION 255 



Franklin Parker, Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Dickson W. Parsons, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

John J. Paterson, Ed.D., Associate 1 Professor of Education. 

David A. Puzzuoli, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

John Semon, M.S., Associate Professor of Education. 

Gerard O. Solomon, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Robert H. Stauffer, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Forest W. Stemple, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 

Michael Tseng, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education. 

Julie S. Vargas, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Roman J. Verhaalen, Ph.D., Dean of Kanawha Valley Graduate Center; Professor of 

Education. 
Richard T. Walls, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 
Harry G. Wheat, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Education. 
Samuel E. Wood, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 
Mary L. Yeazell, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education. 
C. Peter Yost, Dean of School of Physical Education; Professor of Education. 

Division of Family Resources 

William H. Marshall, Ed.D., Director of Family Resources; Professor of Child De- 
velopment. 

Gladys R. Ayersman, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

April V. Beavers, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Betty I. Berthy, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Martha K. Clark, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Babette Graf, M.S., Associate Professor of Home Economics. 

Frank H. Hooper, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Child Development. 

Ruth Pierce Hughes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Home Economics Education. 

Mary R. Jones, M.S., Associate Professor (part-time) of Home Economics. 

Ruth K. Jones, M.S., State Extension Clothing Specialist; Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics. 

Janice I. Mayfield,M.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Betty L. Ramsey, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economics. 

Sylvia C. Shapiro, M.Ed., State Extension Program Leader— Home Demonstration; 
Instructor in Home Economics. 

John A. Shultz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Family Relations; State Extension 
Specialist— Child Development and Human Relations. 

Carl B. Taylor, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Family Life. 

Jacqueline K. YanRiper, M.S., Instructor in Home Economies. 

Ruth E. Weibel, M.S., Assistant Professor of Home Economies. 

Clara M. Wendt, M.S., Assistant Professor; Stat< Extension Specialist— Consumer and 
Food Economics. 

Margaret A. Wilson. Ph.D., Professor of Home Economics. 

Division of Social Work 
Leon II. Ginsberg, Ph.D., Director and Professor of Social Work. 

Janet \<\> s M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

Roman B. Aquizap, M.A., Visiting Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
Betty L. Baer, M.S.S., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

\im;i E. Blackwell, A M Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

256 



Marjorie H. Buckholz, Ph.D., Professor of Social Work. 

Stanley H. Blostein, M.S. SAW, Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

Charlotte X. Diehl, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

C. Courtney Elliott, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

Helen S. Ellison, M.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work. 

Harvey L. Gochros, D.S.W., Professor of Social Work and Director of Branch 

Programs. 
John Isaacson, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
Patricia M. Keith, A.M., Instructor (part-time) in Social Work. 
Caroline T. Mudd, M.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work. 
Virginia B. Myers. M.S.W., Instructor in Social Work. 
Rodney Pelton, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
Robert B. Porter, M.S.S.W., Associate Professor of Social Work. 
Ralph M. Rogers, M.S.W., Instructor in Social Work. 
Leroy G. Shultz, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
Josephine Harris Stewart, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
David P. Williams, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 
Earl Yaillen, M.S.W., Assistant Professor of Social Work. 

University High School 

E. Grant Nine, M.S., Principal. 

Anna Brochick, M.A., Instructor, English. 

Sara E. Brock, M.S., Instructor, Physical Education. 

Allan R. Bryant, M.S., Instructor, Vocational Agricidture. 

Janet D. Callahan, M.S., Instructor, Vocational Agriculture. 

George H. Colebank, M.A., Assistant Professor and Principal (retired). 

Ruth E. Cook, M.S.H.E., Instructor, Vocational Home Economics. 

Gloria J. Cunningham, M.S., Instructor, Commerce. 

Catherine M. Dorsey, M.A., Assistant Professor, Mathematics. 

Dorothy C. Engle, M.A., Instructor, English. 

Homer M. Fizer, M.S., Instructor, Physical Education. 

Maurice J. Hamrick, M.S., Teacher (part-time) Music. 

Daniel F. Harris, M.A., Teacher, Art. 

William P. Hawley, B.S., Teacher, Biological Science. 

Sara E. Logan, M.A., Instructor, Mathematics. 

David H. R. Loughrie, LL.B., Instructor, Social Studies and Integrated Studies. 

Virginia R. MacKenzie, M.A., Instructor, English. 

Roger L. Michael, M.A., Teacher (part-time), Music. 

Margoline J. Mills, B.S., Teacher, Commerce. 

Lillie D. Morgan, A.M., Instructor, English. 

Joanne V. Xitz, M.A., Teacher, Social Studies. 

James S. O'Hara, M.A., Instructor, Industrial Arts. 

JoAnne Pasini, M.A., Instructor, Social Studies. 

Kathleen J. Porter, B.S., Teacher, Commerce. 

Oleta R. Post, M.A., Instructor, English. 

Louise B. Roberts, M.A., Instructor, Vocational Home Economics {retired). 

JoAnn Robinson, B.S., Teacher. Commera . 

Kate M. Roller, M.A., Instructor, Art (retired). 

Richard X. Ryan, M.A.. Instructor. Social Studies. 

Ruth D. Solomon, M.A.. Teacher, Biological and Physical Science. 

HUMAN RESOURCES AND EDUCATION 25] 



Alice V. Semon, M.A., Instructor, Social Studies. 

Laura D. Tabbara. M.A.. Instructor, Social Studies. 

Joseph P. Talerico, M.A., Instructor, Social Studies and Visual Aids. 

May L. Wilt, M.A., Instructor. Mathematics (retired). 

Yvonne M. Woofter, M.A., Instructor, English (retired). 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Omicron Nu ( Home Economics Honorary ) 

Kappa Delta Pi (National honorary and professional education society) 

Phi Upsilon Omicron (Professional organization for home economics) 

Sigma Alpha Eta (Speech pathology and audiology honorary) 

Phi Delta Kappa (Graduate education men) 

Student National Education Association 

W.V.U. Student Chapter, American Home Economics Association 

Association for Childhood Education International 

Social Work Student Organization 



THE DIVISION OF CLINICAL STUDIES 



The West Virginia University training program in Speech Pathology-Audiology is 
the state's largest program specializing in the preparation of speech and hearing 
specialists with Baccalaureate degrees. A high percentage of students completing the 
undergraduate program in speech and hearing pursue immediately advanced training 
in speech pathology or audiology, either at West Virginia University, or, in other 
comparable programs. 

SPA, as the program is designated, offers all students practical experience in: 
( 1 ) Monongalia County public schools, ( 2 ) A community type speech and hearing 
clinic on the University's downtown campus, and (3) The comprehensive Medical 
Center Speech and Hearing Clinic. Such experience qualifies SPA graduates for em- 
ployment in public schools, special treatment facilities, and/or medically oriented 
centers. 

SPA is administratively within the Division of Clinical Studies, College of 
Human Resources and Education. As a result, SPA students elect courses in Counsel- 
ing and Guidance, Reading, Rehabilitation Counseling, Special Education, etc. The 
general curriculum also offers the graduating student formal credentials for public 
school speech and hearing employment. Since SPA is NCATK° approved, the "Special 
Teachers" credential is reciprocal to all stales recognizing NCATE jurisdiction. 

Employment opportunities for speech and hearing specialists are extremely 
favorable, as are opportunities for support in graduate- study. SPA currently offers 
deserving undergraduates support for graduate study via University assistantships and 
the following federal traineesliips: Rehabilitation Services Administration, United 
States Office <>f Education, and Veterans Administration traineesliips. SPA, because of 
its affiliation with the American Speech and Hearing Association, encourages all its 
baccalaureate students to continue graduate study in Speech Pathology or Clinical 
Audiology. Because of the nature of speech pathology-audiology, a richly rewarding 
career is at the disposal ot West Virginia University students majoring in Speech 
Pathology-Audiology. 

'National accrediting agencj (<>i teacher education. 

258 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

(B.S. in Speech Pathology and Audiology) 

1. Fulfill the core curriculum requirements prescribed for lower division stu- 
dents. 

2. Present, as a year of laboratory science, either biology or zoology. 

3. Include, as electives during the freshman and sophomore years, the fol- 
lowing courses: 

General Psychology 
Voice and Diction (Speech) 
Public Speaking (Speech) 
SPA 50 

4. Lower division grade point average must be not less than 2.25, including a 
C or better in SPA 50. 

5. For continuation toward a degree, the student must maintain a 2.5 or better 
average in the subjects in his major field and exhibit the personal and professional 
qualities predictive of successful performance in the profession. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 

Undergraduate students may major in Speech Pathology and Audiology. Dur- 
ing the first two years, their academic program consists of fulfilling the requirements 
of the Core Curriculum. They are expected to take biology or zoology as the labora- 
tory science and, as time permits, elect courses in psychology and speech. They also 
take the survey course in speech correction (SPA 50) in the first semester of the 
sophomore year. 

During the junior and senior years, undergraduates take a variety of special- 
ized courses beginning with offerings such as phonetics and voice science, proceeding 
through speech pathology, hearing problems, and other courses relating to scientific 
disorders, and concluding with clinical practice. They also take related courses in 
psychology and education and sufficient electives to comprise the hours required for 
their degree. A typical sequence of courses in Speech Pathology and Audiology would 
include, in addition to SPA 50, courses numbered 152, 153, 154, 156, 157, 158, 251, 
252, 253, 276, and 277. 

Upon completion of such a program, they become eligible for a Bachelor of 
Science degree and will have completed the preparatory undergraduate work en- 
abling them to undertake graduate study in the field, after which they may seek pro- 
fessional employment. 



SUGGESTED DISTRIBUTION OF COURSES FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
DEGREE IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 

First Year 

Students will take the courses to satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements, 
and include either Biology 1 and 2 or Zoology 1 and 2 as the laboratory science. 
Available elective hours should be used to take Speech 3 (or 31) and Psychology 1. 
(Total semester hours for year— 30-36). 

Second Year 

Continuation of Core Curriculum program with available elective hours used 
for Speech 11 (or 34) and SPA 50.* (Total semester hours for year-30-36). 



°"SPA"— Speech Pathology and Audiology. 

CLINICAL STUDIES 259 



Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Si in. 


Hr. 


S< cond Sem. Hr. 


SPA 152 3 


SPA 154 


3 


SPA 158 


3 


SPA 253 3 


SPA 153 3 


SPA 157 


3 


SPA 252 


3 


SPA 277 3 


SPA 156 3 


SPA 251 


3 


SPA 276 


3 


Psychology** (or 


Psychology** (or 


Psychology* (< 


or 


SPA 277 


3 


other related 


other related 


other related 




Psychology** 


' (or 


area) 3 


area) 3 


area) 


3 


other related 


Electivesf 


Electivesf 3-6 


Electivesf 


3-6 


area) 


3 





15-18 15-18 15 15 

00 Third and fourth year psychology and related area courses will be selected from offerings 
approved by the student's adviser, and selected from the related area courses applicable toward 
i linic al certification. 

t Sufficient non-SPA electives should be chosen to make up the hours required for gradua- 
tion. 

The Bachelor of Science program is designed to provide the undergraduate 
background in speech and hearing science, speech pathology, audiology, and related 
content areas prerequisite to the continuation of the professional academic program 
at the graduate level. 

As a part of the program and in order to receive credit for Speech 277, stu- 
dents will be required to complete approximately 200 clock hours of supervised clini- 
cal practice with cases in the clinics and public schools. 

This program will enable the student to obtain provisional eertifieation in 
"speech and hearing therapy" as defined in the 1964 Standards for Accreditation 
bulletin of the West Virginia Board of Education, provided that he has fulfilled the 
academic course requirements for the General Studies curriculum and has taken the 
National Teachers Examination. Permanent State certification and eligibility for 
membership and certification by the American Speech and Hearing Association will 
require completion of a graduate degree program. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

SPA 

50. Speech Correction. II. 3 hr. Introductory course for those majoring in or 
interested in majoring in speech pathology or audiology. Fundamentals of 
evaluation and therapeutic techniques of various oral communication dis- 
orders. 

152. Basic Speech and Hearing Science. I. 3 hr. Consideration of the application 
of certain principles of the physical and social sciences to an understanding 
of the process of human oral communication. 

153. Applied Phonetics. I. 3 hr. A study of the standard speech sounds in our lan- 
guage. Use of Symbols for recording Speech sounds: application of the use of 
such symbols in representing various usages of speech; special emphasis on 
analyzing and recording defective speech. Dynamic concepts studied. 

154. Anatomy of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism. II. 3 hr. Anatomical and 
physiological study oi the vocal mechanisms and the ear. 

L56. Articulation and Voice Disorders. I. 3 hr. PR: SPA 50 or 250. A detailed con- 
sideration ol articulation and voice disorders including speech and language 

retardation and esophageal speech from an etiological, diagnostic, and thera- 
peutic point dl view. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures With these dis- 
orders w ill be developed. 

157. Hearing Problems. II. 3 hr. PR: SPA 50 or consent. General orientation to the 
field ol audiology and the specialties which are included. A survey of the 

260 



problems of the hearing-handicapped, basic hearing instruments, measurement 
procedures, and general goals of hearing therapy. 

158. Bases of Aural Rehabilitation for Children and Adults. I. 3 hr. PR: SPA 157. 
Study of the perceptive and behavioral problems of aurally handicapped 
individuals in society, and approaches to methods of alleviating and compen- 
sating for hearing loss. 

250. Survey of Oral Communication Disorders. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. A survey of 
basic concepts and principles of the disorders of speech and their treatment. 
Primary attention is given to the more common speech deviations. Students 
observe examination and corrective methods of therapists in the clinic and 
schools. Normal speech and hearing development of children is considered. 
This is an orientation course for students majoring in speech as well as 
teachers, school administrators, psychologists, and rehabilitation workers. 

251. Advanced Speech Correction. II. 3 hr. PR: SPA 156. Study of the speech- 
retarded child and organically based speech disorders including cleft palate, 
cerebral palsy, esophageal speech, and phonation. 

252. Stuttering. I. 3 hr. PR: SPA 156. Theories and therapies of stuttering. 

253. Profound Organic Speech Disorders. II. 3 hr. PR: SPA 251 or consent. Speech 
and language disorders related to cerebral injury. Emphasis on aphasia and 
aphasia therapeutics. Differential diagnosis of children with delayed speech 
language. 

271. Diagnostic Audiometries. I. 3 hr. PR: SPA 257 or consent. A study of the vari- 
ous audiometric tests outlining the dimensions of hearing. Test administration 
and interpretation. 

272. Hard of Hearing Therapy. II. 3 hr. PR: SPA 158 or consent. Bases and pro- 
cedures of acoustic training and speech reading. 

276. Procedures and Methods in Clinical Speech and Hearing. I. 3 hr. PR: SPA 

156, 157. Principles and methods of diagnosis and appraisal of disorders of 
communication. Methods of organization and administration of clinical speech 
and hearing programs in schools, hospitals, community clinics, and state and 
national services. 

277. Clinical Practice in Speech. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. Supervised diagnosis 
and therapy of speech disorders. (May be taken for a maximum of 3 semester 
hours per semester of undergraduate or graduate credit.) 

278. Clinical Practice in Hearing. I, II. 1-6 hr. PR: Consent. Supervised diagnosis 
and therapy of hearing disorders. (May be taken for a maximum of 3 semester 
hours per semester of undergraduate or graduate credit.) 



THE DIVISION OF EDUCATION 



The Division of Education is responsible for the preparation of personnel for the 
education professions. Many advances have been made in developing good learning 
conditions for children and youth. The teacher and other professionals in education 
are designing and operating educational systems to provide these optimum learning 
opportunities. The prospective teacher will be influenced as much by the way his 
classes are taught as by what he is taught. The program for the preparation of 
teachers emphasizes individual learning, flexible schedules, and student decision- 
making. 

In the self-instruction laboratory, students work as individuals or in small 
groups of their own choosing. When students feel they have mastered the particular 

EDUCATION 261 



concepts or techniques, they ask to be tested. If found proficient, they go on to other 
tasks; if not, they continue work in the laboratory, at their own pace and at their 
own convenience. 

Simulation techniques are employed using specially developed films. The stu- 
dent assumes the role of the teacher observing classroom conditions which may pre- 
vail and makes decisions at certain critical points. He then sees the consequences of 
his decision as portrayed by an actual classroom under similar conditions. The stu- 
dent, his classmates, and his professor then discuss the situation and the results. 

Micro-teaching is utilized to enable the student to teach small groups ol 
learners for short periods of time. The teaching is recorded by audio or video-tape so 
that the student may view his own teaching and analyze it by himself or with others. 
Students also have direct experiences with youngsters working as teacher-aides, tutors, 
community-center workers, and student teachers. 

Change is taking place throughout the educational world. The West Virginia 
University program attempts to reflect those changes in the experiences it offers its 
students. 

The University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Education for the preparation of elementary teachers, secondary teachers, 
school service personnel, and school administrators, with the Doctor's Degree in Edu- 
cation as the highest degree approved. 



ORIENTATION AND SELECTION 

To assist students in choosing a career in the area of teaching and to maintain 
adequate standards for admission to teacher-training, the Division of Education re- 
quires all students pursuing teacher-education programs to participate in and com- 
plete satisfactorily the Orientation and Selection Program. The student is enrolled in 
this program prior to or concurrently with the first course taken in the Division of 
Education. The transfer student who has completed the first course in Education at 
another institution is required to complete the requirements of the Orientation and 
Selection Program at the University. 



WEST VIRGINIA BOARD OF EDUCATION REGULATION 
FOR TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The West Virginia Board of Education requires that 100 of the 128 semester 
hours required for certification shall be completed in regularly scheduled campus 
courses. The 28 hours of permissible nonresidence courses may be earned by ex- 
tension home study (correspondence), radio, television, special examinations, and/or 
military service. 



RENEWAL OF PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES 

Effective September, 1963, all courses for renewal of Professional Certificates 
are selected in terms of the teacher's objectives for the improvement of instruction 
and must be recommended by the county superintendent on a form supplied by him. 
The student should have this completed form when he registers. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for recommendations for the degrees of Bachelor of Science in 
Secondary Education and Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education, a candidate 

must: 

1. Comply with the general regulations of the University concerning entrance, 
advanced standing, classification, examination, marks, grade points, etc. 



2. Satisfy the following requirements: 

a. Complete the required courses and the minimum number of hours of 
approved elective courses in Education, if any. 

b. Select and pursue subj< lization(s) for the B.S. Degree in Sec- 
ondary Education or the B.S. Degree in Elementary Education. 

c. Adhere to the patterns prescribed in completing the subject specializa- 
tion^). 

d. Present a minimum of 128 hours of approved college credit, with a 
general average of "C" as described under General Requirements for 
Certification. (English will not be counted toward meeting the total 
hours needed for graduation.) The candidate must have completed 26 
hours after enrolling in the Division of Education. 

e. Be at least 18 years of age, of good moral character, interested in edu- 
cational work, and mentally, physically, and otherwise qualified to per- 
form the duties of a teacher. 

Fulfillment of the requirements for graduation from the Division of Education, 
College of Human Resources and Education, qualifies a candidate to apply for 
recommendation for a West Virginia Professional Certificate. 

The College may require appropriate standardized tests of its graduates. 

Requirements for Temporary Certificates for Grades 1-9 or 7-12 

A Temporary Certificate, valid for one year, may be issued to applicants who 
meet the following requirements: 

1. Graduation and recommendation by the Dean of the College of Human 
Resources and Education. 

2. Three-fourths of the teaching field(s) completed. 

3. Three-fourths of Professional Education, including student teaching and 
methods, completed. 

4. For grades 1-9, three-fourths of the diversified concentration completed. 

5. Scholarship level expected of regular teacher-education students. 



NEW PROGRAM FOR TEACHER CERTIFICATION 

The following pages present a resume of teacher certification standards for all 
students entering the University besinning September, 1966. Students entering the 
University prior to September, 1966, may complete the new program if they prefer. 
By September 1, 1970, all recommendations for certification will be made on the 
basis of the requirements shown below, or as amended in subsequent catalogs. 



General Requirements for Professional Certificates 

West Virginia University standards for admission to the teacher education pro- 
gram should not be confused with the minimum State standards for certification. 
Admissions standards for elementary and secondary education are set forth on pages 
265 and 271, respectively. 

To teach in the public schools of West Virginia, one must hold a certificate 
issued by the West Virginia State Department of Education. Before any West Vir- 
ginia University applicant is eligible to receive a Professional Certificate he must 
have: (1) met the minimum State requirements, (2) met the University degree re- 
quirements, (3) been recommended by the Dean of the College of Human Resources 
and Education as herein prescribed, and (4) taken the National Teachers Examination 
(the commons and the appropriate teaching area). 

The College will inform each of its students who is a prospective teacher, and 
any other prospective teacher, upon request, of the requirements for certification, 

EDUCATION 263 



and assist him in preparing a program of study to meet these requirements. It is the 
obligation of the students who desires such counsel to arrange a conference some time 
before the end of the sophomore year. 

A candidate for certification is required to achieve a grade-point average of 
2.0 ("C") or better as follows: (1) on the total of college credits earned; (2) on the 
hours earned in Education; (3) in student teaching; and (4) in each subject special- 
ization. 

The West Virginia State Department of Education uses a system of calculating 
grade-point average for certification purposes which differs in some respects from 
West Virginia University's system. All course work attempted at West Virginia Uni- 
versity and at other institutions of collegiate grade will be considered. If a student 
earns a grade of "D", "F", or "U" on any course taken no later than the semester or 
summer term when he has attempted a total of 60 semester hours, and if he repeats 
this course one time only, the first grade shall be disregarded for the purpose of 
determining the student's grade-point average and the grade earned the second time 
shall be used. (Effective only for students entering upon college study for the first 
time in the fall semester of 1968, and thereafter.) 

The Division of Education of West Virginia University will employ the State 
Department of Education's system of calculating grade-point averages only for pur- 
poses of admission to the Division of Education, for admission to student teaching, 
and for assessing teaching field and Education averages. Academic performance and 
eligibility for graduation will be assessed by the system employed by West Virginia 
University which is to count only work taken at West Virginia University each time 
attempted. 

The Dean of the College recommends candidates for Professional Certificates 
only after the completion of work for the baccalaureate degree. To be eligible for 
recommendation by the University for any Professional Certificate, the applicant 
must have done student teaching under the supervision of the College. 

At least 45 semester hours of upper-division work, West Virginia University 
standards, are required for all teaching certificates. The qualifications herein pre- 
scribed are minimum, not optimum or maximum, and must be met by all candidates. 



PROGRAM FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS, GRADES 1-9 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education and for 
Recommendation for the Professional Certificate, Grades 1-9 

Lower-Division Work 

In preparation for admission to the Division of Education and the work of pre- 
paring for teaching in elementary schools, students will register the freshman and 
sophomore years in the pre-Edueation program of the College of Arts and Sciences 
and pursue the program of general education that the State Board of Education has 
prescribed for all students who seek recommendation for teaching certificates. This 
program of prescribed work is included in the "Program for Elementary Education 
Teachers, Grades 1-9." 

Upper-Division Work 

Admission: For admission to the prescribed courses in Elementary Education 
(Ed. 105, 100, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, and 146), students shall register the final 
two years in the Division of Education. The following will be required: 

1. A grade-point average of 2.25 on all work completed lor admission to the 

Division of Education. 

2. A grade-point average of 2.25 on all work attempted for enrollment in the 

student teaching block. 

Subject Mailer: In lower-division work students should pursue the lower- 
division required courses, so that the greatest possible number of hours taken during 

tin junior and senior years may be courses giving upper-division credit. 

Graduation and Certification'. To become eligible lor recommendation for the 

degree of Bachelor of Science in Education and for the Professional Certificate, 

264 



Grades 1-9, the student must complete the required curriculum and plan of work 
with a grade-point average of 2.0 (C) or better, as follows: (1) on the total of 
college credits earned; (2) on the hours earned in Education; (3) in the subject 
specialization; and (4) in student teaching; and have been enrolled in the Division of 
Education for at least 26 semester hours of work, including a minimum of 8 semester 
hours in student teaching and methods taken at the University. 

Program for Undergraduate Elementary Education, Grades 1-9 

Sophomore Year 

Required 
Required Courses Sem. Hr. 

Ed. 100. Orientation and Selection 1 

Junior Year 

Ed. 105. Human Growth and Development 3 

Ed. 106. Human Growth and Development 3 

Ed. 141. Introduction to Elementary Education 3 

Ed. 142. Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School 3 

Ed. 143. Mathematics in the Elementary School 2 

Senior Year 

Ed. 144. Social Studies in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 145. Science in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 146. Student Teaching in the Elementary School or 6 

Ed. 223. Clinical Experience in Elementary Education* 3 

Ed. Elective 0-3 

25 

"Students who have had three or more years of teaching experience in the elementary school 
may, upon recommendation of the Chairman of Elementary Education and approved by the 
Director of Education, take 3 semester hours of clinical experience in elementary education. 



Program for Elementary School Teachers, Grades 1-9 

Language Arts 18 

English 1, 2. Composition and Rhetoric 6 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills or 
Speech 34. Basic Speech Skills or 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation 3 

English 35, 36. Types of Literature* or 

English 135, 136. Types of Literature* 6 

Lib. Sci. 203. Library Materials for Children 3 

Social Science 24-27 

Hist. 1, 2. Western Civilization or 

Humanities 1, 2. Introductory General Course 00 6 

Soc. Sci. 1, 2. Introductory General Course** or (S 

Econ. 51. Principles of Economics and 3 

Pol. Sci. 2. American Federal System and 3 9 

Sociol. 1. Introduction to Sociology 3 

Hist. 52, 53. Growth of the American Nation 6 

Hist. 150. West Virginia or 

Hist. 250. Econ. and Social Devel. of W. Va. 3 

Geog. 7. Physical Geography, 

Geog. 8. Human Geography, or 

Geog. 109. Economic Geography 3 

"Students wishing a subject specialization in Language Arts should not take English 35, 36, 
or 135, 136. See subject specialization for Language Arts. 

°°Students wishing a subject specialization in Social Science should take Hist. 1. 2 and 
Econ. 51, Pol. Sci. 2, and Sociol. 1. See subject specialization for Social Science. 

EDUCATION 265 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 

Scien 16 

Biol. 1, 2. General Biology 8 

Phys. Sci. 1, 2. Physical Science! 8 

Mathematics 12 

Math. 56, 57. Introduction to Mathematics 6 

Math. 170. Structure of Real Number . . . 3 

Math. 171. Informal Geometry for Elementary Teachers 3 

f Students wishing a subject specialization in science, should not take Physical Science. See 
subject specialization for Science. 



Music 

Music 10. Appreciation of Music 3 

Music 11. Music As an Art and Science! 2 

Music 12. Music Materials and Procedures! - 



Art . 7 

Art 1. Creative Expression Fine Arts 2 

Art 2. Creative Expression in the Applied Arts . . 2 

Art 30. Appreciation of the Fine Arts 3 

Health and Physical Education 6 

P.E. 1. 2 (Men). General Program or 

P.E. 41, 42 (Women). Physical Education for 

Elementary Teachers 2 

P.E. 43. Phys. Ed. for Elementary Teachers 2 

Health Ed. 101. Elementary School Health Program 2 

Education 25 

Ed. 100. Orientation and Selection 1 

Ed. 105, 106. Human Growth and Development (i 

Ed. 141. Introduction to Elementary Education . 3 
Ed. 142. Reading and Language Arts 

in the Elementary School 3 

Ed. 143. Mathematics in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 144. Social Studies in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 145. Science in the Elementary School 2 

Ed. 146. Student Teaching in Elementary School 6 

{Students wishing a subject specialization in Music should not take Music II L2 Se< 
\<-< t specialization for Mum. 



Subject Specializations 

I In Professional Certificate, Grades L-9, must he endorsed with at least one 
subject specialization for teaching in Grades 1 through <). Below are listed the cate- 
gories of work leu' each. For each subject specialization suggested, University course's 
to implement the Stale recommendations arc listed. The listed course's have been 
suggested by the departments concerned and approved 1>> the College. 






Required 
Sem. Hr. 



SUBJECT SPECIALIZATIONS FOR GRADES 1 THROUGH 9 

ART 24 

a. Required Courses 19 

Art 1. Creative Expression in Fine Arts 2 

Art 2. Creative Expression in Applied Arts 2 

Art 11 or 111. Drawing 3 

Art 113 or 114. Painting 3 

Art 121. Fundamental of Design 3 

Art 126. Modeling 3 

Art 30. Appreciation of the Arts* 3 

b. Approved Electives: 5 

Art 12 or 112. Drawing 3 

Art 113, 114, 117, 118. Painting 3 

Art 122. Fundamental of Design 3 

Art 127. Fundamental of Sculpture 3 

Art 220. Art and the Schools 2 

^Included in the program of General Requirements. 



HOME ECOXOMICS-GRADES 1-9 24 

Required Courses 

Textiles and Clothing 6 

TC 2. Principles of Clothing Construction 1 

TC 17. Textiles Uny two 6 

TC 102. Clothing for the Family J 

Food and Nutrition 6 

FN 1. Elementary Nutrition or 

FN 15. Food Selection and Preparation 3 

FN 121. Nutrition for the Family or 

FN 135. Food and People 3 

Child Development and Family Relations 6 

CDFR 106. Child Development or 

CDFR 266. Needs of Adolescents 3 

CDFR 114. Family Relations or 

CDFR 264. Family Development 3 

Home Management, Household Equipment, and 

Family Economics 3 

HMFE 210. Family Economics or 

HMFE 230. Home Management, Principles and 

Application 3 



Housing, Including Home Furnishings 
HD 3. Introduction to Related Art or 
HD 23. Housing Design or 
HD 123. Interior Design 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES-GRADES 1-9° 

FRENCH 24 

Required Courses 

French 1, 2. Elementary French 6 

French 3, 4. Intermediate French 6 

French 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

French 109. Grammar and Pronunciation 3 

French 110. Advanced Conversation 3 

EDUCATION 



GERMAN 

Required Courses 

German 1, 2. Elementary German 

German 3, 4. Intermediate German 

German 103, 104. Spoken German 

German 109. Advanced Grammar and Composition 

German 110. Advanced Composition and Conversation 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 
24 



"Students who have been excused from elementary or intermediate courses will take addi- 
tional work to satisfy the total semester hour requirement. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

RUSSIAN 

Required Courses 

Russian 1, 2. Elementary Russian 

Russian 3, 4. Intermediate Russian 

Russian 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 

Russian 144, 145. Survey of Russian Literature 



SPANISH 

Required Courses 

Spanish 1, 2. Elementary Spanish 
Spanish 3, 4. Intermediate Spanish 
Spanish 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 
Spanish 109. Grammar and Conversation 
Spanish 110. Advanced Conversation 



LATIN 

Required Courses 

Latin 1, 2. Elementary Latin 

Latin 3. Intermediate Latin 

Latin 4. Cicero's Orations 

Humanities 101. Classical Culture in the Modern World 

Latin 109. Selections from Roman Prose 

Latin 110. Selections from Roman Poetry 

Latin 121 . Survey of Latin Literature 



LANGUAGE ARTS-GRADES 1-9 

Required Courses 

English 1, 2. Composition and Rhetoric* 

English 111. The English Language 

Lib. Sci. 203. Backgrounds of Children's Literature* 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills or 

Speech 34. Basic Speech Skills* or 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation* 

English 142. Shakespeare 

English 3 or 163. Survey: English Literature I 00 

English 1 oi L64. Survey: English Literature II* 

English 5. American Literature I°° 

English 6. American Literature II 00 

Approved Electives 

English I IS. World Literature or . 
Humanities 1 41. Creal Books I or 
Humanities L42. Greal Books II 



24 



24 



24 



33 



'Included in the program oi Genera] Requirements. 
••These courses waive and supersede English 35, 38 and 135, 136 in the program of 
< .' qi i.ii Requirenv ots. 

268 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 

MATHEMATICS-GRADES 1-9 21-23 

Required Courses 15-16 
Math. 56, 57. Introductory Mathematics for 

Elementary Teachers 6 

Math. 170. Structure of the Real Numbers System 3 

Math. 171. Informal Geometry for Elementary Teachers 3 
Math. 264, 265. Foundations of Algebra, 4 hr., or 

Math. 236. Introduction to Abstract Algebra 3- 4 

Approved Electives 6-7 

Math. 237. Linear Algebra 3 

Math. 247. Theory of Numbers ....... 3 

Math. 266, 267. Foundation of Geometry, 4 hr., or 

Math. 138. Modern Geometry for Teachers, 3 hr 3-4 

Math. 8. Finite Mathematics 3 

Math. 31. Introduction to Computing 3 



MUSIC-GRADES 1-9 24 

Required Courses 

Music 150. Applied Music (Including at least 1 hour in Voice 

and 1 hour in Piano) 5 

Music 80, 81, 86. (Woodwind or Percussion CI.) 1 

Music 1-4. Theory 8 

Music 100, 102, 103, 105. (Band, Orchestra, Choral) 2 

Music 138. Introduction to Music History 3 

Music 181. Music Education— Elementary 3 

Music 183. Conducting 2 



sub 



NOTE: Music 11, 12 are not required and do not fulfill requirements for Music as a 
ject specialization. 

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION-GRADES 1-9 19 

Required Courses 

P.E. 180. The Physical Education Program in the Elementary 
School or 

P.E. 43. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers* 2 

H.Ed. 101. The Elementary School Health Program 2 

Dance 132. Folk Dancing 2 

S.Ed. 127. Accident Prevention and First Aid 2 

P.E. 71. Orientation in Physical Education 2 

P.E. 175. Anatomy and Kinesiology 5 

P.E. 31, 32. (Women) Team Sports 2 

( Women ) Graded Games and Lead-Up Games 1 

( Women ) Stunts, Tumbling, and Trampoline 1 

(Men) Fundamentals of Baseball and Gymnastics . 2 

(Men) Junior and Senior High School Activities 2 

SCHOOL LIBRARIAN-GRADES 1-9 18 

Required Courses 

Lib. Sci. 101. Reference and Bibliography 3 

Lib. Sci. 203. Library Materials for Children 3 

Lib. Sci. 205. Selection of Books and Related Materials for 

Secondary School Libraries 3 

Lib. Sci. 207. School Library Organization and Adm. 3 

Lib. Sci. 222. Field Practice 3 

Lib. Sci. 223. Cataloging and Classification 3 

EDUCATIOS 269 



P.E. 


66. 


P.E. 


61. 


P.E. 


51. 


P.E. 


53. 



Required 

Sem. Hr. 

Students qualifying for school librarian arc advised to take: 

Lib. Sci. 1. Using Books and Libraries 3 

Lib. Sci. 235. Library in the Elementary School 3 

Ed. 221. Audio-Visual Resources for Instruction 3 

SCIENCE-GRADES 1-9 . .31 

Required Courses 

Biol. 1, 2. General Biology* 8 

Chem. 11, 12. General Chemistry** 8 

Physics 1, 2. Introductory General Courses** 8 

Astron. 106. Descriptive Astronomy 3 

Geol. 5. Introduction to Geology and 

Geol. 2. Physical Geology Laboratory 4 

"Included in the program of General Requirements. 
° "These courses waive and supersede Physical Science 1, 2 in the program of General Re- 
quirements. 

Suggested Additional Courses 

Forestry 140. West Virginia's Natural Resources 3 

Biol. 203. Natural History 3 

Biol. 204. Biology Workshop 3 

Biol. 208. Great Texts of Biology 1 

Biol. 210. Biological Science for High School Teachers 3 

Bot. 266. Flora of West Virginia 3 

SOCIAL STUDIES-GRADES 1-9 33 

Required Courses 27 

Hist. 1, 2. Western Civilization* 6 

Econ. 51. Principles of Economics** and 

Pol. Sci. 2. American Federal System** and 

Sociol. 1. Introduction to Sociology** 9 

Hist. 52, 53. Growth of the American Nation* 6 

Hist. 150. West Virginia* 3 

Geog. 7. Physical Geography* 

Geog. 8. Human Geography* or 

Geog. 109. Economic Geography* 3 

Elective Courses 6 

Six semester hours, in addition to courses taken in the General Studies pro- 
gram, are to be chosen from one of the five areas below: 

Hist. 103. Modern Europe 1500-1763 3 

Hist. 104. Modern Europe 1763-1871 3 

Hist. 105. Modern Europe 1871 to Present 3 

Hist. 151. American Colonial and Revolutionary Exp. 3 

Hist. 152. The Early Republic, United States 3 

Hist. 153. The United States, 1865-1918 3 

Hist. 154. Recent America, United States 3 

Econ. 52. Principles of Economics 3 

and one additional course 3 

Sociol. 104. Social Problems 3 

and one additional course 3 

Pol. Sci. 1. Elements of Democratic Government 3 

Pol. Sci. 120. State and Local Government 3 

Pol. Sci. 160. International Relations 3 

Pol. Sci. 221. W. Va. Government and Adm 3 

270 



Geog. 7. Physical Geography 
Geog. 8. Human Geography* or 
Geog. 109. Economic Geography 
and one additional course 



"Included in the program of General Requirements. 
° "These courses waive and supersede Soc. Sci. 1, 2 in the program of General Requirements. 

SPEECH-GRADES 1-9 21 

Required Courses 18 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills* 3 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation" 3 

Speech 80. Introduction to Broadcasting 3 

SPA 250. Survey of Oral Communication Disorders 3 

Speech 275. Speech Problem of Children or 

Speech 153. Applied Phonetics 3 

Drama 282. Creative Dramatics 3 

Elective course 3 

•Included in program of General Requirements— one of which will have been selected. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIOX-GRADES N-6* 

Required Courses 18 

CDFR 105. Child Development I 3 

CDFR 106. Child Development II 3 

CDFR 224. Family and the Individual in Society 3 

Educ. 200. Early Childhood Education I 3 

Educ. 201. Early Childhood Education II 3 

Speech 275. Speech Problems of Children 3 

"Students who wish to be certified in Early Childhood Education, N-6, will do student 
teaching at the Nursery School-Kindergarten and elementary school levels. Students electing this 
subject specialization will not be eligible to teach in junior high school unless a subject speciali- 
zation, grades 1-9, is also elected. 



PROGRAMS FOR PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES 
JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education and for 
Recommendation for the Professional Certificate, Grades 7-12 

Lower-Division Work 

In preparation for admission to the College of Human Resources and Education 
and the work of preparing for teaching in the junior and senior high school, students 
will register for the freshman and sophomore years in the College of Arts and 
Sciences and pursue their prescribed program in preparation for teacher certification 
under the direction of the pre-education adviser. 

Upper-Division Work 

With the completion of 58 semester hours of approved college work and the 
attainment of a 2.25 average, a student is eligible to enter the College of Human 
Resources and Education. To become eligible for recommendation for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education and for the Professional Certificate, Grades 7-12. 
the student must complete the requirements described in the General Requirements 
for the Professional Certificate. The College will lend guidance and advice to stu- 
dents in any other department of the University who desire secondary teacher certifi- 
cation. 

An overall grade-point average of 2.25 is required for admission to student 
teaching. 

EDUCATION 271 



Program for Secondary Education Teachers 

Required 

Sem. Hr. 

1. GENERAL STUDIES 50-58 

Required Courses 

HUMANITIES (18-22) 21 

English 1, 2. Composition and Rhetoric 6 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills or 
Speeeh 34. Basic Speech Skills or 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation 3 

English 35, 36. Types of Literature or 
English 135, 136. Introduction to Literature 6 

Art 30. Appreciation of the Fine Arts 3 

Music 10. Appreciation of Music 3 

"Students who qualify for certification in the field of English or in Language Arts will take 
English 3, 4 (or 163, 164) and 5, 6 instead of English 35, 36 or English 135, 136. 

SCIENCE 8-10 

Biol. 1, 2. General Biology or 

Phys. Sci. 1, 2. Introductory General* or 8 

Any one of the following full-year sequences: 

Chem. 11, 12 8 

Chem. 15, 16 8 

Geol. 1, 2 8 

Geol. 3, 4 8 

Physics 1, 2 8 

Physics 11, 102 8 

°Physical Science 1 and 2 should not be taken by any student who intends to have a teach- 
ing field in any one of these sciences. 

MATHEMATICS 4 

Math. 21, 22. Introduction to Mathematics or 4 

Math. 15. Calculus I 4 

SOCIAL STUDIES 00 12-17 

Hist. 1, 2. Western Civilization or 6 

Humanities 1, 2. Introductory General Course 8 

Econ. 51. Principles of Economics 

Pol. Sci. 2. American Federal System 9 

Sociol. 1. Introduction to Sociology or 

Soc. Sci. 1, 2. Introductory General Course 6 

PHYSICAL AND HEALTH EDUCATION 4- 6 

For Men: P.E. 1, 2 2 

For Women: Four semesters of course work, chosen from 

P.E. 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 25 4 

Health I'd. 102 2 

°°Stii(lci)ts who plan to qualify ill the field of Social Sciences should take I list. 1 and 2 and 
courses in Economies, Political Science, and Sociology. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION-SECONDARY 

Required Courses 22 

Psychological Foundation for Teaching 7 

Ed. 100. Orientation and Selection 1 

Ed. 105, 106. Human Growth and Development 6 

272 



Required 
Sent. Ur. 



Management, Materials and Methods 

Ed. 120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools . . 4 

(Includes basic work in reading, audio-visual and guidance.) 

Ed. 124. Student Teaching 6 

Ed. 125. Student Teaching (Music) 4 
Select one below related to student teaching field 

Ed. 150. Science - 

Ed. 152. Physical Education 2 

Ed. 153. Foreign Languages 2 

Ed. 155. Library Science 2 

Ed. 160. Vocational Agriculture 3 

Ed. 161. English and Speech 2 

Ed. 163. Home Economics 2 

Ed. 164. Industrial Arts 2 

Ed. 165. Mathematics 2 

Ed. 167. Social Studies 2 

Ed. 168. Art 2 

Ed. 169. Music 2 

Ed. 170. Commerce 2 

Elective 3 



2. TEACHING FIELDS-GRADES 7-12 

VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE-Comprehensive 45-47 

Required Courses— Core Program 28 

Agr. 52. Principles of Plant Science 4 

Ag. Econ. 104. Farm Management 3 

Ag. Econ. 180. Assigned Topics 3 

Ag. Educ. 118. Group Organization and Leadership 2 

Ag. Mech. 152. Shop Theory and Methods 3 

Ag. Mech. 253. Advanced Farm Machinery 3 

AI & VS 51. Principles of Animal Science 4 

Agron. 2. Principles of Soil Science 4 

Agr. 11, 12. Professions in Agriculture 2 

Agricultural education majors will satisfy requirements in mathematics bv completing 
Math. 3. 



Areas of Agricultural Minors (select one) 

A. Agricultural Production and Management 18 

Required Courses 15 

Ag. Econ. 131. Marketing Agricultural Products 3 

An. Prod. 108. Animal Production Experience, or 

An. Prod. 122. Milk Production, or 

An. Prod. 138. Grading and Selection of Meat and Meat 
Animals, or 

An. Prod. 141. Beef Production, or 

An. Prod. 162. Sheep Production 6 

For. 183. Farm Woods Management 3 

Hort. 242. Small Fruit Production or 

Agron. 254. Pasture and Forage Crops 3 

Approved Electives 3 

Ag. Econ. 131, 230; Ag. Mech. 252, 253, 259. 270. 275; Agron. 
210, 250; An. Nutrn. 101; Bact. 141; Food Sci. 124; Hort. 115, 
117, 204; Plant Path. 201; Vet. Sci. 102. 

EDUCATlO\ 273 



Required 

Scm. Hr. 

B. Animal Processing 17 

Required Courses 10 

Food Sci. 12. Dairy Technology 3 

Food Sci. 106. Poultry Products Technology 2 

Food Sci. 124. Judging Dairy Products 2 

Food Sci. 167. Meats 3 

Electives ........... 7 

An. Xutrn. 101; An. Physiol. 280; An. Prod. 122, 138, 141, 162. 
201: Bact. 141; Food Sci. 107; Vet. Sci. 102. 

C. Agricultural Mechanics 17 

Required Courses 12 

Ag. Mech. 152. Shop Theory and Method 3 

Ag. Mech. 259. Farm Structures 3 

Ag. Mech. 270. Electricity in Agriculture 3 

Ag. Mech. 275. Agricultural Engines 3 

Electives 5 

Ag. Mech 252, 253; I.E. 7, 11, 15. 

D. Agricultural Sales and Service 18 

Ag. Econ. 110. Agribusiness Accounting 3 

Ag. Econ. 131. Marketing Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Econ. 230. Cooperative Organization 3 

Ag. Econ. 235. Marketing Dairy Products 3 

Ag. Econ. 240. Agricultural Prices 3 

Ag. Econ. 261. Agribusiness Finance 3 

E. Conservation 17 

Required Courses 12 

Agron. 212. Soil Conservation Management 3 

For. 140. West Virginia Natural Resources 3 

For. 183. Farm Woods Management 3 

Hort. 229. Landscape Design 3 

Electives 5 

Agron. 210, 250; Bot. 67; For. 11, 147, 212, 251; Rec. 11. 

F. Horticulture Produce Industry 17 

Hort. 107. General Horticulture 3 

Hort. 141. Greenhouse Management 3 

Hort. 180. Seminar 2 

Hort. 242. Small Fruits 3 

Hort. 243. Physiology of Vegetables 3 

Hort. 244. Handling and Storage of Horticultural Crops ... 3 

G. Ornamental Horticulture L9 

Required Courses 13 

Agron. 250. Turfgrass Management 3 

Hort. 107. General Horticulture 3 

Hort. 116. Flower Judging . 1 

Hort. 141. Greenhouse Management 3 

Hort. 204. Plant Propagation . 3 

Electives 6 

Agron. 210; Bot. 171; Hort. 160, 161, 229. 

ART 33 

Required Courses 

Art 121, 122. Fundamentals of Design 6 

Art 1 1 or 111. Drawing and 

Art 12 or 112. Drawing 6 

274 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 



Art 30. Appreciation of the Fine Arts" 

Art 105, 106. Survey of Art 

Art 113, 114. Painting 

Art 123. Lettering 

Art 127. Modeling— Sculpture 

Approved Electives 

Art 126. Modeling 

Art 117, 118. Painting 



BUSINESS EDUCATION (Comprehensive) 35 

Accntg. 1, 2. Principles of Accounting 6 

Accntg. 111. Intermediate Accounting or 

Accntg. 115. Cost Accounting 3 

Math. 8. Elementary Mathematics 3 

Bus. Law 111. Business Law 3 

Mktg. 111. Principles of Marketing or 

Mktg. 115. Principles of Retailing 3 

Econ. 51, 52. Principles of Economics 6 

Sec. Studies 62. Typewriting 2 

Sec. Studies 126. Shorthand 4 

Sec. Studies 131. Secretarial Training and Office Practice 3 

Sec. Studies 132. Transcription 2 

BUSINESS EDUCATION-SECRETARIAL STUDIES 25 

Required Courses 21 

Sec. Studies 62. Typewriting 2 

Sec. Studies 126. Shorthand 4 

Sec. Studies 131. Secretarial Training and Office Practice . . 3 

Math. 8. Elementary Mathematics 3 

Accntg. 1, 2. Principles of Accounting 6 

Sec. Studies 132. Transcription 3 

Elective Courses 4 

Sec. Studies 51. Business Communications 3 

Sec. Studies 61. Typewriting 2 

Sec. Studies 125. Shorthand 4 

Accntg. 111. Intermediate Accounting 3 

Accntg. 115. Cost Accounting 3 

Econ. 51, 52. Principles of Economics 6 

ENGLISH 39 

Required Courses 

English 1, 2. Composition and Rhetoric* 6 

English 111. The English Language 3 

English 3 or 163. Survey: English Literature (I) 3 

English 4 or 164. Survey: English Literature (II) 3 

English 5, 6. American Literature 6 

English 142. Shakespeare 3 

Upper-Division course in American Literature 

(English 166, 250, 270) 3 

Upper-Division course in a major author or period before 1660 

(English 140, 141, 234, 244, 245) 3 

Upper-Division course in a major author or period after 1660 

(English 138, 139, 247, 248, 249, 257, 258) 3 

"Included in the program of General Requirements. 



EDUCATIOX 



275 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 
Upper-Division course including foreign literature in English 

translation I English 118, 278, 280; Humanities 141, 142) 3 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills* or 
Speech 34. Basic Speech Skills or 
Drama 50. Oral Interpretation 3 

"Included in the program of General Requirements. 

NOTE: For students in the English program, the courses in English, American, and foreign 
literature supersede and waive the requirements of English 35 and 36 or 136 and 136 in General 
Studies. 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 36 

Required Courses 

French 1, 2. Elementary French 6 

French 3, 4. Intermediate French 6 

French 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

French 109. Grammar and Conversation 3 

French 110. Advanced Conversation 3 

French 115. The Classical School 3 

French 118. Literature of the 19th Century 3 

French 217. French Civilization 3 

Linguistics 111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics 3 

Approved Electives 

French 116. Literature of the 19th Century 3 

French 222. French Realism 3 

French 231. Phonetics and Pronunciation 3 

•These courses may be chosen to complete the 36-hour program of a student who, because 
of high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. They may be 
substituted for French 118 and 217 with the approval of the adviser. 

FRENCH (As another field) 24 

Required Courses 

French 1, 2. Elementary French 6 

French 3, 4. Intermediate French 6 

French 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

French 109. Grammar and Conversation 3 

French 110. Advanced Conversation 3 

Approved Electives* 

French 118. Literature of the 19th Century 3 

French 217. French Civilization 3 

French 222. French Realism 3 

•These courses may be chosen to complete the 24-hour program of a student who, because 
of high school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. 

NOTE: Students selecting German, Spanish, or Russian as a specialization maj qualify fbl 
teaching French by completing the 24-semester-hour program. 

GERMAN 36 

Required Courses 

German 1, 2. Elementary German 6 

German 3, 4. Intermediate German 

German 103, 104. Spoken German 6 

German L05, 106. The German Novelle . . 6 

German 107. Nineteenth Century Drama 3 

German 109, 110. Advanced Grammar and Composition 6 

Linguistics 111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics 3 

276 



Required 

Sem. Hi. 
Approved Electives* 

German 108. Nineteenth Century Drama 3 

German 161. Lyric Poetry 3 

* These courses may be chosen to complete the 36-hour program of a student who, because 
of high school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. They may be 
substituted for German 106 and 107 with the approval of the adviser. 



GERMAN ( As another field) 24 

German 1, 2. Elementary German 6 

German 3, 4. Intermediate German 3 

German 103, 104. Spoken German 6 

German 109, 110. Advanced Grammar and Composition 6 

Approved Electives* 

German 106. The German Novelle 3 

German 107. Nineteenth Century Drama 3 

°These courses may be chosen to complete the 24-hour program of a student who, because 
of high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. 

NOTE: Students selecting French, Russian or Spanish as a specialization may qualify for 
teaching German by completing the 24-semester-hour program. 

RUSSIAN 33 

Required Courses 

Russian 1, 2. Elementary Russian 6 

Russian 3, 4. Intermediate Russian 6 

Russian 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

Russian 144, 145. Survey of Russian Literature 6 

Russian 211, 212. The Russian Novel 6 

Linguistics 111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics 3 



RUSSIAN (As another field) 24 

Required Courses 

Russian 1, 2. Elementary Russian 6 

Russian 3, 4. Intermediate Russian 6 

Russian 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

Russian 144, 145. Survey of Russian Literature 6 

Approved Electives* 

Russian 211, 212. The Russian Novel 6 

"These courses may be chosen to complete the 24-hour program of a student who, because 
of high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. 

NOTE: Students selecting German, French or Spanish as a specialization may qualify for 
teaching Russian by completing the 24-semester-hour program. 



SPANISH 36 

Required Courses 

Spanish 1, 2. Elementary Spanish 6 

Spanish 3, 4. Intermediate Spanish 6 

Spanish 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

Spanish 109, 110. Grammar and Conversation 6 

Spanish 212. Spanish Literature Since 1870 3 

Spanish 216. Spanish Civilization and Culture 3 

Spanish 221. Literature of the Golden Age to 1635 3 

Linguistics 111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics 3 

EDUCATION 277 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 
Approved Electives* 

Spanish 211. 19th Century Literature to 1870 . 3 

Spanish 217. Spanish-American Literature and Culture 3 

Spanish 222. The Golden Age to Lope de Vega 3 

"These courses may be- chosen to complete the 36-hour program of a student who, because 

oi high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. They may be 
substituted for Spanish 212 and 216 with the approval of the adviser. 

SPANISH (As another field) 24 

Required Courses 

Spanish 1, 2. Elementary Spanish 6 

Spanish 3, 4. Intermediate Spanish 6 

Spanish 103, 104. Elementary Conversation 6 

Spanish 109, 110. Grammar and Conversation 6 

Approved Electives* 

Spanish 212. Spanish Literature Since 1870 3 

Spanish 216. Spanish Civilization and Culture 3 

Spanish 217. Spanish-American Literature and Culture 3 

Spanish 222. The Golden Age to Lope de Vega 3 

"These courses may be chosen to complete the 24-hour program of a student who. because 
of high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses. 

NOTE: Students selecting French, German, or Russian as a specialization may qualif) lor 
teaching Spanish by completing the 24-semester-hour program. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

LATIN 36 

Required Courses 

Humanities 102. Classical Myths in the Modem World 3 

Latin 1, 2. Elementary Latin 6 

Latin 3. Intermediate Latin 3 

Latin 4. Cicero's Orations 3 

Latin 109. Selection from Roman Prose 3 

Latin 110. Selections from Roman Poetry 3 

Latin 121. Survey of Latin Literature 3 

Latin 131. Latin Prose Composition . 3 

I ,atin 202. Roman Comedy 3 

Latin 231. Roman Satire 3 

Linguistics 111. Introduction to Structural Linguistics 3 

Approved Electives* 

Latin 234. Roman Historians 3 

Latin 235. Roman Epic 3 

•These courses may be chosen to complete the 36-hour program of a student who, because 

of high-school credits, has been excused from elementary or intermediate courses, Thej maj be 
substituted for any of the literature courses above with the approval of the adviser. 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL, AND SAFETY EDUCATION* 40 

Required Courses 27 

Athletic Training 2 

Anatomy and Kinesiology 5 

The Adapted Program in Phys. Ed. 2 

History and Principles <>l Phys. I'd. 3 

Administratiorj of Physical Education 3 



P.E. 


121. 


P.E. 


1 75. 


P.E. 


17fi. 


P.E. 


177. 


P.E. 


27S. 



27 H 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 



H.Ed. 2. Personal and Community Health 

H.Ed. 102. The Secondary School Health Program 
S.Ed. 127. Accident Prevention and First Aid 
S.Ed. 181. Principles of Safety Education 
Zool. 271. Human Physiology 



P.E. 
P.E. 
P.E. 
P.E. 
P.E. 



33. 
54. 
61. 
63. 
66. 



Physical Education Activity Area (To be taken by women) 13 

P.E. 31, 32. Team Sports ' 2 

Swimming and Diving 1 

Individual and Dual Sports 2 

Stunts, Tumbling, and Trampoline 

Hockey and Volleyball 

Graded Games and Lead-up Games 

Dance 5. Ballroom Dance 

Dance 35. Modern Dance Techniques 

Dance 36. Movement and Its Rhythmic Structure 2 

Dance 132. Folk Dancing 1 

Physical Education Activity Area (To be taken by men) 13 

P.E. 51. Fundamentals of Tumbling and Gymnastics 2 
P.E. 52. Advanced Swimming, Lifesaving, and 

Water Safety 1 

P.E. 53. Jr. and Sr. High School Activities and Games 2 

P.E. 54. Individual and Dual Sports 2 

P.E. 55. Fundamentals of Baseball, Basketball, Wrestling . . 2 

P.E. 56. Fundamentals of Track and Football 2 

Dance 5. Ballroom Dance 1 

Dance 132. Folk Dancing 1 

°Students who wish to be certified in Physical Education 1-12 will do student teaching at 
the elementary and secondary levels. 



HOME ECONOMICS (Comprehensive) 

Required Courses 

CDFR 114. Family Relations ... 3 

TC 2. Principles of Clothing Construction 3 

FN 1. Elementary Nutrition 3 

HMFE 230. Home Management, Principles and 

Application 3 

HD 3. Introduction to Related Art 3 

Restricted Electives 

Elect 5 hours 

CDFR 106 

CDFR 126 

CDFR 264 

CDFR 266 



40 



Child Development 3 

Infant Development 2 

Family Development 3 

Needs of Adolescents 3 



Elect 5 hours 

TC 17. Textiles 3 

TC 102. Clothing for the Family 3 

TC 217. Textiles for the Consumer 3 

TC 222. Tailoring 3 



Elect 5 hours 

FN 15. Food Selection and Preparation 

FN 115. Meal Planning, Preparation, and Service 

FN 135. Food and People 

FN 221. Community Nutrition Problems 



15 



25 



/.'/)( C.\/7('.\ 



279 



Required 
Sern. Hr. 



Elect 5 hours 

HMFE 120. Demonstration Techniques 2 

1 [MFE 210. Family Economics 3 

HMFE 250. Household Equipment 2 

Elect 5 hours 

HD 23. Housing Design 3 

HD 123. Interior Design 3 

HD 223. Advanced Interior Design 3 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

No new students are being accepted in the undergraduate Industrial Arts pro- 
gram at this time. An extensive curriculum development project is being undertaken 
for the purpose of establishing a more modern and relevant curriculum model of 
Industrial Arts teacher education. 



JOURNALISM 21 

Required Courses 15 

Journ. 1. Introduction to Mass Communications 2 

Journ. 18. News Writing 3 

Journ. 19. Copy Editing and Makeup 3 

Journ. 120. Introduction to Photography 2 

Journ. 215. High-School Journalism 2 

Joum. 227. History of Journalism 3 

Approved Electives 6 

Journ. 2. Lectures in Journalism 1 

Typography and Printing Processes 2 

Principles of Advertising 3 

Reporting 3 

Radio and Television Reporting 2 

Interpreting Current Events 1 

Law of News Media 3 

Editorial Writing 3 

Journalism Problems 1-3 

NOTE: All electives listed may be counted toward a Bachelor's Degree in Journalism Edu- 
cation. 



LANGUAGE ARTS (Comprehensive) 56 

English 36 

English 1, 2. Composition and Rhetoric 6 

English 3 or 163. Survey: English Literature (I) 3 

English 4 or 164. Survey: English Literature (II) 3 

English 5. American Literature (I) 3 

English 6. American Literature (II) 3 

English 111. The English Language 3 

English 142. Shakespeare 3 

Upper-Division course in American Literature 

(English 166, 250, 270) 3 

Upper-Division course in a major author Or period before L660 

( English 140, 141, 234, 244, 245) 3 

Upper-DivisiOO course in a major author or period alter L660 

I nglish 138, 139, 247, 248, 249, 257, 258) 3 

Upper-Division course including foreign literature in English 
translation (English IIS. 278, 280; Humanities Ml. L42) 3 

280 



Journ. 


110. 


Journ. 


113. 


Journ. 


118. 


Journ. 


122. 


Journ. 


201. 


Journ. 


228. 


Journ. 


230. 


Journ. 


241. 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 

Speech 15 

Speech 34. Basic Speech Skills* 3 

Speech 121. Argumentation and Debate 3 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation* 3 

Drama 75. Acting 3 

Drama 180. Directing 3 

Journalism 5 

Journ. 18. News Writing 3 

Journ. 215. High School Journalism 2 

"Included in the program of General Studies. 

NOTE: For the student completing the Language Arts field, the requirements here listed 
supersede and waive the requirement of English 35 and 36, or 135 and 136, in General Studies. 

MATHEMATICS (Comprehensive) 30 

Required Courses 

Math. 15. Calculus I 4 

Math. 16. Calculus II 4 

Math. 236. Introduction to Algebraic Structures 3 hr., or 

Math. 264, 265. Foundations of Algebra, 4 hr 3-4 

Math. 237. Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 

Math. 138. Modern Geometry for Teachers, 3 hr., or 

Math. 266, 267. Foundations of Geometry, 4 hr., or 

Math. 243. Projective Geometry, 3 hr 3-4 

Approved Electives (A minimum of three courses from the list of 
elective courses is required.) 

Math. 8. Finite Mathematics 3 

Math. 17. Calculus III 4 

Math. 31. Introduction to Computing 3 

Math. 148. History of Mathematics 3 

Math. 220. Numerical Analysis 3 

Math. 235. Foundations of Algebra and Analysis 3 

Math. 208. Theory of Probability, 3 hr., or 

Math. 268, 269. Probability and Statistics, 4 hr 3-4 

Math. 247. Theory of Numbers 3 

MUSIC ( Comprehensive) 69-75 

Required Courses 

Music 1-8 16 

Music 80-86. Instrumental Classes 5-7 

Music 117. Instrumentation 

Music 118. Orchestration and Band Arranging 2-4 

Music 120. Choral Arranging 

Music 140, 141. History of Music 6 

Music 181, 182. (Elem. 3; Sec. 3) 6 

Music 183, 184. Conducting 4 

Music 100-105 8-10 

Music 100. Band 

Music 102. Choral Union 

Music 103. University Symphony Orchestra 

Music 105. Choir 

Music 150. Applied Music 22 

Instruments 5-16 
Piano 4-16 
Voice 2-16 

EDUCATION 281 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 

(The student completes Level 7 technical proficiency in Music 150 which 
requires the equivalent of 16 hours of Instrument, or Piano, or Voice study, and the 
minimum as shown by the first figure in each of the other two Applied areas. ) 

Approved Electives* 

Music 20. Introduction to Opera Theatre 2 

Music 155. Chamber Music 1 

Music 210. Opera Theatre . 2 

Music- 252. Analysis of Musical Form 3 

"Although no eleeth es are included in the requirements for the degree or the certificate, it 
is recommended that the student take as many of the "approved electives" as possible. 

SAFETY EDUCATION 15 

Required Courses 

S.Ed. 181. Principles of Safety Education 2 

S.Ed. 182. Techniques and Procedures in Driver and 

Traffic Safety Education 3 

S.Ed. 282. Problems in Driver and Traffic Safety Education . 3 

Approved Electives 

P.E. 52. Advanced Swimming, Lifesaving, and Water Safety 1 

P.E. 121. Athletic Training and First Aid 2 

P.E. 124. Instructorship in Swimming, Lifesaving, and 

Water Safety 1 

S.Ed. 127. Accident Prevention and First Aid 2 

S.Ed. 280. Programs in Safety Education 3 

S.Ed. 281. Driver and Traffic Safety Education Programs 3 

S.Ed. 283. Philosophy of Safety Education 3 

(S.Ed. 127, 181 and P.E. 52, 121 appear in Health, Physical, and 
Safety Education Program.) 

•Approved as a third area of specialization or a second area of specialization with a com- 
prehensive program for grades 7-12. 

NOTE: Students with specialization in Safety Education should select Ed. 221 as part of 
their program of Professional Education. 

SCHOOL LIBRARIAN 18 

Required Courses* 

Lib. Sci. 101. Reference and Bibliography 3 

Lib. Sci. 203. Library Materials for Children 3 
Lib. Sci. 205. Selection of Books and Related Materials 

for Young People 3 

Lib. Sci. 207. School Library Organization and Administration 3 

Lib. Sci. 222. Field Practice 3 

Lib. Sci. 223. Cataloging and Classification 3 

Approved Elective 

Lib. Sci. 1. Using Books and Libraries 3 

Students qualifying for certification in this field must elect Ed. 221. Audio-Visual Re- 
sources for Instruction, as part o( their program of Professional Education, student teaching cannot 
be done in Library Science hut must he done in another teaching field. 

SOCIAL STUDIES (Comprehensive) 48 

History 24 

Required Courses 

Hist. 1, 2. Western Civilization 6 

282 



Required 
Sem. Hr. 

Hist. 52. Growth of the American Nation to 1865 3 

Hist. 53. Making of Modern America 3 

Upper-Division Course in American History 00 3 

Hist. 150. West Virginia 3 

Hist. 151. American Colonial and Rev. Exp. 3 

Hist. 152. The Early Republic, United States 3 

Hist. 153. The United States, 1865 to 1918 3 

Hist. 154. Recent America, U. S. Since 1918 3 

Approved Electives ( May include an additional course in 

American History, listed above) 9 

Hist. 103. Modern Europe, 1500-1763 3 

Hist. 104. Modern Europe, 1763-1871 3 

Hist. 105. Modern Europe, 1871 to Present 3 

Hist. 106. British Civilization to 1660 3 

Hist. 107. British Civilization Since 1660 3 

Government 6 

Pol. Sci. 2. The American Federal System 3 

One of the following: 3 

Pol. Sci. 1. Elements of Democratic Government 

Pol. Sci. 120. State and Local Government 

Pol. Sci. 160. International Relations 

Pol. Sci. 221. W. Va. Govt, and Adm. 

Economics 6 

Econ. 51. Principles of Economics 3 

Econ. 52. Principles of Economics 3 

Sociology 6 

Sociol. 1. Introduction to Sociology 3 

Sociol. 104. Social Problems 3 

Geography 6 

Geogr. 7. Introduction to Geography, and/or 3 

Geogr. 8. Human Geography and/or 3 

Geogr. 109. Economic Geography 3 

•Included in the program of General Studies. 
°° Students certifying in West Virginia shall include Hist. 150 among their electives. 
NOTE: The student who expects to qualify for certification in Social Studies is advised to 
take the following courses in the program of General Studies: Hist. 1 and 2; Economics, Sociology, 
and Political Science. 



SPEECH 36 

Required Courses 

Speech 31. Basic Speech Skills 3 

Speech 34. Basic Speech Skills 3 

Speech 120. Group Discussion 3 

Speech 121. Argumentation and Debate 3 

Drama 50. Oral Interpretation 3 

Drama 75. Acting 3 

Drama 100. Stagecraft 3 

Drama 180. Directing or 

Drama 282. Creative Dramatics 3 

SPA 250. Oral Communication Disorders 3 

EDUCATIOX 2S3 



Speech 80. [ntroduction to Broadcasting 3 

Speech 153. Applied Phonetics . . 3 

Speech 1S1. Radio and Television Announcing 3 

° Included in the program of General Requirements. 
••Speech 31 and 34 are for students who qualify for certification in the field of Speech. 
The requirements supersede Speed] 3 and 11 in the program of General Studies. Of the Drama 
Options, Drama ISO is for teachers certifying f or grades 7-12; Drama 282 is for those certifying 
for grades 5-9. 

THE SCIENCES 

BIOLOGICAL AND GENERAL SCIENCE (Comprehensive) 57 

Required Courses 51 

Biol. 1, 2. General Biology 8 

Biol. 103. Plants As Organisms 4 

Biol. 104. Animals As Organisms 

( Physical Education majors will take Zool. 271) 4 

Biol. 121. General Ecology 4 

Biol. 173. Cell Biology 4 

Chem. 11, 12. General Chemistry* 8 

Physics 1, 2. General Physics* 8 

Geol. 1. Physical Geology* 3 

Geol. 2. Physical Geology Lab* 1 

Geol. 3. Historical Geology* 3 

Geol. 4. Historical Geology Lab* 1 

Astron. 106. Descriptive Astronomy 3 

Approved Electives 6 

Biosystematics 3 

Principles of Evolution 3 

History of Biology 3 

Cytology 4 

Plant Ecology 4 

West Virginia's Natural Resources 3 

223. Field Studies of Invertebrates 6 

Ornithology 3 

"Included in the program of General Studies. 

NOTE: A student who wishes to qualify for a specialization in chemistry, physics or bio- 
logical science may omit elements of geology and astronomy, hut will he required to complete a 
second specialization. 

PHYSICS AND GENERAL SCIENCE (Comprehensive) 47-51 

Required Courses 

Physics 1, 2. Introduction to Physics* 

Physics 109, 110. A Problem Course in General 

Physics or 8-12 

Physics 11. General Physics* 
Physics 102. General Physics 

Physics 125, 126. Modern Physics for Engineers 6 

Chem. 11, 12. General Chemistry*' 8 

Geol. 1. Physical Geology* 3 

Geol. 2. Physical Geology Lab. 1 

Geol. 3. Historical Geology 3 

Geol. 4. Historical Geology Lab.* 3 

Astron. 106. Descriptive Astronomy 3 

Biol. 1, 2. Genera] biology 8 

Approved Electives 6 

Physics 113, 1 14. Introductory Electronics 6 

Physics 1 Hi. Photography 3 

284 



Biol. 


161. 


Biol. 


205. 


Biol. 


207. 


Biol. 


215. 


Bot. 


221. 


For. 


140. 


Zool. 


222, 


Zool. 


265. 



Physics 117. Descriptive Meteorology 3 

Physics 221. Optics 3 

"Included in the program of General Studies. 

NOTE: A student who wishes to qualify for a specialization in chemistry, physics or bio- 
logical science may omit elements of geology and astronomy, but will be required to complete a 
second specialization. 

CHEMISTRY A^ND GENERAL SCIENCE (Comprehensive) 46-48 

Required Courses 

Chem. 15, 16. Fundamentals of Chemistry** 8 

Chem. 115. Quantitative Analysis 3 

Chem. 131. Organic Chemistry or 

Chem. 133. Organic Chemistry 3-4 

Chem. 141. Physical Chemistry 4 

Physics 1, 2. Introduction to Physics* 8 

Geol. 1. Physical Geology* 3 

Geol. 2. Physical Geology Laboratory* 1 

Geol. 3. Historical Geology* 3 

Geol. 4. Historical Geology Laboratory* 1 

Astron. 106. Descriptive Astronomy 3 

Biol. 1, 2. General Biology* 8 

Approved Electives 

Chem. 221. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Geol. 151. Structural Geology 3 

Geol. 184. ( Mineralogy) 4 

"Included in the program of General Studies. 

NOTE: A student who wishes to qualify for a specialization in chemistry, physics or bio- 
logical science may omit elements of geology and astronomy, but will be required to complete a 
second specialization. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION* 

No courses in Education except Ed. 100, 102 (IA), 103 (IA), 104 (IA), 105, 
106, 107 (IA), 108 (IA), and 112 (IA) are open to sophomores. The following courses 
are required of teachers for recommendation for a Professional Certificate Grades 
7-12: Ed. 100, 105, 106, 120, 124, 150-170, and enough additional hours chosen from 
the following approved electives to meet the minimum requirements of 21 hours in 
Education: Ed. 109, 150-170 in a second teaching field, 221, 251, 259, 262, 270, 271, 
275, 276, 277, 284, and 285. The following courses are required of teachers for 
recommendation for a Professional Certificate, Grades 1-9: Ed. 100, 105, 106, 141, 
142, 143, 144, 145, and 146. 

100. Orientation and Selection. I, II, S. 1 hr. Open to sophomores and above. 
Acquaints students with selective processes necessary for admission to the 
Division of Education or the student teaching program and assists the teacher 
trainee in self evaluation through counseling and testing. 

102. Hand Woodworking (IA). I. 2 hr. Design and construction of small projects 
suitable for secondary schools involving hand woodworking ^kilK tools, 
materials and processes. Open to lower-division students. 

103. Machine Woodworking (IA). II. 2 hr. Development of skill in use of the 
common power woodworking machines. Open to lower-division students. 

104. Cold Metals (IA). I. 2 hr. Layout, planning and construction in sheet metal 
and ornamental iron. Open to lower-division students. 

°Ed. 100 and Ed. 105 are prerequisite to all other courses in Education. 

EDUCATIOX 



105. Human Growth and Development— Introduction. I, II, S. 3 hr. Open to 
sophomores or above. Emphasis upon competencies in understanding and 
applying principles involved in the growth and development of children and 
youth. 

106. Human Growth and Development— Principles of Learning. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: 

Ed. 100, 105. Continuation of Ed. 105 with special attention to the principles 
of learning. Open to sophomores or above. 

107. General Shop 1 (IA). I. 3 hr. Basic course in the practice and techniques in- 
volved in the areas of printing, bench-metal work, forging, foundry, and 
project planning. General shop organization emphasized. 

108. General Shop 2 (IA). II. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 107 (IA). Continuation of Ed. 107 (IA). 
Emphasis on planning and project construction in electricity, metals, including 
welding (gas and arc), metal lathe turning, spinning, cold forming, and wood 
patternmaking. 

109. History and Philosophy of the Secondary School. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106. 
Significant historical developments giving rise to the modern secondary school; 
the nature and function of the secondary school in an emerging new world 
order; influence on curriculum and instruction. 

110. Maintenance and Construction of Industrial Arts Equipment (IA). I, II, S. 
2 hr. PR: Ed. 102 (IA), 104 (IA), and consent. Study of school shop mainte- 
nance problems and their solution, including the construction of certain types 
of equipment. 

112. Hot Metals (IA). II. 2 hr. Foundry practice, forging, gas and electric welding, 
construction of patterns and jigs. Open to lower-division students. 

115. Student Teaching in Elementary-School Music. I, II. 3 hr. Observation and 
practice of teaching music to pupils in grades 1 through 6. Open to seniors 
who have completed 27 semester hours in music and 7 semester hours in 
Education with a grade-point average of 2.0 (C) in each and an overall grade- 
point average of 2.25. 

120. Principles of Teaching in Secondary Schools. I, II, S. 4 hr. PR: Open only to 
those who qualify for the student teaching block. 

121. Industrial Arts Crafts (IA). I. 2 hr. Construction activities suitable for second- 
ary schools in such media as leather, plastics, and ceramics. 

124. Student Teaching. I, II, S. 4-6 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, and 106. Open only to 
seniors and graduate students, regularly enrolled in the University, who meet 
the following requirements: 

1. Completion of 75 per cent of the hours required in each of two teach- 
ing fields and completion of Ed. 100, 105 and 106, with a minimum grade- 
point average of 2.0 (C) in each teaching field and in Education and a mini- 
mum overall grade-point average of 2.25.* 

2. An applicant for student teaching must submit positive evidence that 
he (or she) meets the requirements of physical condition and emotional sta- 
bility necessary for the performance of the duties of a teacher. Such evidence 
must come from the University Health Service on a form used by the Division 
of Education. 

3. This course must be taken concurrently with Ed. 120 and the appro- 
priate course of Ed. 150-170, unless exceptions have previously been made 
by the Director of Secondary Student Teaching. A period of 3 hours daily 
must be reserved for this and simultaneous courses for purposes of observa- 
tion, discussion, and planning. 

4. Admission is by application made by February 1 of the preceding year 
to the Director of Student Teaching. 

°A11 work taken within the area of a teaching field will be used in the computation of the 
grade-point average for that field regardless of whether the work is required for the teaching 
field. 

286 



5. The student is responsible for maintaining knowledge of his eligibility. 
He should check regularly each semester with his adviser for relevant informa- 
tion. 

6. Students with no teaching experience are expected to take this course 
during the academic year. 

7. Students should expect to carry no courses in addition to the student 
teaching block. 

8. Student teaching will be done in centers throughout the state. 

125. Student Teaching in Secondary-School Music. I, II. 4 hr. PR: Same require- 
ments as Ed. 124 except in hours' credit needed and Music 141, 182, 184. 

127. Material and Methods in Public-School Speech and Hearing Therapy. I, II, S. 

2-4 hr. PR: Consent. Includes experience in Grades 1 to 12. Three semester 
hours of this course may be earned by registering in Speech 276. 

128. Clinical Practices in Public-School Speech and Hearing Therapy. I, II, S. 2-8 

hr. PR: Consent. Includes experience in Grades 1 to 12. This course meets 
the requirements of Speech 277 and 278. 

130. Materials and Methods in Elementary-School Music. I, II. 2 hr. (To be taken 
concurrently with Ed. 115.) 

131. General Electricity 1 (IA). I. 2 hr. Study of basic electrical theory and its 
application in secondary-school teaching. Laboratory work involves the con- 
struction of electrical projects suitable for developing an understanding of 
electrical theory. 

132. General Electricity 2 (IA). II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 131 (IA). Continuation of Ed. 131 
(IA) with an introduction to radio, involving crystals, transistors, and tubes. 

141. Introduction to Elementary Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 100 and 105 
and enrollment in the Division of Education. Introduction to elementary edu- 
cation including observation and participation in public schools. Principles of 
elementary education will be related to principles of learning in Education 
106. Analysis of professional problems and procedures will be an integral part 
of the course. (To be taken concurrently with Ed. 106, 142, and 143.) 

142. Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 
100, 105, and enrollment in the elementary undergraduate program. This 
course covers instructional practices in all phases of the language arts. (To be 
taken concurrently with Ed. 106, 141, and 143.) 

143. Mathematics in the Elementary School. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Six hours of mathe- 
matics, Ed. 100 and 105, and enrollment in the elementary undergraduate 
program. Materials and methods with emphasis on the use of problem situa- 
tions and "discovery" procedures for the development of mathematical ideas 
appropriate for the elementary school. (To be taken concurrentlv with Ed. 
106, 141, and 142.) 

144. Social Studies in the Elementary School. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, 106, 

141, 142, 143, and enrollment in the elementary undergraduate program. 
Study of modern practices in the teaching of social studies. Emphasis on the 
principles and techniques underlying the community-oriented social processes, 
foreign culture and geography, and history are developed. (To be taken con- 
currently with Ed. 145 and 146.) 

145. Science in the Elementary' School. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, 106, 141. 

142, 143, and enrollment in the elementary undergraduate program. Study of 
modern practices in the teaching of science. (To be taken concurrentlv with 
Ed. 144 and 146.) 

146. Student Teaching in the Elementary School. I, II. 6 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, 
106, 141, 142, 143 and enrollment in the elementary education undergraduate 

EDUCATIOX 287 



program: a minimum grade-point average of 2.25 overall; a minimum grade- 
point average of 2.0 (1) in the subject-specialization, three-fourths of which 
must be completed, and (2) in Education courses; and senior standing. An 
applicant for student teaching must submit positive evidence that he or she 
meets the requirements of physical condition and emotional stability necessary 
for the performance of the duties of a teacher. Ed. 144 and 145 must be taken 
concurrently with student teaching. Admission is by application made prior to 
February 1 of the preceding year to the Director of Student Teaching. Stu- 
dents should expect to carry no courses in addition to the student teaching 
block of Education 144, 145, and 146. Student teaching will be done in 
selected centers throughout the state. 

150-170. Materials and Methods of High-School Teaching. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Con- 
sent. Special methods in the various secondary-school teaching fields. For 
West Virginia certification these courses are an integral part of Ed. 124. 

The various sections of this course follow: 
150. Science. 2 hr. 

152. Physical Education. 2 hr. 

153. Foreign Languages. 2 hr. 
155. Library Science. 2 hr. 

160. Vocational Agriculture. 3 hr. 

161. English and Speech. 2 hr. 

163. Home Economics. 2 hr. 

164. Industrial Arts. 2 hr. 

165. Mathematics. 2 hr. 

167. Social Studies. 2 hi. 

168. Art. 2 hr. 

169. Music. 2 hr. 

170. Commerce. 2 hr. 

173. Technical Drawing 1 (IA). I. 2 hr. Fundamentals of mechanical drawing with 
emphasis on establishment of good techniques, nomenclature, conventions, 
and correct applications. 

174. Technical Drawing 2 (IA). II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 173 (IA). Continuation of Ed. 
173 (IA). Detail and assembly drawing, sketching, tracings, and methods of 
duplication. 

180. Industrial Arts Graphics (IA). I. 2 hr. Familiarization with methods of graphic 
reproduction including linoleum block, letterpress, silk screen, binding, and 
offset press. 

181. Materials and Methods of Industry. I. 2 hr. Introduction of related information 
in secondary school industrial arts laboratories relative to mass production, 
automation, and modern technology. Experiments with industrial products. 

194. Organization of Industrial Arts. II. 2 hr. Comparative analysis of the objec- 
tives of general and industrial arts education; industrial arts content; study 
of the problems involved in organizing and administering industrial arts 
courses in unit and general shops. 

200. Early Childhood Education. SII. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 105, 106, Ed. 100, 105, 106, 
III. An examination of the role thai early childhood education plays in the 
development of the child. Attention is given to the scope, content, and nature 
of programs lor young children as well as developing the knowledge, skills, 
;iikI attitudes necessary for working in such programs. Students will be given 
opportunities to observe and participate in early childhood programs and to 
engage in research at this level. 

201. Early Childhood Education. SII. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 105, 100, Ed. 100, 105, 100, 
111. 200. Continuation of Ed. 200. 



'Si c footnote on page 280. 



288 



204. Advanced Woodworking, Construction, and Finishing (IA). II, S. 3 hr. PR: 

Ed. 102 (IA), 103 (IA), or equiv. Selection of advanced projects, analysis of 
construction, planning, and finishing, application of machine tools. 

221. Audio-Visual Resources for Instruction. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106. Sur- 
vey of the many types of materials available for teaching. Multisensory tech- 
niques, sources of materials, and practical classroom utilization are considered. 
One hour laboratory period per week is arranged. 

223. Student Teaching Clinical Experience in Elementary or Secondary Education. 

I, II, S. 2-4 hr. PR: Consent. Advanced course in student teaching, stressing 
clinical procedures in classroom learning problems. 

238. Design in Industrial Education (IA). I, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Industrial edu- 
cation design; architectural drawing and model building. Emphasis on appli- 
cation of design components at the secondary school level. 

240-250. These courses are designed to prepare versatile teachers of industrial arts 
and to meet State certification requirements. The abbreviated introduction to 
specific crafts through these courses is intended to provide broad rather than 
specialized experience and to prepare the teacher to teach the fundamentals 
of crafts rather than to attain vocational competence. Prospective teachers 
should elect, from these courses, those which will supplement their previous 
training in organizing and directing the industrial arts program. 

240. Art Metal and Jewelry (IA). I, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 104 (IA) or equiv. Creative 
design and construction of art metal and jewelry involving the utilization of 
sheet, bar, and wire stock. Development of units suitable for the secondary 
school level is stressed. 

242. Upholstery and Finishing (IA). I, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 102 (IA), 103 (IA) or equiv., 
and consent. Design and construction of upholstery units, reupholstery, finish- 
ing and refinishing. Construction of teaching units in these areas. 

243. Advanced Ceramics (IA). II. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 121 (IA) or consent. Design in 
ceramics, construction of projects involving mold work; potter's wheel, and 
hand form methods. Experimentation with glazes including glaze composition. 
Development of suitable teaching aids involving ceramics. 

244. Advanced Industrial Arts Crafts (IA). II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 121 (IA). Experi- 
ments with crafts media in depth in the areas of plastics and leather. De- 
velopment of suitable teaching units involving crafts materials. 

246. Advanced Industrial Arts Graphics (IA). II, S. 3 hr. PR: Ed. 180 (IA) or equiv. 
Concentration in depth in one or more of the graphic arts media. Emphasis 
on offset methods of reproduction. 

248. Advanced Electricity (IA). II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 131 (IA) or equiv. Study of 
the technical phases of electricity with emphasis on planning shop courses, 
shop equipment and layout, and development of industrial aids. 

249. Sheet Metal Pattern Development (IA). II, S. 3 hr. Layout problems involving 
parallel, radial, and triangulation methods. Construction of instructional units 
utilizing these principles. 

250. Industrial Arts in Special Education (IA). II, S. 3 hr. Experimentation with 
industrial arts crafts suitable for instruction in special education classes. Dis- 
cussion of factors involved in selection and manipulation of Mich media as 
leather, plastics, ceramics, wood, and metal. 

251. Production of Audio-Visual Materials. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 221. Techniques 
of making audio-visual materials for use in teaching and school public rela- 
tions programs are demonstrated. Individual projects of planning and produc- 
ing materials are carried out by the student. 



EDUCMIOS 289 



259. The Music Education Program. S. 3 hr. PR or parallel: Ed. 124 or consent. 
Organization and administration of the complete Music Education program 
for grades 1-12. 

262. Vocational Home Economics in Secondary Schools. II. 3 hr. PR or parallel: 
Ed. 120, 124, 163; 25 hr. in Home Economics. Primarily for seniors and 
teachers of home economics. 

270. Special Problems and Workshops. I, II, S. 2-4 hr. PR: 14 hr. in Education. 
To take care of credits for special workshops and short intensive unit courses 
on methods, supervision, and other special topics. Maximum of 8 semester 
hours may be applied toward the Master's degree, of which no more than 6 
semester hours will be in Extension. 

271. Educational Measurement. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Background for edu- 
cational measurement, the nature of evaluation, measuring and predicting 
pupil progress. Statistics include measures of central tendency, percentiles, 
variability, and simple correlation. First course in statistics and research. 

272. Internship in Industrial Arts Therapy (IA). I, II, S. 8 hr. Internship in a 
clinical setting providing individualized instruction in the teaching techniques 
of industrial arts and therapeutic practices in rehabilitation of the handi- 
capped. 

274. Workshop: Economic Education. S. 3 hr. Workshop for principals, teachers, 
and supervisors with emphasis on the economic structure of our society and 
methods of integrating economics into the school program. Sponsored jointly 
by the College of Human Resources and Education and the College of Com- 
merce. 

275. Curriculum Principles and Patterns in General Education. II. 2 hi. PR: 6 hr. 

in undergraduate Education and senior rank. Major emphasis on principles, 
philosophy, and concepts of general education in secondary schools; means 
and ends in general education; core, subject matter, integrated studies, broad 
fields, activity. 

276. Teaching Young, Adult Farmer, and Off-Farm Agricultural Occupations 
Classes. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 105, 106, or consent. Participation in conducting 
young, adult farmers, and off-farm agricultural occupations classes and school- 
community food preservation center; organization, course of study, method 
teaching, and supervision of the classes, young farmers' associations, adult 
farmers' organizations in classes. 

277. Organizing and Directing Supervised Farming Occupational Experience Pro- 
grams. I, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 160 or consent. Planning programs of supervised 
farming and supervised occupational experience, supervising and evaluating 
such programs for day students, young, adult farmers, and off -farm agricul- 
tural occupations classes and groups. 

284. Pupil-Personnel Administration. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, 106. Pupil 
accounting, guidance, extracurricular activities, and control. Open only to 
senior students and graduates. 

285. The Junior High School. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Ed. 100, 105, 106, and consent De- 
veloping philosophy, program, and practices of the junior high school. 



Secretarial Studies 

51. Business Communications. II. 3 hr. PR: 6 hr. PR: English composition and 
ability to type. 

61. Typewriting. 1. - hr. For students in the Division ol Education with a Com- 
merce teaching field, or consent. 

62. Typewriting. I, II. 2 hr. PR: See. Studies 01 or equiv. For students in the 
Division of Education with a Commerce teaching Held, or consent. 



290 



125. Shorthand. I. 4 hr. For students in the Division of Education with a Com- 
merce teaching field, or consent. 

126. Shorthand. II. 4 hr. PR: Sec. Studies 125 or equiv. For students in the Divi- 
sion of Education with a Commerce teaching field, or consent. 

131. Secretarial Training and Office Practice. I. 3 hr. PR: Ability to type. For stu- 
dents in the Division of Education with a Commerce teaching field, or con- 
sent. 

132. Transcription. II. 2 hr. For students in the Division of Education with a Com- 
merce teaching field, or consent. 



THE DIVISION OF FAMILY RESOURCES 

( formerly Home Economics ) 

The Division of Family Resources provides a program for women and men interested 
in obtaining undergraduate professional preparation in the broad field of home 
economics. The structure of the courses in the Division provides students the oppor- 
tunity to study the environment of man, particularly his food, clothing and shelter, 
and the relationship of man to that environment. The focus of the program is upon 
human interaction and its consequences within the framework of the social institution 
of the family. 

Students enroll in the Division who are interested in the numerous career 
opportunities in any of these areas: 

—child development, nursery education, early childhood education, 
family life education, child welfare, family service occupations, and 
other community service oriented fields. 

—management and effective use of family financial and human re- 
sources; for example, as consumer education counselors. 

—design and use of dwellings, interior design, and design and use of 
products, furnishings, and equipment for the home. 

—the textile and fiber industry, fashion, and fashion merchandising. 

—food production, processing, planning and service, particularly in the 
administration and organization of high volume food services. 

—human nutrition, nutrition education, and dietetics. 

—journalism, particularly in the areas of food, fashion, and home service. 

—teaching in elementary, junior high school, or secondary school pro- 
grams in family life education, foods and nutrition, clothing and textiles, 
and consumer education. 

—large industrial organizations whose major products are food, house- 
hold equipment or educational information and service directed to- 
ward the consumer. 

Students who prepare for these career opportunities by enrolling in the Divi- 
sion of Family Resources may work with children, adolescents, adults or total family 
units; in schools, small businesses or large corporations, public utility companies and 
various government organizations; in their own community, in any part of the United 
States, or in a foreign country. The demand has never been greater for the kind of 
professional services that the home economist has to offer. 

The program of the Division provides not only for lectures, but also for a 
variety of kinds of laboratory experiences and selected field work in different settings. 

FAMILY RESOURCES 291 



The need to educate competent and informed citizens and family members has 
never been more urgent than it presently is. In addition to the professional prepara- 
tion of students, the program of the Division regularly attracts a large number of 
students from various departments in the University who enroll in courses for the 
purpose of increasing the scope of their knowledge in family relations and child de- 
velopment, foods and nutrition, textiles and clothing, housing and design, and family 
economics and management. The field of home economics has the longest tradition of 
any field for interest in the education of competent and informed consumers and 
family members. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

Students have the choice of seven options toward a degree in home economics: 
social science emphasis, physical science emphasis, art emphasis, journalism emphasis, 
dietetics emphasis, home economics education, or general emphasis. The Bachelor of 
Science degree is granted. Students may also pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree with 
a major in home economics by fulfilling the requirements of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Minimum hours in Family Resources 36 

Total hours in other areas 80 

Electives 12 

Grand Total 1 28 

Required Courses 

I. University Core Curriculum Hi. 

English Composition 6 

Physical Education 4 

Core Groups A, B, and C 36 

Total 46 

II. Family Resources Professional Core 

1. Child Development and Family Relations 144 (CDFR 114) 3 

2. Textiles and Clothing 22 (TC 2) or 122 (102) . 3 

3. Nutrition 71 (FN 1) or Nutrition 175 (FN 135) 3 

4. Home Management and Family Economics 161 (HMFE 210) 
or Home Management and Family Economics 165 

(HMFE 230) 3 

5. Housing and Design 31 ( HD 3) 3 

Total 15 

111. Options 

a. Social Science Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in social science areas 12 

2. Additional courses in child development and family re- 
lations, home management and family economics areas ... II 

3. Electives 41 

Total 67 



292 



Physical Science Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in physical sciences, work in at least 
two fields 12 

a. Biology, bacteriology, zoology, genetics 

b. Chemistry 

c. Mathematics, statistics, physics 

2. Additional courses in foods and nutrition 15 

3. Speech 3 

4. Electives 37 

Total 67 

Art Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in at least two of the following areas: 21 

a. Accounting, marketing, journalism 

b. Art 

c. Psychology, sociology, history 

2. Additional courses in textiles and clothing, housing and 
design areas 15 

3. Speech 3 

4. Electives 28 

Total 67 

Journalism Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in Family Resources 15 

2. Journalism courses 21 

3. Additional courses from University Core B 6 

4. Family Resources electives 6 

5. General electives 19 

Total 67 

Dietetics Emphasis 

1. Additional courses in physical sciences 16 

2. Additional courses in foods and institution administration 
and nutrition 29 

3. Accounting 51, Psychology 101, Speech 3, and 

Education 106 12 

4. Electives 10 

Total 67 

Home Economics Education (Teaching Emphasis)— Those stu- 
dents wishing to obtain a teaching certificate in vocational 
home economics must take certain specified courses under the 
University Core Program and must have at least 8 hours in 
each of the five subject matter areas in the Division. ( Consult 
the Division of Education section for specific details.) 

General Emphasis 

1. One additional 3-hour course in each area plus 6 hours of 
electives in home economics 21 

2. Electives 46 

Total 67 



FAMILY RESOURCES 293 



LABORATORY FEES 

A nonrefundable fee is required of all students who take the following lab- 
oratory courses in Family Resources: 

Course Per Semester 

Foods and Institution Administration 55 $ 5.00 

Foods and Institution Administration 151 ....... 10.00 

Foods and Institution Administration 255 5.00 

Home Management and Family Economics 160 5.00 

Home Management and Family Economics 165 5.00 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
HEED 

211. Evaluation in Home Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: 30 hr. of Home Economics, 7 hr. 
of Education or consent. Experience in devising, selecting, and using a variety 
of techniques for evaluating progress toward cognitive, affective, and psycho- 
motor objectives in home economics. Offered alternate odd years. 

212. Adult Education in Home Economics. I. 3 hr. PR: 30 hr. of Home Economics 
and 7 hr. of Education or consent. A study of adult education as that part of 
the local home economics program which contributes to meeting needs of 
people for continuing education throughout the various life stages. Attention 
given to organization of classes and to selection of content, methods, and 
materials. Offered alternate even years. 



TEXTILES AND CLOTHING 
TC 

22. Principles of Clothing Construction. I, II. 3 hr. (Three 2-hr. periods per week). 
Basic principles of clothing construction including pattern alteration and fit- 
ting. 

27. Textiles for Consumers. I, II. 3 hr. (2 lee, 1 lab.). Presents a survey of tra- 
ditional background information and the new developments in the textile field. 
Special emphasis is given to the development of raw materials into finished 
consumers' goods. 

121. Tailoring. I, II. 3 hr. PR: TC 22, 27. Tailoring of suits and coats. Emphasis 
placed on professional techniques, advanced fitting and construction of gar- 
ments. Second garment constructed by fast method techniques. 

122. Clothing for the Family. I. 3 hr. (3 lee). Clothing for the family in relation to 
social, psychological, and economic factors including a study of the clothing 
industry, trends, and cultural significance. Field trip included. 

123. Costume Design. II. 3 hr. PR: TC 22, 27. Techniques of figure and fashion 
drawing. Designing for individuals of various types and ages. Some history of 
costume included. 

124. Advanced Clothing Construction. I. 3 hr. PR: TC 123 or consent. Offers 
opportunity for creative expression and for understanding of pattern design 
through handling of fabrics on dress form. Costumes are designed, draped 
and constructed. 

127. Advanced Textiles. I. 3 hr. PR: TC 27. Comparative characteristics of all tex- 
tile fibers are presented. Physical and chemical properties are explained with 
reference to fiber morphology and/or manufacturing processes. Textile fiber 
products legislation is reviewed. 

2f)4 



HOUSING AND DESIGN 
HD 

31. Introduction to Design. I, II. 3 hr. The use of the design elements and the 
application of design principles to stimulate imagination and creative ability 
and to develop discriminating judgment in selection and arrangement of ma- 
terials used for the individual and the home. 

33. Housing Design. I, II. 3 hr. PR: HD 31 or consent. Housing and home plan- 
ning as they relate to family living. Selection, arrangement, and use of the 
interior and exterior space for activities carried on, in, and around the homo. 

133. Interior Design I. I. 3 hr. PR: HD 33 or consent. The aesthetic and practical 
aspects of coordinating the furnishings, background, accessories, lighting, and 
space of a house for family living. 

233. Interior Design II. II. 3 hr. PR: HD 33, 133 or consent. Technical and design 
information necessary to comprehend and function within the contemporary 
home furnishings market. 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT; FAMILY RELATIONS 
CDFR 

141. Child Development I. I. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or 3 or Educ. 105 or consent. An 
introduction to major theories of human development. Contributions of Freud, 
Rank, Erikson, Piaget, Sears, etc. will be studied. Laboratory experience as 
observation in laboratory child development center. 

142. Child Development II. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Psych. 1 or Ed. 105 or consent. (2 lee. 
and one 2-hr. lab. arranged.) Principles of development during childhood in- 
cluding physical, psychological, and social factors affecting behavior. Obser- 
vation and participation in the University Nursery School. 

144. Introduction to Marriage and the Family. I, II. 3 hr. Introductory course in the 
study of marriage and the family. Attention is placed particularly on mate 
selection, the interplay of social roles in family relations, and problems of 
decision-making and adjustment arising out of the demands of the contempo- 
rary social setting. 

145. Infant Development. I. 3 hr. Developmental characteristics and issues during 
the prenatal period and the first eighteen months with implications for guid- 
ance and care. 

146. Adolescent Development. I, II. 3 hr. An investigation of the adolescent in 
contemporary American culture, including normative physical, social, and 
personality development; and relationships within various typical social set- 
tings (e.g., family, school, community, peer group). 

241. Cognitive Development of the Child. I. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 141 and 142 or con- 
sent. A normative survey of logical thought development from infancy to 
adolescence. Emphasis is directed toward the growth of spatio-temporal, 
quantity-numerical, spatial-geometric, and infralogical concepts and their re- 
lationship to basic sensory-perceptual functioning during the 2-year to 12- 
year-old age interval. 

242. Socio-Emotional Development of the Child. II. 3 hr. A study and examination 
of contemporary theory and research into various facets of the socialization 
process and the development of attitudes in the child. 

244. Family and Individual in Community. I. 3 hr. PR: One course in the family, 
or sociology, or consent. Social psychological analysis of the individual in the 
family and in other social systems. Involves the study of role relationships, 
community processes and attitudes and values as they affect the behavior of 
the individual. 

FAMILY RESOURCES 295 



245. Family Development. I. II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 144 or consent. A course designed 
to increase knowledge and understanding of comparative family patterns 
through the use of cross-cultural and historical materials. Intensive study of 
family development in contemporary United States with special attention to 
social elass differences and the use of the life cycle and developmental task 
concepts as analytic tools. 

247. Comparative Study of the Family. II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 144 or consent. The 
comparative method as a framework for family analysis. The family as both an 
independent and dependent variable in social change in relation to other 
social systems. Modal and unique patterns of structure and functioning. 
Alternative methods for achieving similar cultural objectives. Converging 
patterns in the contemporary world setting. 

248. Theories of Child Development. II. 3 hr. PR: CDFR 141, 142, or consent. An 
examination of the major theoretical conceptions of child development. The 
work of Werner, Piaget, Lewin, Freud, and the American learning theorists 
will be covered. 



FOODS; INSTITUTION ADMINISTRATION 
FIA 

55. Food Principles and Practices. I, II. 3 hr. PR: 8 hr. of a laboratory science. 
(2 lee, 1 lab.). Basic principles of food selection, care and preparation. Em- 
phasis is placed on the chemical and physical properties of foods and reactions 
which occur during processing. 

151. Meal Management. I, II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 55 or consent. (1 lee, 3-hr. lab.). 
Selection and purchase of foods; planning, preparing, and serving meals with 
emphasis on time, energy, and money management. 

153. Quantity Cookery. II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 151. Application of principles to prepara- 
tion of food in large quantities. Use of standardized formulae, calculation of 
(usts, and use of institution equipment. Field trip included. Offered alternate 
odd years. 

154. Institution Food Procurement. I. 3 hr. PR: FIA 153. Producing areas, distribu- 
tion of food products, specifications, storage, and food practices in quantity 
buying. Observation in local wholesale markets, warehouses, and storage units. 
Offered in alternate odd years. Tour of market facilities in Pittsburgh area 
required. 

158. Institution Organization and Management. II. 3 hr PR: FIA 153. Principles of 
organization and management of food service. Field trip included. Offered 
alternate even years. 

255. Experimental Foods. II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 55, Chem. 131, or consent. (1 hr. lee, 
!\\<> 2-hr. labs.). The study and experimentation with factors involved in food 
processing under various conditions. Offered alternate odd years. 

258. Laboratory Practice in Institution Management. I, II. 3 hr. PR: FIA 158 and 
consent. Experience under supervision in planning, preparing and serving food 
in an institution. Selection of place and type of experience to be determined 

1)\ needs ol students. 



HOME MANAGEMENT; FAMILY ECONOMICS 

HMFE 

L60. Communication of Consumer Information. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Minimum of 3 hr. 
in each "! Four areas ol home economics, or consent, Techniques ol communi- 
cating ideas and information relative to goods and services available to the 
consumer. Emphasis upon demonstration techniques. 

296 



161. Family Economics. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Senior or graduate standing. Management 
of the family's money resources. Consideration of the economic problems of 
families, of planned spending and saving, and of the role of the consumer. 

165. Home Management: Principles, and Applications. I, II. 3 hr. PR: Upper- 
division standing. Study and application of management in a variety of situa- 
tions faced by the family with opportunity to integrate knowledge from other 
courses. 

166. Home Management: Residence Laboratory. I, II. 1-3 hr. PR: HMFE 165. Resi- 
dence laboratory in home management principles and practices. 

167. Household Equipment. I, II. 3 hr. Selection, arrangement, use and care of 
equipment for various situations and for different income levels. Lecture, 
laboratory, and discussion. 

261. Consumer Economics. II. 3 hr. PR: Econ. 51, HMFE 161, or consent. Course 
designed to help students understand the role of consumer in our economy. 
Involves the study of research methods and techniques being used to identify, 
understand, and solve consumer problems. 



NUTRITION 
NTR 

71. Introduction to Nutrition. I, II. 3 hr. Essentials of adequate diet; applications 
are made with particular reference to needs of college students. 

175. Food and People. I. 3 hr. The cultural, social, ethnic, and economic problems 
involved in feeding families. 

271. Human Nutrition. I. 3 hr. PR: NTR 71, biochemistry, physiology. The role of 
food nutrients in the physiological and biochemical processes of the body; 
nutritional needs of healthy individuals under ordinary conditions and in 
periods of physiologic stress. Offered alternate even years. 

273. Family and Community Nutrition. II. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Special emphasis is 
given to nutritional status of the individual and family in the community. Stu- 
dents study nutritional problems and work toward their solutions through 
fieldwork. 

274. Diet Therapy. II. 3 hr. PR: NTR 271, Zool. 271. Adaptations of normal diet 
for diseases whose prevention or treatment is largely influenced by diet. 
Offered in alternate odd years. 



FAMILY RESOURCES 
FR 

281. Seminar in Home Economics Education. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. 
A review and discussion of home economics education at secondary, college, 
and adult levels. Emphasis on current research and trends in selected areas. 
Offered alternate odd years. 

282. Seminar in Clothing or Textiles. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination of significant contemporary issues in the area of clothing or tex- 
tiles. 

283. Seminar in Housing or Design. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination of significant contemporary issues in the area of housing or design. 

284. Seminar in Child Development. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical 
examination of significant contemporary issues in the area of child develop- 
ment. 

FAMILY RESOURCES 297 



285. Seminar in Foods and/or Institution Administration. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., 
max., 9 hr. Critical examination of significant contemporary issues in the area 
of foods and/or institution administration. 

286. Seminar in Home Management or Family Economics. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., 
max., 9 hr. Critical examination of significant contemporary issues in the area 
of home management or family economics. 

287. Seminar in Nutrition. I, II, S. 1-4 hr. per sem., max., 9 hr. Critical examination 
of significant contemporary issues in the area of nutrition. 



THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK 



The Division of Social Work provides an undergraduate curriculum designed 
to provide the student with a basic understanding of social welfare as a system of 
social institutions which has been developed to meet human needs. 

Contemporary American social welfare programs are integrally related to our 
history and current social and political changes. Welfare programs are of such sig- 
nificance that every educated citizen should have some knowledge of their origins, 
philosophy, and structure. This basic knowledge is offered in a group of 200-level 
courses which have the following specific objectives: 

1. To assist the student to understand social welfare as a system of social in- 
stitutions in a context of social change and changing values in a democratic society. 

2. To assist the student in the development of a capacity for critical assess- 
ment of the meaning of important social welfare policies and programs for human 
well-being in the United States and elsewhere. 

3. To assist the student in the integration of other knowledge, drawn from 
his academic studies and life experiences, into a personal point of view regarding the 
rights and responsibilities of the individual in American society. 

4. To assist students to gain a general, non-specialized, understanding of the 
structure and functions of social work as a professional service. 

The 200-level courses may be offered as a social work option in the sociology 
major; or as a minor in conjunction with any major offered toward the Bachelor of 
Arts degree. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

212. Introduction to Social Welfare. I. 3 hr. A general introduction to social wel- 
fare in the United States; history, philosophy, programs and problems; social 
welfare as a social institution; the American way in welfare. The emphasis is 
on what the citizen needs to know about welfare problems and solutions. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 

213. The Field of Social Work. II. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 212. A critical analysis of theory 
and practice in major areas of social work, including public- assistance, the 
can- of dependent children, mental health and services for the aged. Open to 
juniors and seniors. 

215. The Profession of Social Work. I. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 212 and 213. Open to seniors 
and on consent ol instructor. A supervised field experience program involving 
a weekly placement in a local community agency. 



298 



COURSES FOR EMPLOYED WORKERS 

The Division of Social Work offers a series of 200-level courses which are de- 
signed to meet the needs of men and women employed in health, education, and 
welfare agencies. Such courses are given both on campus and in extension. 

230. Public Welfare. 3 hr. An introduction to the history, philosophy and structure 
of public welfare, including public assistance and programs for the aged, sur- 
vivors and disability insurance; historical development, administrative struc- 
tures, perspectives. 

240. Child Welfare. 3 hr. The physical, social and psychological needs of children; 
services provided by public and private agencies to parents and to children 
who need protection, assistance, foster care, adoption, or services in their 
own homes; historical background. 

250. Introduction to Social Casework I. 3 hr. The psychology of client and case- 
worker and the general character of casework help. Lecture, discussion, and 
analysis of selected case materials. 

251. Introduction to Social Casework II. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 250 or equiv. Further 
study in the general character of casework help. Case analyses, lectures, and 
class discussion of casework method. 

260. Introduction to Growth and Behavior I. 3 hr. Study of man as a psychological, 
biological entity. Structure and dynamics of personality development. Models 
of personality. 

261. Introduction to Growth and Behavior II. 3 hr. PR: S.W. 260 or equiv. Further 
study of the dynamics of personality growth and behavior. Special considera- 
tion of deviant development and behavior. 



SOCIAL WORK 299 



The School of Journalism 



To be a journalist in the twentieth century is to be like Caesar's wife— much is asked 
and much is given. In fact, some would say that to be a journalist today is to be 
Caesar himself. 

The responsibilities and power of the men who control the mass media in our 
society are greater today than ever before. 

Editors, producers, advertising executives, and public relations men make many 
decisions every day that directly affect the man in the street. They are the people 
who provide the information, interpretation and opinion that can move governments. 
They are the people who play a major role in deciding how you'll vote, what brand 
of toothpaste you use, and how you view the major institutions of our society. 

The business of the School of Journalism at West Virginia University is to 
educate students to become these communicators of tomorrow. Right now, many of 
the more than 800 graduates of the School are using the broad education and train- 
ing they received to revolutionize the world of communications. 

WVU graduates are filming the important news events in Europe and Africa. 
They are covering the seething unrest of the urban ghetto for Time. The) are man- 
aging huge accounts in agencies like J. Walter Thompson and Carl Byoir and 
Associates in New York. They are directing the public relations programs of indus- 
trial giants such as Fairchild Camera. 

And they are university professors, businessmen, army officers, school prin- 
cipals, and housewives. 

Most are concerned and informed citizens— the product of a liberal arts back- 
ground as well as an intense professional preparation. 



HISTORY 

The more than 300 students currently enrolled in the School of Journalism arc 
the legacy of a program that stretches back as far as 1915, when a two-hour course 
in news writing was first offered in the Department of English. 

By 1927 West Virginia had taken a position of leadership in journalism edu- 
cation by establishing a full professional curriculum in a separate department of 
journalism. The department became a School of Journalism with an administrative 
status similar to that of other schools and colleges within WVU in 1939. It was then 
one of only six journalism schools in the United States to achieve this independent 
status. 

A great deal has happened to journalism in the fifty-five years since West 
Virginia instituted that first course in news writing. 

The study of journalism— once limited to vocational training of newspaper re- 
porters— has become much more. It is now aimed at the whole gamut ol ways in 
which man communicates with his fellow man. 

Thai education is first the study of literature, economics, political s< i< nee, psy- 
chology, sociology, the natural sciences, and historj and the huge range of subjects 
which must be communicated. And second, it is the study of the manner and 
methods oi communicating these subjects most effectively. 

A journalism education today at West Virginia University involves more than 
learning how to write and edit news stories or broadcast documentaries or prepare 

300 



creative advertisements. It involves the study of substantive issues that will need to 
be communicated in the next fifty years as well as that which has already occurred. 

When a student has grasped the fundamentals of the liberal arts tradition, he 
must acquire more than the ability to communicate within that substantive frame- 
work. He must have acquired the ethical awareness that is demanded by the pro- 
fession—his work has an impact far beyond that of most occupations. And it should 
require standards of integrity and fairness far beyond even those practiced by the 
media today. 

A successful public relations man or advertising executive must know where 
ethical advocacy of a product ends and hucksterism begins. The photo-joura - i 
the editor must know where the presentation of fact ends and fabrication begins. It 
is in this realm, as well as that of substantive course work, that a faculty of high 
quality plays a major role. 



FACULTY 

The quality of any school depends heavily on the quality of its faculty. 

When you enroll in the School of Journalism, you are guided by a faculty of 
ten full-time professors and six part-time assistant professors who represent more 
than 300 years of cumulative journalistic experience. 

It is a faculty which represents the diversity of the School itself. The back- 
grounds and education of the teaching staff include professional experience with 
major magazines, newspapers, public relations firms and advertising agencies. 

A communications faculty must have a deep commitment to scholarly achieve- 
ment. Many faculty members have earned distinction in the learned societies in their 
fields. 

A number of the professors have published research products in scholarly 
journals such as the Columbia Journalism Review, Journalism Quarterly and Journal- 
ism Educator. 

Though committed to scholarly attainment, the faculty places even more 
emphasis on its most important function: teaching. Student-faculty rapport is excel- 
lent and virtually all professors maintain an open-door policy— they are available to 
their students at almost any time. 

At a time when some students are saying they can't trust anyone under 30, 
the School has a number of faculty members under that arbitrary cut-off. And those 
over it have earned the respect of their students through their dedication and pro- 
fessional and scholarly attainment, if not their willingness to give time and individual 
attention to their students. 

The combination of youthful vitality and years of experience is the foundation 
of a strong faculty. All of the professors have at least master's degrees and several 
have doctorates. 



PRACTICAL OPPORTUNITIES 

About 1:30 a.m., November 6, 1968, a group of weary reporters and editors 
sat around their newsroom desks and discussed the outcome of the presidential elec- 
tion. 

The students had begun reporting the election many months before and fol- 
lowed it through the early primaries, the conventions and finally the election itself. 

The students were part of the staff of the Daily Athenaeum, the University 
newspaper run by the School of Journalism. 

JOURNALISM 301 



They didn't cover the election from an armchair— reporters were sent to cam- 
paign appearances to see candidates and get the feel of the election story. 

And they were there for the action: they saw the violence in Chicago at the 
Democratic convention; they were there as hundreds of hecklers disrupted a George 
Wallace speech in Pittsburgh. 

It was all part of a philosophy of education at West Virginia University that 
sets the School apart from many other institutions. 

The news that's covered affects the readers of the Daily Athenaeum and, un- 
like most student papers, Athenaeum reporters often go where that news is rather 
than waiting for the news to come to them. And they learn in the process. 

Although the faculty places a major emphasis on theory and substance in the 
courses offered, the Athenaeum is one of many opportunities to try out what is 
learned in the classroom. 

The paper is produced as a laboratory- newspaper by advanced students who 
write, edit, and sell advertising for it. In addition, it is one of the few college news- 
papers in the country whose production is largely dependent upon journalism stu- 
dents. 

The Athenaeum appears Tuesday through Friday and is put out by students 
who take one day-long laboratory a week. 

The University and the community are covered by student reporters who 
emphasize in-depth, interpretive writing in addition to spot news. Students edit local 
reporters' copy and prepare state, national, and international wire copy from Associ- 
ated Press and United Press International. 

Advanced students in photo-journalism may receive practical experience as 
photographers for the Daily Athenaeum and as local stringers for Associated Press. 

Advertising majors may elect to solicit and service advertising accounts for the 
paper and become involved in its business management. 

The production lab of the Athenaeum is one of the most advanced in the 
country. It utilizes an IBM MT-SC computer— a cold-type composing unit— to set 
type for the offset paper. 

Some students also work on the daily newspapers and radio stations in Mor- 
gantown as well as for the University news services. 

The School has received grants totaling $7,000 from Reader's Digest which 
enable students to obtain practical experience in reporting news events in West 
Virginia and surrounding states. 

The School also operates an internship program which places superior stu- 
dents in jobs with major newspapers, magazines, radio stations, television stations. 
and industries for 10 to 12 weeks during the summer. 

The faculty also recognizes the great importance of providing broadcast 
opportunities for students preparing for careers in radio and television. 

The emphasis on broadcasting and the electronic media is growing rapidly. 
With the University's educational television station, WWVU-TV, some students will 
be able to work part-time to get practical experience in this medium. 

It will involve mastering the principles of motion picture photography, in- 
cluding documentary production and basic film editing. Students in radio courses are 
responsible for gathering and writing news for news programs. 

I' K (1 Friendly, former president of CBS News and now a journalism professor 
at Columbia University, has said thai television is making so much money doing its 
worst that it can't afford to do its best. 

One of the purposes of the broadcast program at WVU will be to set, in 
some small way, a standard of quality by which commercial networks can be judged. 

While 1 1 1 < station will devote much of its programming to education, it will 
provide excellent opportunities for the Walter Cronkites of tomorrow to learn their 
field. 
302 



JOURNALISM ORGANIZATIONS 

Students usually find that a large part of their learning doesn't come from a 
classroom lecture or an assignment. It comes instead from the challenge and intel- 
lectual stimulation provided by fellow stulents. 

There are a number of organizations affiliated with the School which provide 
the opportunity not only for honor and recognition, but also for fellowship and edu- 
cation. They are: 

Alpha Delta Sigma, professional advertising fraternity. 

Public Relations Sttident Society of America, national public relations pro- 
fessional organization. 

Kappa Tau Alpha, national scholastic honorary for students with exceptional 
academic records in journalism. 

Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic society for men. 

Theta Sigma Phi, professional journalism honorary for women. 

Gamma Alpha Chi, women's professional advertising fraternity. 



JOB PLACEMENT 

The School makes every effort possible to assist its graduates in finding de- 
sirable positions. It maintains a Job Placement Register which assists current and 
past graduates in finding jobs in the communications industries. 

Representatives of newspapers, magazines, broadcast and advertising media 
visit the campus each year to interview seniors. 



FACULTY 

Quintus C. Wilson, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Journalism and Professor of Jour- 
nalism. 
Gerald W. Ash, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Paul A. Atkins, M.A., Associate Professor of Journalism. 
Francis L. Blake, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Donovan H. Bond, M.A., Professor of Journalism. 
Harry W. Ernst, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Richard L. Hopkins, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Hunter P. McCartney, Ph.D., Professor of Journalism. 
James R. Redmond, M.S.J., Lecturer in Journalism. 
Perley I. Reed, Ph.D., Director and Professor Emeritus of Journalism. 
Guy H. Stewart, Ph.D., Professor of Journalism. 
Donald D. Stillman, M.S., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
William R. Summers, Jr., M.A., Professor of Journalism. 
C. Gregory Van Camp, M.S. J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Wayne R. Whitaker, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
David A. Wiley, M.S.J., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Paul G. Yeazell, M.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism. 
Michael J. Ziegler, B.A., Instructor in Journalism. 

JOURNALISM 303 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Academic Standards: Guy II. Stewart {Chairman); Gerald W. Ash, Richard L. Hop- 
kins, W. R. Summers, Jr.; Dean, ex officio. 
Scholarships: Paul A. Atkins (Chairman); Hunter P. McCartney, Guy H. Stewart. 

Da\ hi A. Wiley; Dean, ex officio. 

ACCREDITATION 

The School of Journalism is accredited by the American Council on Education 
for Journalism for the Advertising and News-Editorial sequences. A. C.E.J, approval 
is held by fifty-five colleges and universities in the United States. 

The quality of the School's program also has been recognized by member- 
ships in the American Association of Schools and Departments of Journalism and the 
American Society of Journalism School Administrators. 

PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS 

Almost from the inception of journalism instruction at West Virginia Univer- 
sity in the early 1920s, there has been a close and continuing relationship with the 
professionals among the mass media. 

The earliest associations were with the West Virginia Publishers Association 
and the West Virginia State Newspaper Council, and now the same relationship 
exists with the West Virginia Press Association, the successor to the two former 
groups. Moreover, close professional relationships have been expanded to include the 
West Virginia Broadcasters Association. An adjunct to the WVPA, the West Virginia 
Publications and Public Relations Section also has developed a close tie-in. 

These groups have provided continued support in seeking better facilities for 
journalism, and they have provided scholarships. 

In turn, the School of Journalism has provided a number of new services to 
the professionals in the 1960s. A number of regional advertising seminars have been 
conducted for newspaper publishers and retail merchants. Also, the School has pro- 
vided science writing symposia and a seminar on Appalachia for practicing news- 
men, and it has jointly worked with the P&PR Section of the WVPA in setting up 
seminars. The School has additionally assisted the teachers of journalism by holding 
summer workshops. 

TYPEWRITING 

Before or soon after entering the University, a student planning to become a 
journalism major should learn the touch system of typing. From the beginning all 
students in writing courses are expected to submit copy in neat, typewritten form. 

PROFICIENCY IN ENGLISH 

A studenl who proposes to major in journalism must achieve a 2.5 average 01 
higher in English 1 and 2, or he must satisfactorily complete English 18 or English 
111. 

All transfer students arc required to lake the English proficiency examination 
in their first semester of residence, except for Potomac State College transferees. 

No student may proceed to the upper division (junior year) until he has either 
(\) received a grade of "C" or better in English 2 at West Virginia University, 
(2) passed the University's English proficiency examination, or (3) been excused 
because of high scores on the English competency examination. 

304 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN JOURNALISM 

A candidate who has satisfied all general requirements of the University and 
who also has met the requirements of the School of Journalism will be recommended 
for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism or Bachelor of Science in Jour- 
nalism Education, provided the combined number of his credits acquired as a pre- 
joumalism student and as a regularly enrolled journalism major totals no fewer than 
128. 

As a minimum professional requirement, 30-33 semester hours must be ob- 
tained in journalism subjects. No fewer than 40 semester credits shall be obtained in 
courses numbered between 100 and 300. 



EXEMPTION FROM REQUIREMENTS 

Exemption from any professional course because of professional journalistic 
experience that a student may have had will be granted only after the student has 
submitted satisfactory evidence as to the nature and quality of the experience. For 
such exemptions, approved advanced courses shall be substituted. Credit toward a 
degr< e can be granted for practical work only by special examination. 



SCHOLASTIC REQUIREMENTS 

To be eligible for graduation, a student must earn as a minimum a cumulative 
average of 2.0 grade points with at least a 2.5 journalism average. 

No student will be recommended for the degree unless he has shown to the 
satisfaction of the faculty that he possesses abilities and qualities which give promise 
that he can do adequate work in professional journalism. 



PROBATION 

A student on probation shall not take more than 15 hours of course work in a 
semester, and the Committee on Academic Standards may require that he not take 
more than 12. 



THE MINOR FIELD 

To meet the requirements for a minor, a student must earn at least 15 semester 
credits in a subject other than journalism, 12 of which must be in courses numbered 
100-199 or 200-299. Courses at 100 level or higher, even when they can be taken 
more than once, will be counted only one time towards the minor. For students pur- 
suing two minors simultaneously, the requirement in each area is at least 12 semester 
credits, of which 9 must be in upper-division courses (those numbered 100 and 
above). A student should consult his adviser about a minor. 

Students from other major fields of study are permitted to minor in journal- 
ism. 



JOURNALISM 305 



NEWS/EDITORIAL 



This curriculum is devoted to teaching fact-gathering, news and feature writing, and 
the various skills of editing. 

The sequence stemmed from the first courses offered in journalism at West 
Virginia University. Over the years it has expanded and been improved and today 
is fully accredited by the American Council on Education for Journalism (ACEJ), 
known throughout the country for its recognition of superior journalism programs. 
Also, the School has the approval of the American Society of Journalism School Ad- 
ministrators. 

Most news-editorial graduates have found employment on newspapers, maga- 
zines, and other publications or with the international press associations. This, in part, 
is because they have received excellent preparation for such careers in print media 
by working on the staff of the student newspaper, the Daily Athenaeum, which is 
produced in journalism laboratories. 

Other graduates, however, have gone into broadcasting or public relations or 
hold writing and editing positions in the professions, scientific fields, business, in- 
dustry, and government. 

News-editorial students most frequently minor in political science, history, or 
English. But it is becoming more common for them to select such areas as sociology, 
psychology, speech, and drama. 

The key to this curriculum is the same as it has been in the past— a wide 
range of interests and a love of language and writing. 

First Year Second Year 

Journalism 1 1 Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 2 2 Journalism 19 3 

English 1 3 Journalism 120 2 

English 2 3 History 52 3 

History or Humanities 1 and 2 6 History 53 3 

Science 8 Economics 51 3 

Psychology 1 or Philosophy 10 3 Economics 52 3 

Political Science 2 3 English 4 ( 164 ) 3 

Political Science 120 3 English 6 3 

Physical Education 2 Science 4 

Physical Education (women only) 2 

Third Year Fourth Year 

Journalism 118 3 Journalism 227 3 

Journalism 119 3 Journalism 228 3 

Journalism 128 2 Journalism 230 3 

Journalism 201 1 Minor (upper division) 6 

Minor (upper division) Electives 13-15 

Electives 15 Journalism electives 2-4 

°8 hours of military courses may be chosen during freshman and sophomore years and an 
equal Dumber of hours of required subjects delayed. 

Approved journalism electives: Journalism 80, 108, 110, 113, 170, 182, 183, 212, 220. 

Note: Students who do not take Humanities 1 and 2 will have to add Core A courses to 

their pro g r a ms. 
3()fi 



ADVERTISING 



The curriculum is designed to prepare students for careers in the creation, sales, man- 
agement, and production of advertising. 

Journalism 110 and 113 are the basic courses in the sequence. Everything 
else in advertising instruction is founded on these courses. 

Students develop a specialization in advertising in their senior year. They may 
elect two of the following four courses for their specialization: Media Management 
(203), Media Buying (204), Advertising Production (210), and/or Broadcast Ad- 
vertising (286). 

The required minor is subject to the approval of the adviser. Some of the 
approved minors are marketing, economics, management, finance, business law, psy- 
chology, sociology, and political science. Fifteen credits, 12 in upper-division courses 
(numbered 100 or above), are required for the minor. A second minor is optional. 

Students interested in advertising photography may elect Journalism 120 and 
131. 

Those persons who are interested in practical application of advertising pro- 
duction problems should consider working part-time in the offset production plant 
of the Daily Athenaeum in addition to electing Journalism 210. 

Advertising is an important part of the free enterprise system. Here, students 
in this specialization prepare themselves for careers with advertising agencies, com- 
pany advertising departments, retail advertising, promotion, and the media. 

The advertising curriculum is accredited by A. C.E.J. 

First Year Second Year 

Journalism 1 2 Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 2 1 Journalism 19 3 

English 1 3 Journalism 110 2 

English 2 3 Journalism 113 3 

Science 8 English 4 ( 164) 3 

Humanities 1* 3 English 6 3 

Humanities 2* 3 Economics 51 3 

Political Science 2 3 Economics 52 3 

Psychology 1 3 History 52 3 

Physical Education 2 History 53 3 

Physical Education** 2 

Third Year Fourth Year 

Journalism 114 2 Journalism 203*** 3 

Journalism 115 2 Journalism 204*** 3 

Journalism 201 1 Journalism 210*** 3 

Journalism electives 6 Journalism 239 2 

Minor Field 6 Journalism 286*** 3 

Electives 18 Minor Field 6 

Electives 17 

•Advertising students may substitute History 1 and 2 for Humanities 1 and 2, but they 
must then take 6 more hours of Core A subjects. 

° "Military Science or Aerospace Studies may be substituted for 2 hours of Physical Edu- 
cation for men. 

°° "Advertising majors must take two of these four courses. 

JOURNALISM 307 



BROADCAST JOURNALISM 



This curriculum provides students the opportunity to learn the theory and application 
to enter the specialized field of broadcast news and public affairs programing. The 
curriculum is coordinated with a technique-oriented curriculum of the Department 
of Speech. Courses are planned to enhance mutually each of the two programs and 
to provide a unified approach to broadcast education. 

There is a common numbering of certain interrelated courses, and there is an 
interdisciplinary pattern of teaching between Journalism and Speech. Cooperation, 
team teaching, and a meshing of staff are achieved wherever possible. 

In addition, members of the professional staff of the University's Office of 
Radio, Television, and Motion Pictures hold joint appointments and teach broadcast 
courses in journalism. This office operates the University-owned educational tele- 
vision station, WWVU-TV. 

Supported by a broad liberal arts background, the curriculum features an 
effective preparation for the student in the philosophy and artistic skills of pro- 
fessional broadcasting. Such training provides the student with an appreciation of 
radio, television, and motion pictures as communicative and journalistic arts, and it 
offers an ability to evaluate and criticize broadcast media functions and influence 
in society. 

Students who wish to work in the news and information areas in broadcasting 
should pursue the basic curriculum. A double minor is required. One of these minors 
must be speech; political science is recommended for the second. 



First Year 

Journalism 1 2 

English 1 3 

English 2 3 

Physical Education 2 

Physical Science or 

Biology 1 and 2 8 

History or Humanities 1 and 2 6 

Psychology 1 or Philosophy 10 3 

Political Science 2 3 

Speech 3 . . 3 

Third Year 

Journalism 80 3 

Journalism 182 3 

journalism 183 3 

Journalism 201 1 

Journalism 228 3 

Speech 1S1 3 

Speech electh e 3 

Economics 51 3 

Economics 52 3 

Political Science electives 6 



Second Year 

Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 19 3 

Physical Education* 2 

English 4 (164) 3 

English 6 3 

History 52 3 

History 53 3 

Political Science 120 3 

Science/Mathematics 4 

Core A electives 6 

Fourth Year 

Journalism 189 3 

Journalism 281 3 

Journalism 282 3 

Journalism elective 3 

Speech elective ... 3 

Electives 16 



•Men may substitute Military S< ience or Aerospace studies. 

Approved [ournalisin electives: Journalism 113, 120, 128, 212, 227, 243, 286, 



289. 



308 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 



A relatively new profession within the sphere of communications, public relations 
offers practitioners challenging opportunities to explain organizations— industrial, edu- 
cational, military, charitable— to their publics. The profession has had its major ad- 
vance since World War II, and today more than 100,000 persons are practicing in 
the field. Demands for practitioners far outstrip the supply, and WVU graduates are 
finding ready acceptance of their services. 

Public relations offers rewarding careers to women as well as to men. Several 
fields— transportation, entertainment, convention arrangements, and company news- 
papers—seem to prefer the feminine touch. Husband and wife PR teams are not un- 
common, so the woman who wishes to follow a dual career— homemaker and part- 
time or full-time vocational work— finds public relations a flexible activity to fit her 
uncertain schedule. 

The PR curriculum is organized to provide the student a comprehensive 
familiarity with all aspects of communications— written, spoken, and image. The stu- 
dent learns to gather, interpret, and present information in the varied media of com- 
munications—newspapers, radio and TV, and specialized forms (brochures, reports, 
slides, speeches, etc.). He learns principles of advertising, photography, topography 
and layout, PR programing, and organizational and managemtnt functions. 

A public relations major is encouraged to select a minor that will provide him 
a deeper understanding of personal and interpersonal relationships, e.g. political 
science, psychology, sociology, or one that will enhance his projected area of prac- 
tice, e.g. commerce, education, science. 



Fir^t Year 
Journalism 1 

Journalism 2 

English 1 

English 2 

Physical Education 

History or Humanities 1 and 2 

Science 8 

Psychology 1 or Philosophy 10 
Core A 



Third Year 



Journalism 110 
Journalism 113 
Journalism 118 
Journalism 120 
Journalism 212 
Political Science 
Speech 1 1 
Minor subject 
Electives 



120 



Second Year 

Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 19 3 

Economics 51 3 

Economics 52 3 

English 4 or 164 3 

English 6 3 

History 52 3 

History 53 3 

Physical Education* 2 

Minor subject 3 

Science/Mathematics 4 

Fourth Year 

Journalism 201 1 

Journalism 213 2 

Journalism 230 .3 

Journalism electives . 2-5 

Minor subject 6 

Electives 16 



Men may substitute Military Science or Aerospace Studies. 



JOl'RXM.ISM 



309 



JOURNALISM EDUCATION 



The School of Journalism has been working for a number of years with the 
journalism teachers and administrators in the schools of the state to improve journal- 
ism instruction and school publications. An even greater effort has been mounted 
since 1960 by way of regional high school workshops, summer workshops for stu- 
dents and teachers on the University campus, and individual consultation with 
schools by members of the School of Journalism faculty. 

One of the outgrowths of this cooperative effort has been a new certification 
program in journalism. There were quasi-official certification programs until 1966, 
but since that time it has been possible for a person to be certified to teach journal- 
ism. The student who finishes the curriculum outlined here and receives the Bachelor 
of Science in Journalism degree will qualify for a first-class professional certificate in 
West Virginia with teaching fields in Journalism and English (or other fields of 
student's choice), Grades 7-12. 

While English is selected as the second field by most Journalism majors, one 
may name social studies, speech, art, or another field. However, one must also add 
nine hours of English and speech from the General Studies section of the certification 
program. 

If a student elects Journalism as a second field, he must take Journalism 1, 
18, 19, 120, 215, and 227 for a total of 15 hours plus 6 hours of Journalism elec- 
tives. 

A student must attain an overall grade-point average of 2.25 before he is ad- 
mitted to student teaching, and his grade-point average must be at least 2.0 in any 
field he chooses for certification. Furthermore, the student must not plan to enroll 
for any courses outside of the teaching block in the semester during which he plans 
to do student teaching; he may have to teach in a community away from Morgan- 
town. 

First Year Second Year 

Journalism 1 2 Journalism 18 3 

Journalism 2 1 Journalism 19 3 

English 1 3 Mathematics 21* 2 

English 2 3 Mathematics 22 2 

Science 8 Health Education 102 2 

Art 30 3 Social Science 1*° 3 

Music 10 3 Social Science 2 3 

History 1 3 English 3 ( 163) 3 

History 2 3 English 4 ( 164 ) 3 

Physical Education 2 English 5 3 

English 6 3 

Physical Education** 2 

•Mathematics 15 (4 hr. ) may be substituted for Mathematics 21 and 22. 
"•Economics 51 (3 hr.), Political Science 2 (3 hr.), and Sociology 1 (3 hr.) may be 
substituted for Social Science 1 and 2. 

"••Military Science or Aerospace Studies may be substituted by men for two hours in 
Physical Education. 



310 



Third Year Fourth Year 

Journalism 118 3 Journalism 120 2 

Journalism 215 2 Journalism 227 3 

Education 100 1 Journalism 230 3 

Education 105 3 Education 124 6 

Education 106 3 Education 120 4 

Education elective 2 Education 150-170 2 

Journalism electives 4-5 Journalism electives 4-5 

English 111 3 English 138, 139, 247, 248, 249, 

English 142 3 257, 258 3 

English 166, 250, 270 3 English 118, 278, 280 or 

English 140, 141, 234, 244, 245 ... . 3 Humanities 141, 142 3 

Speech 3, 11 or Drama 50 3 

Approved Journalism Electives: Journalism 110, 113, 201, 212, 228, 241. 

Note: If a student does not take 32 hours of journalism, he must add a 2-hour elective 
from another field in order to complete a minimum of 128 hours for the degree. Where English 
courses are listed in multiple numbers in the third and fourth years, the student chooses only one 
course from each grouping. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



1. Introduction to Mass Communications. I, II, S. 2 hr. Recommended for all 
University students. Role of the mass communicator in developing the politi- 
cal, social, and economic fabrics of a democratic society. Organization and 
function of newspapers, magazines, broadcast stations, and other principal 
media of mass communications, including the role of advertising. 

2. Lectures in Journalism. II. 1 hr. Open to all University students. A series of 
one-hour weekly addresses by specialists representing the principal mass com- 
munications industries and professions. 

18. News Writing. I, II, S. 3 hr. Two lee. and a 2-hr. lab-demonstration period. 
The essentials of fact-gathering; writing news and features; attention is also 
given to the ethics and responsibilities of reporting the news. 

19. Copy Editing and Make-Up. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 18. Two lee. and a 2-hr. 
lab-demonstration period. A study of copy editing, headline writing, the hand- 
ling of wire copy, and newspaper make-up. 

80. Introduction to Broadcasting. I, II, S. 3 hr. Survey of the industry and its role 
in today's society. Historical development of broadcasting, its responsibilities, 
and job opportunities. Organization of stations and their relation to networks, 
Federal regulations, and industry codes. Technical aspects of radio and tele- 
vision. Brief consideration of programing and production techniques. Field 
trips to area commercial and educational stations (also listed as Speech 80). 

89. Appreciation of the Motion Picture. I, II. 3 hr. Viewing lab. An introduction 
to the appreciation of the motion picture and the television film as art forms. 
Principles of aesthetics involved in evaluating films. Attention given to the 
various types of film: art film, documentary, entertainment, experimental, in- 
structional, etc. Weekly viewing and evaluation sessions (also listed as Speech 
89). 

JOURNALISM 311 



108. The Community Newspaper. I. 2 hr. Open to all University students. Funda- 
mental problems and techniques in the operation and management of small 
community newspapers. 

110. Typography and Printing Processes. I, II, S. 2 hr. One lee. 2-hr. lab. Open to 
all University students. Fundamentals of print production, including design 
and composition procedures for major printing processes, discussion and appli- 
cation of typographic aesthetics. Students must acquire tools for the course: 
cost, about $3.00. 

113. Principles of Advertising. I, II, S. 3 hr. Open to all University students. Two 
lee. One 2-hr. lab. Survey of the function of advertising in the American eco- 
nomic system for national and retail advertisers. Study of individual adver- 
tising and media, copy and layout problems, appeals, research production, 
schedules, federal and state laws affecting advertising, and ethics. Practical 
laboratory work in writing and layout of advertising. 

114. Newspaper Advertising and Selling. I, II. 2 hr. PR: Journ. 110 and 113, or 
consent. Two hr. lecture. Planning, preparation of newspaper advertising cam- 
paign for the Daily Athenaeum, including supplementary assignments in radio 
copy, direct mail, outdoor advertising, and sales promotion. 

115. Advertising Copy and Layout. II. 2 hr. PR: Journ. 110, 113, and 114, or con- 
sent. Two hr. lecture. Copy platforms, print production and layout, mechani- 
cal specifications. Special assignments in direct mail and media research. 

118. Reporting. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: A grade of "C" or higher in Journ. 18. Nine 
laboratory hours on the Daily Athenaeum and one critique hour. 

119. Advanced Editing and Make-up. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: A grade of "C" or higher 
in Joum. 19. Nine laboratory hours on the Daily Athenaeum and one critique 
hour. 

120. Introduction to Photography. I, II, S. 2 hr. Open to all University students. 
One lee. hour, and one 3-hr. lab. Students learn to develop, print, and en- 
large. Each student is required to purchase his own film and enlarging paper, 
costing $10.00-$15.00. Students also are urged to rent a camera from the 
Book Store at $20.00 per semester. Chemicals are provided by the School. 

128. Reporting of Public Affairs. II. 2 hr. PR: Journ. 18 or consent. Reporting of 
local, state, and federal government activities and other public affairs. In- 
cludes visits to public agencies and training in spot news and depth reporting 
in public affairs. 

130. News Photography. I. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 120 or consent. Students learn relation- 
ship between words and pictures, how they express ideas, relate information, 
create moods. Students produce their own still-photo documentaries. Emphasis 
is on creativity and self-expression. 

131. Advertising Photography. II. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 120 or consent and Journ. 113. 
Fundamentals of studio and outdoor photography layout and design. 

170. Mechanical Composition. I, II, S. 1 hr. PR: Journ. 110. Practical work with 
offset equipment involved in small newspaper production. One 3-hr. lab. -lee. 

L82. Radio News. I. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 80 or consent. The student learns interview 
techniques, news writing style, and on t he-spot reporting. Also included are 
the modern trends in radio reporting, including 'he all-news radio format. 
Laboratory work entails realistic presentation of news on the air. 

183. Television News. II. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 182 or consent. Deals with the tech- 
niques of gathering, preparing, and presenting news through the TV medium. 

The course emphasizes motion picture news coverage, film editing, and news 
writing. Experience is provided in on-the-spot sound film interviews. Lab- 
oratory work includes actual preparation of news for presentation on the air. 

312 



189 Techniques of Motion Picture Production. I. 3 hr. Laboratory fee. Morion pic- 
Uire directing, editing, lighting, cinematography, and sound record**. Lec- 
ture and laboratory (also listed as Speech 189). 
201 Interpreting Current Events. I, II, S. 1 hr. This course emphasizes the socio- 
logical ideological, historical, and political implications of current events 
Sucted in a discission format, it requires the student to relate news events 
to a framework of readings by authors from any appropnate period. 
203. Media Management and Promotion I, II S. 3 hr. PR: Jo»™- "3 and U5 
Problems, functions, and responsibilities m communications F"**"*"™ 
tion operation, management, and promotion. Special emphasis on case study 
of media management and promotion in the Appalachian area. 
004 Advertising Markets and Media. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Jonrn. 113. A study of ad- 
vertising planning, buying, and scheduling by advertisers, media, and adver- 
fcng agencies on national and local levels. Seminar discussions and I assign- 
ments with special emphasis on problems related to Appalachian markets and 
media. 
910 Advertising Production. II. 3 hr. PR: Joum. HO. Techniques and mechanics 
of producing print advertising. Study includes art, typography prin tmg pro- 
cesses, layout, and make-up. Student must acquire tools and supplies for lab 
work; cost: about $10.00. 
212. Public Relations. I, II, S. 3 hr. Open to all University students This survey 
course introduces the student to the principles, problems and practices of 
communication between an organization and its publics. The definition and 
£S development, the opportunities and challenges, the techniques and 
management of public relations are included. Written assignments include 
r^o book reports and typical PR communication projects-the promotional 
pamphlet, the executive speech, the news release, and others. 
213 Industrial Journalism. II. 2 hr. Open to all University students; required in 
Public Relations curriculum. A study of the relations between industry and 
its many publics, with emphasis on internal and external company publications 
as public relations media. Extensive practice in planning and writing materials 
and in page make up for industrial publications and trade journals. 
215 High School Journalism. II, S. 2 hr. Open to all University students. A survey 

of scholastic publications and techniques; suggested methods of instruction. 
220. Newspaper and Magazine Article Writing. I, II. 2 hr. Open to all University 
students. A seminar-type course devoted to the writing, editing, and market- 
ing of features, including reviews and critical articles. 
227. History of Journalism. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Hist. 52 and 53 or consent. Open to all 
University students. A study of the impact of the American press on the 
nation- the development of todays communications media from the begin- 
nings in seventeenth century England and in the American colonies; an exami- 
nation of the great names in journalism from the standpoint of their contribu- 
tions to today's journalism; freedom of the press and its current implications. 
228 Law of the News Media. II. 3 hr. For seniors and graduate students. A study 
of the law as it affects the mass media. Considered are such areas as libel. 
public records, criminal pre-trial publicity, freedom of information, obscenity. 

230 Editorial and Interpretive Writing. I, II. 3 hr. Open to all University students 
The student will analyze and write editorials and commentaries. He will 
study typical editorial pages and the ethics governing editorial page content. 
He will also become familiar with libel, privacy, contempt, and other prob- 
lems-operating and political— as they arise. 

239 Seminar in Advertising Management Problems. I. 2 hr. PR: Senior standing 
and major or minor in Advertising. Current trends in advertising, merchan- 
dising, and distribution problems. Students develop individual projects in some 
phase of advertising or management. 

JOURNALISM 313 



241. Journalism Problems. I, II, S. 1-3 hr. For seniors and graduates. An intensive 
study, independently conducted, of a specialized area or problem in journal- 
ism; to be approved by the Dean. 

242. Advanced Journalism Problems. I, II, S. 1-3 hr. A continuation of Joum. 241. 

243. International Communications. I. 3 hr. International news gathering and dis- 
semination—including wire services, broadcast satellites, and political barriers- 
will be examined, particularly as these factors affect a free exchange of in- 
formation within the world community. Efforts by the United Nations to en- 
courage news exchange and to lower news barriers will be a major case ex- 
amination. 

281. Public Affairs Programing. I. 3 hr. PR: Joum. 183 or consent. The basic prin- 
ciples of evaluating and documenting public issues into television and radio 
presentation form. Includes methods of program selection, research, writing, 
sources and type of content materials. 

282. Public Affairs Programing. II. 3 hr. PR: Joum. 281. Continuation of Journ. 
281. An in-depth laboratory course in actual preparation of materials for in- 
clusion of public issues programs. Work includes filming and recording inter- 
views, background materials, obtaining and selecting supporting sound, music, 
art. 

286. Radio and Television Advertising. I. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 113 or Speech 184 and 
consent. Development of radio and television writing techniques. Media plan- 
ning, buying, and market analysis. Federal regulations affecting advertising in 
broadcast media. 

289. Documentary Motion Picture Production. II. 3 hr. PR: Journ. 189 and Journ. 
281 or Speech 184 or Speech 280. An in-depth development of the techniques 
and resources utilized in the production of a complete documentary motion 
picture. Areas of study include films, processing, cinematography, editing, re- 
search, writing, music, narration. Laboratory-oriented. Lab fee (also listed as 
Speech 289). 



314 



The Division of Military Science and 
The Division of Aerospace Studies 



West Virginia University, a beneficiary of the Act of Congress of 1862, offers quali- 
fied applicants two and four-year courses of instruction in Military Science and Air 
Force Aerospace Studies. Normally successful completion of one of these courses and 
degree requirements leads to a commission as Second Lieutenant in the United States 
Army Reserve, or the United States Air Force Reserve. Distinguished military grad- 
uates of West Virginia University may apply for and be offered commissions as sec- 
ond lieutenants in the Regular Army or the Regular Air Force, under conditions pre- 
scribed by law. 

The four-year course comprises two years of basic training (Military Science 
1, 2, 3, and 4, or Air Force Aerospace Studies 1, 2, 3, and 4); two years of advanced 
training (Military Science 105, 106, 107, 108, or Air Force Aerospace Studies 105, 
106, 107, and 108); and summer camp for six weeks' duration for Military Science 
students and four weeks' summer training for Air Force students during the summer 
following the junior year. The Army summer camp and Air Force summer training 
is conducted at government expense, and eligible students are paid approximately 
$150 monthly in addition to traveling expenses at the rate of 6 cents per mile. 

These courses are available to male students who are mentally and physically 
qualified and who voluntarily make application. 

Transfer Junior level students may apply for the two-year Advanced ROTC 
commissioning programs through the Professor of Military Science or the Professor 
of Aerospace Studies not later than January 31 in the academic year preceding the 
academic year in which they would be enrolled in advanced training. They must 
participate in six weeks summer training at a designated Army or Air Force installa- 
tion prior to the fall semester. During this training the students will be paid at the 
rate of approximately $90.00 per month, with travel pay at 6 cents per mile to and 
from training. 

Equivalent credit for part or all of the four basic semesters of ROTC may be 
granted in accordance with existing service regulations. These regulations may apply 
for: prior active military service, high school ROTC, Military School (Army ROTC 
at high school level), attendance at Service Academies, Junior College Senior Di- 
vision Army ROTC, or Civil Air Patrol training. 

Within deferment quotas established by Public Law 758, 80th Congress, quali- 
fied and selected enrolled students are offered the opportunity of being deferred by 
the Professor of Military Science or the Professor of Aerospace Studies from military 
service under the Selective Service Act of 1948 and Selective Service Extension Act 
of 1950, as amended by the Universal Military Training and Service Act, November, 
1951, as amended, until completion of their military courses and receipt of the bac- 
calaureate degree. Such deferment is subject to cancellation should the student not 
be selected for the advanced course, fail to remain in good standing, or fail to de- 
velop the qualities expected of an officer. 



315 



MILITARY SCIENCE FACULTY AND STAFF 

Charles G. I\<s, COL, B.S., Professor of Military Science. 

Herbert E. Clark, LTC, B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Nelson R. Bickley, Jr., LTC, B.A., Assistant Professor of Military Scienci . 

James W. Cain, LTC, B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Robert E. Weber, LTC, B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Thomas R. Bruffy, MAJ, B.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Anthony A. Polis, MAJ, B.S., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

James C. Dooley, CAPT, B.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

John C. Kehoe, III, CAPT, B.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Martin J. Kedra, Jr., CAPT, B.A., Assistant Professor of Military Science. 

Robert B. Snider, SGM, Sergeant Major in Military Science. 

Conrad O. Favro, SFC, Instructor in Military Science. 

Robert J. McNickle, SSG, Instructor in Military Science and Rifle Team Coach. 



AIR FORCE AEROSPACE STUDIES FACULTY AND STAFF 

Chaz M. Holland, COL, M.B.A., Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

James R. Curtis, MAJ, B.S., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

Leon C. Nedbalek, MAJ, M.S., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

Robert L. Van Meter, MAJ, A.B., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

Eugene W. Shade, CAPT, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies. 

Howard L. Rose, MSG, Sergeant Major in Aerospace Studies. 

David H. Love, TSG, Personnel Specialist in Aerospace Studies. 

Robert E. Seanor, TSG, Training NCO in Aerospace Studies. 

George W. Musser, SSG, Administrative Specialist in Aerospace Studies. 

Terry J. Tyson, SSG, Personnel Specialist in Aerospace Studies. 



ORGANIZATION 

The conduct of military science and aerospace studies instruction is the re- 
sponsibility of the Professor of Military Science and the Professor of Aerospace 
Studies, who, together with their military staffs, are officers and non-commissioned 
officers of the U.S. Army and the U.S. Air Force on duty at West Virginia University. 



ROTC FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM 

Both the Air Force and the Army provide a substantial number of financial 
assistance grants to selected students, to include lull tuition, textbooks, laboratory 
fees, and an allowance of $50.00 per month. 

Air Force grants are provided for from one to four years. Army grants are for 
either two or four years. 



ALLOWANCES 

'I In Advanced Course (Army) or Professional Officer's Course (Air Force) 
student is paid an allowance of $50.00 per month. 

316 



DEPOSIT 

All ROTC students are required to pay a deposit of $20.00 to cover any loss or 
damage to issued property in his possession. The deposit is paid to the University 
Comptroller at time of registration and is refunded, less a nominal administrative and 
service charge, upon return of the undamaged property. Cadets in both officer com- 
missioning programs are permitted to retain their uniforms upon successful com- 
pletion of the program. 



CURRICULA 



General Military Course, Air Force Aerospace Studies: Instruction averages 
two hours per week throughout the four semesters. Corps Training is accomplished 
during two-hour periods in the first half of each fall term. Spring term Corps Train- 
ing is accomplished during one-hour classroom periods throughout the semester. Two 
hours of effective credit is allowed for each of the four semesters' work. 

Basic Course, Military Science: Instruction averages two hours per week for 
the two semesters of the freshman year and three hours per week for the two 
semesters of the sophomore year. One hour per week (two for sophomores) is con- 
ducted in the classroom and for half of each semester (first half of the first semester, 
last half of the second semester) a two-hour laboratory is conducted each week in 
which the student receives instruction in drill and command. These laboratories are 
held Tuesday and Friday. Two hours of effective credit is allowed for each semester's 
work. 

Advanced Course (Army)— Professional Officer's Course (Air Force): The 
third and fourth years of instruction in Military Science or Aerospace Studies cor- 
respond to the junior and senior years of the student's academic course. Entrance in- 
to either program is elective on the part of the student and selective on the part of 
the services. Selection is based on the student's record and on service regulations and 
in both services is limited in total numbers by yearly quotas. Application for either 
program should be made at the beginning of the second semester of the student's 
sophomore year. A student must complete the basic Army or Air Force course, or if 
transferring from a college or university not offering ROTC, complete a six-week 
summer camp prior to entering Military Science 105 or Aerospace Studies 105. Eligi- 
bility for either program begins with successful completion of an officer's qualifying 
test in the first semester of the sophomore year. All candidates must pass a physical 
examination and meet a selection board in the second semester of the sophomore 
year. A grade-point average of 2.0 is one of the prerequisites for enrollment in either 
program. 

Each student who is enrolled in either program agrees to complete the course 
including summer camp and, if tendered, accept a commission as a second lieutenant 
in the U.S. Army or Air Force as a prerequisite for graduation from the University. 
unless excused by proper authority. 

Senior Aerospace Studies students enrolled as Category I (Pilot) are required 
to participate in the Flight Instruction Program. This program consists of 30 hours of 
ground instruction and 36 M hours of dual and solo flight instruction for the private 
pilot's license. Senior Military Science students may also participate in the flight in- 
struction program. There are no individual fees for this program. 

MILITARY 317 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Basic Course— First Year (Army) 

Military Science 1. 2 hr. Leadership laboratory; the United States defense establish- 
ment; military weapons. Three hours per week during the first half of the 
semester; one hour per week during the second half of the semester. 

Military Science 2. 2 hr. Leadership laboratory; the United States defense establish- 
ment (continued); military weapons (continued). One hour per week during 
the first half of the semester; three hours per week during the second half of 
the semester. 

General Military Course (GMC)— First Year (Air Force) 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 1. 2 hr. Nature and principles of war, national policy 
and power, U.S. defense establishment, U.S. Air Force. One classroom hour 
per week throughout the semester and two hours per week of corps training 
during the first half of the semester. 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 2. 2 hr. U.S. strategic offensive forces; U.S. strategic 
defensive forces, civil defense. Two classroom hours per week throughout the 
semester, consisting of one hour of academic plus one hour of corps training. 

Basic Course— Second Year (Army) 

Military Science 3. 2 hr. Leadership laboratory'; introduction to tactics and opera- 
tions; map reading. 4 hr. per week during the first half of the semester; 2 hr. 
per week during the second half of the semester. 

Military Science 4. 2 hr. Leadership laboratory; American military history. 2 hr. per 
week during the first half of the semester; 4 hr. per week during the second 
half of the semester. 

General Military' Course (GMC)— Second Year (Air Force) 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 3. 2 hr. U.S. general purpose forces, tactical air forces, 
U.S. aerospace support forces. One classroom hour per week throughout the 
semester and two hours per week of corps training during the first half of the 
semester. 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 4. 2 hr. U.S. aerospace support forces, conflict between 
democracy and communism, alliances and alignments, contemporary military 
thought. Two classroom hours per week throughout the semester, consisting 
of one hour of academics plus one hour of corps training. 

Advanced Course— Third Year (Army) 

Military Science 105. 3 hr. PR: Basic course or c<juiv.° Leadership laboratory; leader- 
ship and management I. 5 hr. per week during first half of the semester and 
3 hr. per week during the second half of the semester. 

Military Science 106'. 3 lir. Leadership laboratory; fundamentals and dynamics of the 
military team I: pie-camp orientation. 3 hr. per week during the first half of 
the semester and 5 hi. per week during the second half of the semester. 

318 



Professional Officer Course (POC)-Third Year (Air Force) 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 105. 3 hr. PR: Basic Course or equiv.° Corps training; 
growth and development of aerospace power. A survey course describing the 
nature of war, development of airpower in the United States, and Air Force 
concepts, doctrine and employment. 3 class hours. 1 corps training hour per 
week. 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 106. 3 hr. PR: Aerospace Studies 105 or consent. Corps 
training; growth and development of aerospace power. Astronautics and space 
operations, the future development of aerospace power, and the United States 
space programs, vehicles systems and problems in space exploration. 3 class 
hours. 1 corps training hours per week. 

Advanced Course— Fourth Year (Army) 

Military Science 107. 3 hr. Leadership laboratory; leadership and management II. 
5 hr. per week during the first half of the semester and 3 hr. per week during 
the second half of the semester. 

Military Science 108. 3 hr. Leadership laboratory. Fundamentals and dynamics of 
the military team II. 3 hr. per week during the first half of the semester and 
5 hr. per week during the second half of the semester. 

Professional Officer Course (POC)— Fourth Year (Air Force) 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 107. 3 hr. PR: Aerospace Studies 105 and 106 or con- 
sent. Corps training. Intensive study of military law, management, command 
and staff policies, and seminar of leadership theory and career opportunities 
in the Air Force. 3 class hours. 1 corps training hour per week. 

Air Force Aerospace Studies 108. 3 hr. PR: Aerospace Studies 105, 106, and 107 or 
consent. Corps training. Study of human relations, problem-solving techniques, 
management and leadership case studies; seminar on the junior officer in the 
Air Force. 3 class hours. 1 corps training hour per week. 



°Equivalent credit may be granted by Registrar of the University and either the Professor of 
Military Science or the Proft ssor of Aerospace Studies on the basis of prior military service or 
ROTC training other than courses in Military Science or Aerospace Studies taken at this Uni- 
versity. 

MILITARY 319 



The School of Physical Education 



The School of Physical Education was designed and is organized to study the func- 
tions of sport, dance, and human movement as they become increasingly important 
facets of the world in which we live. Why one is motivated to pursue the degrees 
offered through the School of Physical Education immediately becomes a complex 
question the answers to which are as varied as there are students pursuing these de- 
grees. Generally, however, there are specific interest areas which are common to all 
who are actively engaged in physical education. 



PRE-ENROLLMENT INTERESTS 

Secondary school students who wish to become physical education students in 
college share a common interest. They should possess a strong need for and appreci- 
ation of participation in sport, dance, and physical activity, and they should be 
interested in working with others. How skillful a person is becomes less important 
than how much he or she has a desire to participate. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS 

As one becomes involved in studying toward a degree in the School of Physical 
Education, he or she should develop at least one related interest with fellow class- 
mates. The professional student should be concerned about how and in what manner 
sport, dance, and physical activity contribute to our total culture and the cultures of 
other countries of the world and what ways these areas of physical education are 
affected by cultures and societies. A large percentage of physical educators practice 
their profession in the formal school systems of this country. The college student 
should become intensely interested in the social and psychological learnings and 
physical growth and development of school children through sport, dance, and physi- 
cal activity. 

On a typical day the student of physical education may be exposed to such 
general curricular areas as communication skills and methods, discussions pertaining 
to how people learn, practice in establishing an educational environment, discover- 
ing how children grow and develop, analyses of materials and methods of conduct- 
ing physical education programs, and means of evaluating the total physical educa- 
tion experience. Extracurricular activities include such situations as discussions with 
other students of physical education through club meetings about the nature of the 
profession and actual improvement of individual skills through active participation in 

sport and dance programs and campus clubs. 



FUTURE PROFESSIONAL INTERESTS 

The physical educator who cams a bachelor's degree Finds many professional 
opportunities open to him or her. There are immediate possibilities of teaching physi- 
cal education and/or dance in schools. Exciting professional employment may be 

gained in the aimed hares, boys' and girls' clubs, veterans administration, Y.M.C.A., 

320 



Y.W.C.A., private athletic clubs, and community and industrial recreation projects. 
Administrators of the Red Cross, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, and private and public 
camps find the competencies of the physical educator very beneficial. 

The physical education student may be interested in concentrating in many 
allied professional endeavors for which his undergraduate degree affords preparation. 
Men and women are called upon to organize, administer, and coach athletic teams. 
The student may elect to further his or her education by pursuing an advanced de- 
gree. These degrees are the master's degree or the doctor of education degree. Their 
programs are designed to provide an opportunity to study the areas of sport, dance, 
and physical activity in depth. 

The School of Physical Education also offers undergraduate preparation lead- 
ing to certification in the field of safety education. An advanced degree in safety 
education at both the master's and doctoral levels provides many employment outlets 
in industry and in education. 

Housed within the School is an undergraduate curriculum in pre-physical 
therapy which will enable the student to become certified as a physical therapist up- 
on completion of studies in a physical therapy school of his or her choice. 



FACILITIES 

The facilities used by the School of Physical Education are the gymnasium, 
dance studio, and swimming pool located in Elizabeth Moore Hall, gymnasiums in 
the Field House, swimming pool in the "Old" Mountainlair, bowling lanes in Moun- 
tainlair, outdoor areas including a golf course on the Evansdale Campus, and tennis 
courts adjacent to the Field House. 

The Coliseum, scheduled for completion during the 1969-70 school year, will 
contain the Ray O. Duncan Memorial Library, classrooms and seminar rooms, one 
large gymnasium for instruction in sport skills, handball and squash courts, dance 
studio, adapted physical education and weight training room, safety education lab- 
oratory, research laboratory', and offices for the School of Physical Education staff. 



FACULTY 

C. Peter Yost, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Physical Education and Professor of 

Physical Education. 
Richard Bell, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football Coach. 
Paul Bennett, B.S., Instructor (part-time) in Physical Education. 
Charity White Beto, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
Robert W. Bissell, M.S., Trainer and Instructor in Physical Education. 
Kittie Jean Blakemore, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
William A. Bonsall, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Gymnastics 

Coach. 
Robert C. Bowden, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football 

Coach. 
Robert C. Brown, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football Coach. 
Robert N. Brown, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Director of 

Intercollegiate Athletics. 
Claude H. Buckley, M.Ed., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football 

Coach. 
Wincie Ann Carruth, Ph.D., Professor of Physical Education and Chairman of 

Department of Physical Education for Women. 
James A. Carlen, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Head Football Coach. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATIOS 321 



E. Eugene Coruni, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Dale Evans, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football Coach. 

Jack C. Fligg. M.A., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Football Coach. 

Kevin Gilson, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Swimming Coach. 

Mary Kay Gilson, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Grace M. Griffin, A.M., Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. 

Albert C. Gwynne, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Trainer. 

Samuel Halstead, B.S., Instructor (part-time) in Physical Education. 

Stephen Harrick, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. 

John W. Hesen, M.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education and Athletic Team 

Physician. 
Beatrice Hurst, M.A., Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. 
Garland E. Moran, Jr., M.A., Instructor in Physical Education and Head Basketball 

Coach. 

Samuel J. Morris, M.D., Professor Emeritus of Physical Education. 

Richard F. Mull, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 

George Nedeff, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Wrestling Coach. 

Mary Jane Pearse, M.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Dale Ramsburg, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Baseball Coach. 

James L. Riffle, M.S., Instructor in Safety Education. 

Stanley E. Romanoski, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Coach of Track 

Athletics. 
John Semon, M.S., Associate Professor of Physical Education and Chairman of 

Department of Physical Education for Men. 
Thomas J. Sheehan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
J. Edward Shockey, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant to Athletic 

Director. 
Patrick A. Tork, M.S., Professor of Physical Education and Assistant to the Dean; 

Assistant to the Director of Athletics. 
Mary Katherine Wiedebusch, B.S., Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
Bruce W. Wilmoth, M.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Gordon C. Winsor, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education and Assistant Basketball 

Coach. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Members of the faculty of the School of Physical Education serve as advisers 
to student organizations which include: Physical Education Major Club, open to all 
majors and minors in Physical Education; Dolphin Club, for students interested in 
swimming; Orchesis, the University dance organization; Sigma Delta Psi, a national 
honorary athletic fraternity for men; and Fencing Club, open to all students interested 
in fencing. 



322 



INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

A broad intramural sports program for men and women is provided by the 
School. The intramural program encourages all students of the University to partici- 
pate in organized athletic sports and wholesome active recreation. Competition is 
promoted among student groups and individuals. 



GENERAL PROGRAM FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

The aims of the General Physical Education Program are to develop: 

1. An appreciation of the body and its capacity to move. 

2. Movement skills within the concept of games, sport, and dance. 

3. An appreciation of the value of continued movement, sport, dance through- 
out all age periods in an individual's life. 

4. An understanding of the cultural significance of sport and dance. 

5. Concepts of the physiological characteristics of protracted movement. 
The University's physical education requirements should be met by the men 

in their first year of residence and by women in their first two years of residence. 
Two hours of general program are required for men and four hours for women. 
Those students who are unable to participate in the regular program because of 
physical handicaps are assigned to the adapted program. 



GENERAL PROGRAM COURSES FOR MEN 

1 and 2. General Program for Men. 1 hr. Required of all freshmen in the University 
(except majors in Physical Education). Students who are found to be physically 
unable to engage in regular activity will be assigned to an adapted program 
of physical education recommended by University physicians and under the 
direction of the staff of the department. 

Student may select any one of the combinations of activities listed below. He 
will not be permitted to repeat his choice the second semester, but he will 
make another choice of entirely different activities. The student's adviser is 
responsible for seeing that a student does not repeat the same activities. 

The combination of activities are: 

A— Golf and Badminton F— Tennis and Volleyball 

B— Conditioning and Gymnastics G— Handball and Badminton 

C— Handball and Swimming H— Conditioning 

D— Tennis and Archery I— Adapted Program 

E— Volleyball and Archery 1J and 2J— Horseback Riding. 

Open to men ond women. 

GENERAL PROGRAM COURSES FOR WOMEN 

General Program for Women. Physical Education 3, Fundamentals of Physical Edu- 
cation, is required of all freshman women students in the fall semester with 
the exception of students enrolled in the pre-elementary education curriculum. 

The student should select one course from each of the following groups to 
complete the 4-hr. requirement. (On the recommendation of the adviser, Art, Drama, 
and Music majors may take two courses in Group 2 and select a course from Croup 1 
or Group 3 to complete the requirement). 

Group 1-Phys. Ed. 14, 15, 16 (Swimming) 

Group 2-Dance 5, 11, 17, 18 (Dance) 

Group 3-Phys. Ed 1J or 2J, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 

13, 21, 25 (Individual or Team Sports) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 323 



3. Fundamentals of Physical Education. 1. 1 hr. Physical self-image, principles 
of movement, movement patterns in spurts and daily living. Required of 
freshman women. 

4. Golf and Bowling. I, II. 1 hr. 

5. Ballroom Dance. I, II. 1 hr. Fundamentals of ballroom dancing. For men and 
women students. 

7. Archery. I, II. 1 hr. 

8. Recreational Sports. I, II. 1 hi. Badminton, table tennis, deck tennis, and 
shuffleboard. 

9. Team Sports. I. 1 hr. Volleyball and hockey. 

10. Team Sports. II. 1 hr. Basketball and softball. 

11. Folk Dancing. I, II. 1 hr. 

13. Tennis and Bowling. I, II. 1 hr. 

14. Elementary Swimming and Diving. I, II. 1 hi. 

15. Intermediate Swimming and Diving. I, II. 1 hr. 

16. Lifesaving and Water Safety. II. 1 hr. (Opportunity to qualify for American 
Red Cross Senior Lifesaving Certificate.) 

17. Elementary Modern Dance. I, II. 1 hr. 

18. Advanced Modern Dance. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 17. (Open to men and 
women). 

21. Physical Fitness. I, II. 1 hr. 
25. Fencing. I, II. 1 hr. 

Physical Education for Elementary Teachers (Not for P.E. Majors) 

Women students who are planning to teach in elementary grades are required 
to take the following courses to meet the 4-hr. requirement: 

41. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. I. 1 hr. (W). 

42. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. II. 1 hr. (W). 

43. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. I, II. 2 hr. 

Men students who are planning to teach in elementary grades are required to 
take the following courses: 

1. General Program for Men. I. 1 hr. 

2. General Program for Men. II. 1 hr. 

43. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. I, II. 2 hr. 



STUDENT PETITIONS 

1. Petitions may be submitted to the Committee on Academic Standards: 
(a) to register for more than maximum hours regularly allowed; (b) to register for 
less than minimum load; (c) for reentry after academic suspension; (d) to withdraw 
from courses whenever such withdrawal reduces tin- student's hour load below the 
required minimum, and (e) to withdraw from ■> course whenever a student is on 
academic probation. 

2. Petitions should bo prepared on special forms and must include t he recom 
mendation of the student's adviser. 

3. Barring unusual and union sem circumstances, a student is under obliga- 
tion to complete ili«' courses in which registration was made. Failure in a course does 
not constitute a reason for withdrawal. 

4. Students may appear in person before the Committee on Academic Stan- 
dards in support of their petition. 

5. Students ma) appeal decisions of their adviser and Committee on Aca- 
demic Standards to the Dean. 

6. Students should submit petitions at an early date. Delay may result in 
denial because sufficient evidence may not be available. 

324 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 



The degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education may be conferred 
upon any student who: (1) satisfies the entrance requirements, (2) offers at least 
128 hours, (3) has an overall average of "C" on all work attempted, and (4) meets 
the School and departmental requirements. 

All students who entered the University for the first time in September, 1964, 
or later, must complete the University Core Curriculum requirements in order to 
graduate. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION: REQUIRED AND ELECTIVE SUBJECTS 

Of the 128 hours which are required for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Education, at least 45 hours are required in the School of Physical Educa- 
tion. The remaining hours must be selected from such courses as may be approved 
by the adviser. A candidate for a degree is advised to make a selection of one of 
the teaching combinations and to complete the number of semester hours required in 
each training group. 

Courses are arranged to meet University requirements for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education as well as State requirements for teacher 
certification. The curriculum for the four-year course has been so arranged that con- 
sideration is given to various activities which should constitute a well-rounded pro- 
gram of physical education for children and youth. The courses are arranged in 
twelve groups as follows: 

1. Required activity courses in Physical Education for men: Phys. Ed. 51, 
52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 121, 130, 131, and for women: 31, 32, 33, 54, 61, 63, 
66, 130, 131. 

2. Required theory courses in Physical Education for both men and women, 
unless otherwise indicated are: Phys. Ed. 71, 175, 176, 177, 180, 191, 
278. 

3. Required courses in Dance: 5, 132 for men and women; 35, 36 for 
women. 

4. Required courses in Recreation: Rec. 4. 

5. Required courses in Health Education: Health Ed. 2 and 101 or 102. 

6. Required courses in Safety Education: Safety Ed. 127 and Safety Ed. 181. 

7. Required courses in English. 

8. Required courses in Science which furnish a background for physical edu- 
cation. 

9. Required courses in Social Studies. 

10. Required courses in Music and Art. 

11. Required courses in Mathematics. 

12. Required courses in Speech. 

13. Elective courses. 

Each student must pass a thorough physical examination before he will be 
allowed to enroll in this program. Special emphasis is placed upon personal and pro- 
fessional qualifications of the student as well as upon a high standard of scholarship. 

Student teaching in physical education is taken under the direction of the 
Division of Education. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 325 



Recommendation for Certification 

The prospective teacher who intends to apply for certification for school 
sen ice in the Stale must satisfy requirements for other teaching fields and required 
courses in Education and Physical Education. 

Students planning a teaching career must meet the certification requirements 
that are in effect at their first registration in the teacher preparation program. Stu- 
dents may learn of the requirements for certification from the College of Unman 
Resources and Education and are urged to become familiar with certification regula- 
tions during their freshman year. 

For teacher certification, the student shall be responsible for every registration 
in a course. The grade-point average shall be computed on all work attempted. 

Students interested in teacher preparation may elect the following certified 
curriculums: 

A— Elementary (Grades 1-9) 

B— Teaching Physical Education (Grades 1-12) 
C— Secondary (Grades 7-12) 
Suggested teaching combinations for B and C above: 

Grades 1-12 Secondary Grades 7-12 

1. Art 1. Art 

2. Language Arts 2. English 

3. Mathematics 3. Journalism 

4. General Science 4. Speech 

5. Social Studies 5. Mathematics 

6. Speech 

(Other combinations approved by the adviser) 



CURRICULUM FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

The curriculum for majors is organized to provide professional preparation for 
men and women who are desirous of becoming teachers of health and physical edu- 
cation in elementary schools, high schools, and colleges. The courses are arranged to 
meet the University requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education, as well as the State r< 'quircments for teacher education in secondary and 
elementary schools. Advanced ROTC cannot be counted in the total hours toward 
graduation. 

SECONDARY (Women) 





First 


Year 




Second Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sent. 


Hr. 


First Sem. Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Educ. 105 


Educ. 106 


3 


Biol. 1 


•1 


Biol. 2 


4 


Educ. 100 1 


Soc. Sci. 2 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Soc. Sci. 1 3 


P.E. 54 


o 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


Music 10 


3 


English 35 or L36 3 


P.E. 66 


1 


Dance 5 


1 


P.E. 32 


1 


Math. 21 2 


English 36 or 


136 3 


P.E. 31 


1 


P.E. 33 


1 


P.E. 6] 1 


Rec. 4 


3 


Dance 35 


1 


Dance 36 


2 


P.E. 63 1 


Math. 22 


2 


P.1 . 71 


2 






Speech 31 or .34 3 







326 



17 



17 



17 



17 







rhird 


Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Son. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


Safety Ed. 


127 


2 


Zool. 271 


4 


P.E. 191 


2 


P.E. 278 


3 


Safety Ed. 


181 


2 


P.E. 131 


1 


*Educ. 120 


4 


°Educ. 120 


4 


Health Ed. 


102 


2 


Dance 132 


1 


*Educ. 124 


6 


°Educ. 124 


6 


P.E. 130 




1 


P.E. 176 


2 


*Educ. 152 


2 


*Educ. 152 


2 


RE. 175 




5 


P.E. 177 


3 


Educ. elective 2 


Elective 


3 


Art 30 




3 


P.E. 180 


2 


Elective 


3 






Elective 




3 


Elective 


4 











18 



17 



19 



18 



°Required for those students desiring certification for teaching. May be taken the first 
?cond semester of senior year. 



SECONDARY (Men) 





First 


Year 






Second Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Math. 21 


2 


English 36 or 136 3 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


English 35 


Dr 135 3 


Speech 31 or 34 3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Soc. Sci. 1 


3 


Soc. Sci. 2 3 


P.E. 52 


1 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


Rec. 4 


3 


P.E. 54 2 


P.E. 53 


2 


P.E. 51 


2 


P.E. 55 


2 


P.E. 56 2 


P.E. 71 


2 


Music 10 


3 


Health Ed. 


102 2 


Math. 22 2 


Dance 5 


1 






Elective 


3 


Elective 3 



16 



17 



18 



18 







rhird 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 




Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


P.E. 121 




2 


Dance 132 


1 


P.E. 191 


2 


P.E. 278 


P.E. 130 




1 


Zool. 271 


4 


Educ. 120] 




Educ. 120] 


P.E. 175 




5 


P.E. 131 


1 


Educ. 152 [ * 


12 


Educ 152 } * 


Art 30 




3 


P.E. 176 


2 


Educ. 124 J 




Educ. 124 J 


Educ. 105 




3 


P.E. 177 


3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


Educ. 100 




1 


P.E. 180 


2 








Safety Ed. 


181 


2 


Educ. 106 


3 








Safety Ed. 


127 


2 


Elective 


3 









Hr. 



12 



19 



19 



17 



18 



"Student teaching block— to be taken either first or second semester. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



327 



ELEMENTARY (Women) 





First Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hi. 


Second Sent. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Educ. LOS 


3 


Soc. Sci. 2 


3 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Educ. 100 


1 


English 36 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Soc. Sci. 1 


3 


Hist. 53 


3 


Dance 5 


1 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


English 35 


3 


Math. 57 


3 


Dance 35 


1 


Music 10 


3 


Hist. 52 


3 


Art 2 


2 


P.E. 31 


1 


P.E. 32 


1 


Math. 56 


3 


P.E. 54 


2 


P.E. 71 


2 


P.E. 33 


1 


Art 1 


2 


P.E. 66 


1 


Art 30 


3 






P.E. 61 


1 







18 



17 



19 



17 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


Phys. Sci. 


1 4 


Phys. Sci. 2 


4 


Educ. 106 


3 


Hist. 150 3 


Health Ed. 


101 2 


Dance 132 


2 


Educ. 141 


3 


Library Sci. 203 3 


Music 11 


2 


Music 12 


2 


Educ. 142 


3 


Safety Ed. 127 2 


P.E. 63 


1 


Math. 170 


3 


Educ. 143 


2 


Safety Ed. 181 2 


P.E. 130 


1 


P.E. 131 


1 


Geog. 7-8-9 


3 


P.E. 177 3 


P.E. 175 


5 


P.E. 176 


2 


Math. 171 


3 


P.E. 278 3 


Speech 31 


or 34 3 


P.E. 180 
P.E. 191 


2 
2 









18 



18 



17 



16 



°In addition to the above curriculum the student must complete his student teaching block 
of 10 hours-Education 144, 145, 146. 



ELEMENTARY (Men) 





First 


Year 






Second 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Health Ed. 


101 2 


Soc. Sci. 2 


3 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Soc. Sci. 1 


3 


Art 30 


3 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


Music 10 


3 


P.E. 54 


2 


Dance 5 


1 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


P.E. 55 


2 


P.E. 56 


2 


P.E. 53 


2 


P.E. 51 


2 


Art 1 


2 


Speech 31 or 


34 3 


P.E. 71 


2 


P.E. 52 


1 


Educ. 100 


1 


Art 2 


2 










Math. 56 


3 


Math. 57 


3 










English 35 


3 


English 36 


3 



L5 



15 



19 



18 



328 





Third 


Year 






Fourth 


Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sou. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


P.E. 175 


5 


Dance 132 


1 


Math. 170 


3 


P.E. 176 


o 


Safety Ed. 


127 2 


Geol. 7-8-9 


3 


Hist. 53 


3 


P.E. 177 


3 


Music 11 


2 


Educ. 106 


3 


Lib. Sci. 203 


P.E. 180 


2 


Educ. 105 


3 


Educ. 141 


3 


Phys. Sci. 


1 4 


P.E. 278 


3 


Hist. 52 


3 


Educ. 142 


3 


Safety Ed. 


181 2 


Math. 171 


3 


Hist. 150 


3 


Educ. 143 

Music 12 


2 
o 


Elective 


3 


Phys. Sci. 2 


4 



18 



17 



IS 



17 



°In addition to the above curriculum the student must complete his student teaching block 
of 10 hours— Education 144, 145, 146. 



CURRICULUM FOR PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS 



Degree: Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 

The following curriculum for pre-physical therapy students is organized to 
meet the University requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education as well as satisfying the entrance requirements to physical therapy schools 
approved by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals of the American 
Medical Association. 





First Year 






Seconc 1 


Year 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. 


Hr. 


First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second Sem. Hr. 


English 1 


3 


English 2 


3 


Soc. Sci. 1 


3 


Soc. Sci. 2 3 


Biol. 1 


4 


Biol. 2 


4 


Physics 1 


4 


Physics 2 4 


Hist. 1 


3 


Hist. 2 


3 


English 35 or 


127 3 


English 36 or 128 3 


Dance 5 


1 


Health Ed. 2 


2 


Music 10 


3 


Art 30 3 


P.E. 71 


2 


Rec. 4 


3 


P.E. 61 (W) 


1 


P.E. 54 2 


P.E. 3 (W) 


1 


P.E. 32 (W) 


1 


P.E. 63 (W) 


1 


P.E. 56 (M) 2 


P.E. 31 (W) 


1 


P.E. 33 (W) 


1 


P.E. 55 (M) 


2 


P.E. 66 (W) 1 


P.E. 52 (M) 


1 


P.E. 51 (M) 


2 


Elective* 


2-3 


Elective* 2-3 


P.E. 53 (M) 


2 


Dance 36 I W ) 


2 








Dance 35 (W) 


1 












W 


-16 


W- 


-19 


W- 


17-18 


W-18-19 


M 


-16 


M- 


-17 


M- 


17-18 


M-17-18 



°Electives should be chosen in accordance with admission requirements of the physical 
therapy school in which the student expects to enroll. Suggested electives are: Educ. 105, 106; 
Foreign Language (French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish 1 and 2 or 3 and 4); Math. 2. 3, 
4, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22; Psychol. 101, 110, 116, 122, 125, 151, 218, 222, 229, 236, 243, 252, 253, 
261, 263, 264, 281, 282;' Sociol. 210, 211, 234, 235; Speech 75, 221, 223; Zool. 231, 232, 233, 
235, 236, 237. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



329 





Third 


Year 






Fourth Year 




First Sem. 


Hr. 


Second San 




Hr. 


First San. Hr. 


Second Scm 


llr. 


Psych. 1 


3 


Psych. 2 




3 


Chem. 11 4 


Chem. 12 


4 


Health Ed. 


101 or 


Zool. 271 




4 


P.E. 121 (M) 2 


P.E. 131 


1 


102 


2 


Dance 132 




1 


P.E. 130 1 


Psych, elective 3 


Safety Ed. 


127 2 


P.E. 170 




2 


P.E. 191 2 


P.E. 278 


3 


Safety Ed. 


181 2 


P.E. 177 




3 


Elective' (W) 7-8 


Elective* 


3 


Speech 3 or 1 1 3 


P.E. 180 




2 


Elective (M) 6 






P.E. 175 


5 
















YY-17 




W- 


-15 


W-14-15 




W-14 




M-17 




M- 


-15 


M-15 




M-14 



Entrance requirements to the various schools of physical therapy vary. The 
majority of physical therapy schools approved by the American Medical Association 
accept students if: (1) they have graduated from an approved school of physical 
education; (2) they have graduated from an approved school of nursing; or (3) they 
have completed two or three years of college work. Preference is given those stu- 
dents who have specified credits in physics, chemistry, biology, and psychology. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



DANCE 

35. Modern Dance Technique. I. 1 hr. 

36. Movement and Its Rhythmic Structure. II. 2 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 35. Under- 
standing the nature and scope of rhythm in physical education programs. 

37. Advanced Modern Dance Technique. I, II. 1 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 35. Continu- 
ation of Phys. Ed. 35, including methods of teaching. 

38. Dance Composition. II. 2 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 35, 36. Problems in force, time, 
and space as elements of expressive movement. 

132. Folk Dancing. I, II. 1 hr. Fundamentals and materials of folk dancing. 

171. Basic Rhythms and Dance Accompaniment. II. 2 hr. PR: One semester of 
modern dance. Understanding of the basic principles of rhythm as they re- 
late to body movement. (Ability to play the piano is not required. 

215. Rhythms and Dance. S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate Standing and consent. Principles 
of movement, materials, and practicum in dance. 

210. Modern Dance Techniques and Composition. S. 3 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 35 and 
36, graduate standing, and consent. Application of scientific principles of 
movement; basic principles of music as related to dance movements; chore- 
ographic principles; practicum in dance movement. Principles for teaching the 
dance and problems involved in planning programs. 



206. 



330 



American Folk Dance. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and consent. Study 
oi American Square, contra, circle, and round dances and play party games, 
and their place in community and school programs. Their origin and relation- 
ship to the arts and other spi -cies ol American culture. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

31. Team Sports. I. 1 hr. (W). Fundamentals, skills, and practice in playing soccer, 
basketball, and track and Held. 

32. Team Sports. II. 1 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 32 (W). Techniques and practice in 
teaching and officiating basketball. Fundamentals, skills, and practice in soft- 
ball. 

33. Swimming and Diving. I. 1 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 14 or equiv. (W). 

34. Tennis and Archery. I. 1 hr. (W). 

43. Physical Education for Elementary Teachers. I, II, S. 2 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 1 
and 2, or 41 and 42, or consent. Philosophy, objectives, identification of 
physical education, and a broad selection of activities adapted to the primary 
and intermediate levels. Laboratory work and observations in the elementary 
schools are required. (This course is required for certification for Elementary 
School teaching certificates.) 

50. Beginning and Intermediate Swimming. I, II. 1 hr. (M). Instruction in the 
basic swimming strokes and beginning diving. All physical education and 
recreation majors who do not pass the swimming skill tests must register for 
this course. 

51. Fundamentals of Tumbling and Gymnastics. I. 2 hr. (M). 

52. Advanced Swimming, Lifesaving, and Water Safety. I, II. 1 hr. (M). PR: Phys. 
Ed. 50 or equiv. Theory and practice in aquatics and water safety, including 
American Red Cross Senior Lifesaving Certificate. 

53. Junior and Senior High School Activities and Games. I. 2 hr. (M). Theory and 
fundamentals of speedball, soccer, volleyball, archery, and graded games of 
low organization and lead-up games for grades 1-12. 

54. Individual and Dual Sports. I, II, S. 2 hr. Theory and practice in fundamentals 
of badminton, golf, handball, and tennis. 

55. Fundamentals of Baseball, Basketball, and Wrestling. I. 2 hr. (M). 

56. Fundamentals of Track and Football and Theory of Coaching. II. 2 hr. (M). 

57. Advanced Gymnastics. II. 2 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 51 (M); Phys. Ed. 61 (W). A 
study of advanced skills, techniques, and teaching methods in tumbling, 
regular and special apparatus work and related areas of gymnastics instruction. 

61. Stunts, Tumbling, and Trampoline. I. 1 hr (W). 

63. Hockey and Volleyball. I. 1 hr. (W). Fundamentals, skills, and practice. 

66. Graded Games and Lead-Up Games. II. 1 hr. Games for all ages which may 
be used in home, school, playground, and gymnasium, and lead-up games in 
various sports. 

68. Officiating Athletics. II. 1 hr. (W). Rules, techniques, and laboratory work. 

71. Orientation in Physical Education. I. 2 hr. Purposes, scopes, and possibilities 
in health education, physical education, recreation, and coaching in the school 
program. 

121. Athletic Training. I. 2 hi. (M). Lectures, demonstrations, and practice work in 
training and first aid in athletics. 

124. Instructorship in Swimming, Lifesaving, and Water Safety. II. 1 hr. PR: Phys. 

Ed. 52 or equiv. Teaching methods in swimming and water safety. Meets 
American Red Cross certification standards and course completion carries 
eligibility for teaching swimming, lifesaving, and water safety. Open only to 
students who have valid lifesaving cards. 

130. Program Assisting. I. 1 hr. PR: For men, Phys. Ed. 51, 52, 54. 

131. Program Assisting. II. 1 hr. PR: For men, Phys. Ed. 130. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATIO\ 331 



L75. Anatomj and Kinesiology. I, II. 5 hr. PR: Biol. 1 and 2. Principles of 
mechanics of body movement in relation to anatomical structure. 

17n. The Adapted Program in Physical Education. II. 2 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 175. A 
basic course dealing with deviations from the normal and the organizing and 
adapting of physical education programs to meet the needs of atypical stu- 
dents or those with special problems. 

177. History and Principles of Physical Education. II. 3 hr. Development of physical 
education from earl) civilization to present time. Basic principles underlying 

modern programs. 

180. The Physical Education Program in the Elementary School. I, II. 2 hr. Theory, 
methods, techniques, and practices of activities in physical education for 
elementary school children. 

191. Introduction to Tests in Health and Physical Education. I, II, S. A background 
course in physical achievement tests. History of development; review of out- 
standing tests. Essential procedures used in evaluating tests and their results, 
including statistical analysis. 

206. Program in Individual Sports. S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and consent. 
Designed for coaches of interscholastic athletics. A study of advanced coach- 
ing techniques and methods in track and field activities, wrestling, and gym- 
nastics. 

207. Program in Team Sports. S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and consent. De- 
signed for coaches of intercollegiate athletics. A study of advanced techniques, 
systems of play, offense, defense, methodology, staff organization, and related 
problems in the coaching of football, basketball, and baseball. 

208. Advanced Athletic Training and Conditioning. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 121, 
175; Zool. 171, or equiv. To acquaint graduate students with recent theories, 
practices, and techniques in the prevention, care, and treatment of athletic 
injuries. 

210. Program in Sports. S. 3 hr. (W). PR: Graduate standing and consent. Designed 
especially for women engaged in teaching and coaching. Organization and 
administration of individual, dual, and team sports. Practicum in girls' and 
women's sports. 

211. Organization and Administration of Intramural Sports. S. 3 hr. PR: 4 hr. of 
physical education activity courses, graduate standing, and consent. Critical 
analysis with view to justification from standpoint of objectives and of con- 
tribution to general welfare of students participating. Organization and ad- 
ministration of programs on secondary and college levels. 

212. Extracurricular Physical Education Activities for Secondary School Girls. I, S. 
3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and consent. Critical Analyses of physical educa- 
tion extracurricular activities from the standpoint of objectives and contribu- 
tions to the general welfare of the participants; value of the activities in the 
school and community; relationship to the physical education program; prob- 
lems associated with the organization and administration of the program. 

213. Administration of Athletics. S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and consent; ex- 
perience in coaching and administration. The course is designed for persons 
engaged in actual coaching and administration. A study of the problems as- 
sociated with the organization and administration of interseliolastic and inter- 
collegiate athletic programs and their relationship to physical education. 

275. Principles and Practices of Adapted Physical Education. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Zool. 
171, Phys. Ed. 175, or equiv. Principles and philosophy in building an adapted 
program, types of injuries, classification of students, and application of adapted 
exercises. 

276. Physical Education for the Mentally Retarded. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Consent. Phi- 
losophy, objectives, activities, equipment, program planning, and evaluation 
of physical education programs for the mentally retarded. 

332 



278. Administration of Physical Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 71, 177. 
Modern theories in physical education and guiding principles in organization 
and administration of the program. 

292. Physical Education in the Elementary School. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Teaching ex- 
perience or consent. Philosophy, objectives, activities, equipment, utilization of 
space, program planning, and evaluation for a functional program in elemen- 
tary school physical education. 

294. Philosophy of Physical Education. I, S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and con- 
sent. Study of the place of physical education in education and modern living; 
philosophic processes in physical education; critical analysis of various prob- 
lems confronting the physical educator. 

295. Residence in Corrective Therapy. S. 6 hr. PR: Phys. Ed. 175, 176, and selected 
psychology courses. An intensive 6-week course offered during the Summer 
under the auspices of the professional staff of a hospital. The course consists 
of 240 clock hours of staff lectures and practical clinical experience in correc- 
tive therapy as it is integrated in the physical medicine and rehabilitation pro- 
gram of a hospital. 



SAFETY EDUCATION 

127. Accident Prevention and First Aid. I, II. 2 hr. Standard and advanced first 
aid as outlined by the American Red Cross. 

181. Principles of Safety Education. I, II, S. 2 hr. Introductory course. Basic prin- 
ciples of safety education and accident prevention. Deals with the develop- 
ment of the safety movement and its place in education. 

182. Techniques and Procedures in Driver and Traffic Safety Education. II, S. 

3 hr. PR: Safety Ed. 181 or equiv., or 6 hr. of Education and valid driver's 
license. A basic course designed to prepare teachers of driver education; in- 
cludes supervised practice-driving-instruction (laboratory arranged). 

280. Programs in Safety Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and con- 
sent. Planning programs, methods, and materials for offering instructional pro- 
grams in safe living in school, home, travel, industry, physical education, ath- 
letics, and recreation. 

281. Driver and Traffic Safety Education Programs. II, S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate 
standing and consent. Philosophy, objectives, new and advanced equipment, 
methods and materials in driver and traffic safety education; program plan- 
ning and evaluative techniques in schools and adult programs. Includes lab- 
oratory with various methods, materials, and instructional techniques. 

282. Problems in Driver and Traffic Safety Education. I, II, S. PR: Graduate stand- 
ing and consent. Advanced course. Individual problems encountered in teach- 
ing driver and traffic safety education. Examination of existing courses of 
study, research, and supervisory and evaluative practices. 

283. Philosophy of Safety Education. I, II, S. 3 hr. PR: Graduate standing and con- 
sent. Study of the place of safety education in modern living; philosophies 
of safety education as expounded by leaders in the field; emphasis on acci- 
dent causation and accident prevention in various areas of safety; and research 
implications. 



PHYSICAL EDI CATIOh 333 



Index 



Absences, student 34, 36 
Absentia work 29 
Academic regulations 25 
Academic standards committee 36 
Accounting 187, 189 
Accreditation of WVU 8 

ACT (tests) 11 

ADMISSIONS 11-18 

From secondary schools 11; transfer 
students 12; special students 13; 
foreign students 13; veterans 14 

Advanced standing examination 13 
Advertising 307 
Advisers, student 36 
Aerospace engineering 225, 235 
Aerospace studies (air science) 315 
Agricultural: biochemistry 43, 54; 

economics 43, 55; education 44, 56; 

engineering 44, 225, 237; experiment 

station 40; mechanics 57 
Agriculture 40, 54 

AGRICULTURE AND FORESTRY 40 

Admission 11; Agriculture 43; 
Forestry 64 

Agronomy and genetics 45, 57 
Air science (aerospace studies) 315 

(See also Military Science under "M") 
Animal industries 46, 58 

APPALACHIAN CENTER 77 

ART 208 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 

Bachelor's degree 100; Combined 
courses 103; Courses and curricula 
107-180; Pre-professional courses 104- 
106; Requirements for degrees 100 

Ufionomy 155 
Auditing (courses 



24 



Baccalaureate degrees 26; 

schools and colleges 
Bachelor of arts LOO 
Bach< lor of science 1 00 
Bacteriology, agricultural 48, 63 
Bands 197' 

Biochemistry, agricultural 43, 54 
Biology 107 
Board and lodging 2 I 
Botany 109 
Broadcasting 308 
Bureau of business research L83 
Bun au, coal research 223 
Bureau For go> i i omenl research 98 

334 



See individual 



Business administration 187 
Business law 190 



Cheating, procedure for handling 36 
Chemical engineering 226, 237 
Chemistry 111 
Child development and family relations 

295 
Civil engineering 227, 238 
Classification of students 31-33 
Class load 29 

CLINICAL STUDIES 259 

Speech pathology & audiology 259; 
Courses 260 

Coal research bureau 223 

COMMERCE 181 

Admission 14; Courses 189; Curricula 
186-189; Pre-commerce 104, 186 

Committees, WVU 7 

Conduct, student 36 

Core curriculum requirements 26 

Correspondence, University 2; credit 

work 29 
Costs (of college) 24 
County extension workers 80 
Course, numbering 39; schedules 39 

CREATIVE ARTS CENTER 194 

Music: faculty 194; fees, 22; courses 

205; curricula 199-204 
Art: faculty 195; courses 210; curricula 

209 
Drama: faculty 195; courses 214; 

curricula 213 

Credits: college 29; entrance 11; required 

for degrees 32-33 
Curricula and courses 39 



Daily Athcnacinn 22, 301 

Dance 330 

Degrees 25 {see also College or School 

.sections) 
Dental hygiene L5 

DENTISTRY 

Admission I 1: pre-dentistry 102 
( details in current Medical Center 
Announcements) 

DRAMA 212 

Faculty L96; courses 214; curricula 

213-214 



Economics 43 55, 115, 189-190 



EDUCATION 261 

Admission 16; faculty 225: courses 
285; general requirements 263; pre- 
education 105 

Electrical engineering 228, 241 

ENGINEERING 

Admission 15; faculty 220; courses 
235; curricula 225 

English 118 

English proficiency requirement 27 

Entomology 61 

Entrance, fees 19; unit 11 

Evening education 25 

Examinations 30 

Expenses (of college) 24 

Extension studies 22 



Failures .34 

FAMILY RESOURCES 

Faculty 256; courses 294; requirements 
for degrees 292 

Farms, experimental 41 

Fees 19; special 21; laboratory 19 

Finance 192 

Fish management 69 

Food and nutrition 296 

Foreign languages 132 

Foreign students 13 

Forest management 67 

FORESTRY 64 

Admission 11; courses 72; requirements 
for degrees 67-71 

French 132 



Cenetics 58 

Geography 142 

Geology 142 

German 134 

Grading system 34 

Graduation with honors 28 

Creek 140 

H 

I [ealth service fee 22 

Hebrew 140 

History 146: of WVU 7 

Home economics 291 

Honors, graduation with 28; program 98 

Horticulture 47, 61 

Housing and design 295 

HUMAN RESOURCES AND 
EDUCATION 
Admission 16; faculty 254; clinical 

studies 258; education 261: family 
resources 291; social work 298 
Humanities 148 



I 
Identification card, student 36 
Incompletes and failures 34 
Industrial arts 280 
Industrial engineering 229, 243 
Industrial managemi nt 188 
Instructors 36 
Intramural sports 323 
Italian 137 

J, K 

JOURNALISM 300 

Admission 16; faculty 303; courses 
311; curricula 306-310; pre-journalism 
311 

Kanawha valley graduate center 9 

L 

Laboratory fees: See Fees 
Labor studies, institute for 78 
Landscape architecture 52, 62 
Languages 132 
Late registration 24 
Latin 135 

LAW 

( See current college of Law 

Announcements) 

Library science 149 
Linguistics 141 
Literature 118 

M 

Management 188, 192 
Marketing 188, 193 
Materials science engineering 238 
Mathematics and astronomy 157 
Maximum and minimum work 29 
Mechanical engineering 230, 247 
Mechanics 249 

MEDICAL CENTER 

Dentistry 116; pre-dentistiy 102, 104; 
Medicine 16; pre-medicine 102, 104; 

medical technology 106 
Nursing 18 
Pharmacy 18; pre-pharmacy 106 

( See current Medical Center 

Announcements) 

Medical technology 17, 106 

MEDICINE 

Admission 16; medical technology 1 i . 
106; pre-medicine 102. 104 
(See current Medical Center 
Announcements) 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND AIR 

FORCE AEROSPACE STUDIES 315- 
319 

MINES 

Admission 15, 218; faculty 223; courses 
250; curricula 232 



INDEX 



335 



Mountainlair fee 20 

MUSIC 196 

Admission 14; faculty 195; courses 
205; curricula 198-204; fees 22 

N, O 

Nonresident students 

(see footnote 8, page 21) 
Nuclear engineering 238 

NURSING 

Admission 18 (See current Medical 
Center Announcements) 

Oil and gas engineering 234, 252 



Parkersburg center 9 
Part-time fees 20 
Pass-fail grading 34 
Petroleum engineering 234, 252 

PHARMACY 

Admission 18; pre-pharmacy 106 (See 
current Medical Center 
Announcements) 

Philosophy 157 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 320 

Faculty 321; courses 330; curricula 
326; general program 27, 323; 
requirements for degrees 325 

Physics 160 

Plant pathology 48, 63 

Political science 162 

Pre-veterinary medicine 53 

Probation and suspension 35-36 

Psychology 168 

Public relations (Joum.) 309 

Public speaking 176 



Radio and TV courses 177 
Readmission 13 



Recreation courses 75 

Re-entry after withdrawal 13, 30 

Refunding of fees 21 

Registration 24 

Religious studies 171 

Reports, grade 31 

Residence requirements 28; work done 

out of residence 29 
Russian 134 



Safety education 333 

Scholastic standing 34 

Secretarial studies 290 

Semester course schedules 39 

Semester fees 19-22 

Social science 173 

Social work 298 

Sociology 173 

Spanish 133 

Special fees 21-22 

Special students 13 

Speech 176 

Speech pathology and audiology 258 

Statistics 156 

Substitution for required courses 30 

Summer session 22 

Suspension regulations 35-36 

Swahili 140 

T, V 

Television courses 177 

Textiles and clothing 294 

Theoretical and applied mechanics 249 

Transfer students 12 

Veterans 14 

Veterinary medicine 60 

Visitors to classes 25 

w, z 

Wildlife and fish management 69 

Wood industries 68 

Wood science 39 

Withdrawal from class or WVU 30; 

re-entry after withdrawal 30 
Zoology 110 



336